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Let's talk , Cincinnati Toolmaster 1A and 1B

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cincinnati JA

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Hi everyone , I recently purchased a Cincinnati Toolmaster 1A/1B and I have been doing a lot of research and buying parts and what not but the most frustrating part of it all is the Cincinnati part numbers ... Does anyone know of a cross reference for the cinci part numbers?

Well all of that aside I have figured most of it out anyways but I ordered two gear belts , 270H100, but I have a problem. When I received them and measured they are 1" wide and the gear belt on my mill was about .700" and the gears are about .830" wide/thick . But it still reads 270H100 so I'm left scratching my head . What is the belt numbers you guys are using? I'm guessing that someone cut this belt number down maybe .
 

GK1918

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#2
Hi Josh, Mine came with new belts, Ill get the numbers today and get back, I do know the bottom
(cog belt) says Gates commercial. Although the top is a V belt they still have to be matched. Sam
 

cincinnati JA

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Hi Josh, Mine came with new belts, Ill get the numbers today and get back, I do know the bottom
(cog belt) says Gates commercial. Although the top is a V belt they still have to be matched. Sam
Thank you Sam! It's always so disappointing to order something and when you get it its wrong :( . At least I can return them and only lose shipping both ways which is kind of a bummer but oh well!

I talked to Duke over at Cincinnati and I gave him some part numbers because thy might still have some old new stock in storage somewhere but every time he says he's going to quote me always tells me that the parts are going to be 1000s of dollars. This I don't understand really but I so appreciate his honesty at least. If you have a machine that's obsolete and you really provide no support for them then why not sell off all your old new stock and for a reasonable price as well? I own four old Farmall Cubs and they sold off all their old new stock on a lot of parts but you can get the stuff for a good price . Oh well I have to keep my eyes and ears open for cinci parts.

Know of anyone with a good vise for sale ? I haven't bought a vise for the mill yet. I really liked the looks of that universal vise from Cincinnati .



Josh
 

cincinnati JA

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I also need some info on motor shafts. As you will see in the photos below there is a red motor on top of the machine. It looks like someone decommissioned this mill and was using it as a drill press only so they made a contraption out of the old jack shaft to work with a 240v single phase motor . Well I didn't like how they had this set up so when I bought this machine the dealer threw in a Bridgeport GE pancake motor (1hp) . I made it for fine without the adapter ring but I really want the ring . I don't like how the motor will be bolted only to the aluminium housing . The problem is if I raise it up the 1/2" the motor shaft is too short for the pulley to be properly placed far enough on the shaft. I will post more detailed pics later. So has anyone changed shafts on a motor before ?

Before
D97A96C2-1C6B-4709-A442-E7160B17C694-6109-0000021C7B50A8AD.jpg

After
C6E1B458-3372-46B8-9FB7-E71D3800E9C2-12595-00000597E1FE828B.jpg

Theoretically this motor should have zero vibrations and "wabble" so I guess I should have no issues with it being mounted directly to the aluminium housing but I'm still weary .

If anyone has a source for an original Toolmaster pancake motor for this machine let me know because that's what I really want or one that fits the same at lease. The original motor for this machine was 1200rpm the one I have now is 1725rpm but I've already calculated the spindle speed change and cinci also had an option for a 1800rpm motor which I'm not opposed to either but my spindle speeds are for 1200.
 

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GK1918

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#5
Did you check out Graingers, I'm positive they carry pancakes I think GE. And where is the 1/2 comming
from is that an adaptor ring? So thats causing the shaft to be too short? No matter what you decide
to do the belts stay the same. I looked yesterday and the bottom belt is "Gates Power Timing Belt
#270-HO75" the top belt is just a plain jane V belt and I have no number anywhere even used a
spy glass, and both my belts are new, they can measure that at Napa. And then Is there a real need
for a pancake most any thing will work such as many years ago my big lathe came with a 15hp 406vt (I
think) three phase big thing- and I put a 110v from a table saw (just for now) and the "just for now"
motor is still on there for 30yrs no problem. Im thinking more like a 1/4" alum ring. sam
 

cincinnati JA

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Did you check out Graingers, I'm positive they carry pancakes I think GE. And where is the 1/2 comming
from is that an adaptor ring? So thats causing the shaft to be too short? No matter what you decide
to do the belts stay the same. I looked yesterday and the bottom belt is "Gates Power Timing Belt
#270-HO75" the top belt is just a plain jane V belt and I have no number anywhere even used a
spy glass, and both my belts are new, they can measure that at Napa. And then Is there a real need
for a pancake most any thing will work such as many years ago my big lathe came with a 15hp 406vt (I
think) three phase big thing- and I put a 110v from a table saw (just for now) and the "just for now"
motor is still on there for 30yrs no problem. Im thinking more like a 1/4" alum ring. sam
Hey Sam , thanks for the number. I ordered two and am returning the others. Grainger does sell pancakes so I may look into that. I have a 1725 1hp 3phase pancake to go on top and I do believe it will work. Maybe I can just tig weld an extension to the exhausting shaft and that will give me the added security.

Josh
 

pineyfolks

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#7
When building VW motors we used something called case savers to give more thread in the block because of how thin they were. There nothing special, similar to a helicoil. They give you more threads in a thin plate. Might work for you :thinking:
 

GK1918

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#8
Josh, we had a Delco tractor starter motor come in with a broken shaft just before the Bendix. We chucked
up the amature faced off the end -center drilled that. Faced off the drive end center drilled that. Then
again drilled both (ends for a press fit dowl pin) and pressed it. Now being back together, the whole
amature rechucked with tailstock dead center. Next we used parting tool right at the pinned joint right to the pin.
Migged that up turned off the weld-done. All done on a SB 9A. Thats how to lenghten your motor shaft.
There is way more stress on a starter than a motor with belts and this is still working today. I suggest
doing this, the (shaft) addition should have a larger diameter than the motor shaft so after the addition
can be turned exactly the same as motor shaft, the lathe will cut a keyway just fine. Guess ya gotta get
that 9A making chips. Ill look in my Grainger 5,000 page book but I think you sit down & seat belts on
Graingers aint cheap. I you were here I'll do it for zip or send it to me You got my email add. Samuel
 
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cincinnati JA

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#9
When building VW motors we used something called case savers to give more thread in the block because of how thin they were. There nothing special, similar to a helicoil. They give you more threads in a thin plate. Might work for you :thinking:
I thought about heli coils because I have a few kits around. I am trying to make the machine as original as possible but this Bridgeport motor will have to do !
 

cincinnati JA

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Josh, we had a Delco tractor starter motor come in with a broken shaft just before the Bendix. We chucked
up the amature faced off the end -center drilled that. Faced off the drive end center drilled that. Then
again drilled both (ends for a press fit dowl pin) and pressed it. Now being back together, the whole
amature rechucked with tailstock dead center. Next we used parting tool right at the pinned joint right to the pin.
Migged that up turned off the weld-done. All done on a SB 9A. Thats how to lenghten your motor shaft.
There is way more stress on a starter than a motor with belts and this is still working today. I suggest
doing this, the (shaft) addition should have a larger diameter than the motor shaft so after the addition
can be turned exactly the same as motor shaft, the lathe will cut a keyway just fine. Guess ya gotta get
that 9A making chips. Ill look in my Grainger 5,000 page book but I think you sit down & seat belts on
Graingers aint cheap. I you were here I'll do it for zip or send it to me You got my email add. Samuel
Sam , sounds like a plan!

So what is the proper name for the wrench/tool to pull apart those gears?

I need to get the front set out so I can pull out the rear pulleys.

Also I need to know what some other things are:


The fuse circled in red ... What type do you guys have? I pulled out a N3 Buss fuse which is a 230v 3 amp which seems quite low don't you think?

Also circled in green... What are these exactly?

87C87B33-2E2E-4645-B7CE-17266F6A1163-2912-000001C21C56AB54.jpg

601A9958-6CA4-4F39-88F8-FDCA0A2EB9B1-2912-000001C215219890.jpg

Also is the 115v step down only for the light ? I'm not exactly sure what the "starter" is .
 

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Tony Wells

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Back up a little to extending the shaft. Did many, many broken and replacement shafts at my second shop of employment. Common way was to bore a hole in the end of the shaft, 45° chamfer heavily, and turn an oversized shaft piece down to a nub to fit the bore and 45° it as well. That way there is no real precision required to the bore. Just match the nub to it. About an inch of engagement is enough. Tight within 0.001 is fine. Tap it in, weld it out and steady rest the bearing journal on the original shaft and turn to match. Center drill if needed. Key if needed. Usually took less than an hour. Did motors up to about 150 hp or so. Never had a come-back.
 

GK1918

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#12
first what wrench or tool? what gears? After high school I worked in Raytheon on the Applo project so
what I see doesnt scare me. But it does no good with out the "key diagram" we use to call it. Each
and every marked terminal goes somewhere & with out a key diagram, each and every one has to be
physically traced. Personally I see no need of all that. I ll bet there is extra terminals for add on
attachments. And that you are replacing the main motor "wouldnt it make more sense= line into master
disconect > from there to on & off buttons >from there to for/rev switch>from there to main motor.


On mine totally origional, brand new in there, my guess is with main on, power goes to on/off buttons,
from there power comes back to the (rear) juicing up relays & a step down transformer, then back
to table motor switch, coolant switch and for/rev switch main motor. Thats what I hear pushing the
on button. CLUNK! I' ve only had my panel off once Its heavier than me and I rememer that fuse and ill bet
its for what seems to be a stepdown trans. to 110vts probably for a light bulb (my lights plugged
directly in wall plug 110) I leave that master (rear on) all the time, I just shut the 220 down when
leaving the shop, cause they are always leaving air lines on, then the compressor runs all night.
electrical engineers? fun aint it.
 

Cal Haines

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#13
...

Also circled in green... What are these exactly?

87C87B33-2E2E-4645-B7CE-17266F6A1163-2912-000001C21C56AB54.jpg



Also is the 115v step down only for the light ? I'm not exactly sure what the "starter" is .
The devices circled in green are overload devices, they're like circuit breakers. Apparently the one on the bottom is for the saddle motor. There's another pair built into the bottom of the motor starter for 1M.

The step down transformer also powers the control circuit for motor 1M (probably the spindle motor. It's what makes the start and stop buttons work with the motor starter immediately above the transformer.

Cal
 

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cincinnati JA

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#14
Back up a little to extending the shaft. Did many, many broken and replacement shafts at my second shop of employment. Common way was to bore a hole in the end of the shaft, 45° chamfer heavily, and turn an oversized shaft piece down to a nub to fit the bore and 45° it as well. That way there is no real precision required to the bore. Just match the nub to it. About an inch of engagement is enough. Tight within 0.001 is fine. Tap it in, weld it out and steady rest the bearing journal on the original shaft and turn to match. Center drill if needed. Key if needed. Usually took less than an hour. Did motors up to about 150 hp or so. Never had a come-back.
To do this do you pull the shaft out of the motor? I would think so in order to turn the shaft on the lathe correct ?

- - - Updated - - -

The devices circled in green are overload devices, they're like circuit breakers. Apparently the one on the bottom is for the saddle motor. There's another pair built into the bottom of the motor starter for 1M.

The step down transformer also powers the control circuit for motor 1M (probably the spindle motor. It's what makes the start and stop buttons work with the motor starter immediately above the transformer.

Cal
I your opinion should I continue to use these or wire everything to breakers and then the main coming out of the box will take care of the main breaker. Looking at this thing maybe I can basically set this up like a breaker panel on the wall with a main and individual breakers or should these overload devices work fine? Can you explain to me the motor starter and how it actually works I've always been confused about these motor "starters" I understand capacitors for starting but this is not that. Is this for the purpose of sending a higher "jolt" at first to kick start the motor?

Also what fuse would you guys suggest I use in the red circle ? As I said it is a 3amp 230v that was in there originally or at least the last one put in the machine . It just seems awfully low on the the amperage .
 

cincinnati JA

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first what wrench or tool? what gears? After high school I worked in Raytheon on the Applo project so
what I see doesnt scare me. But it does no good with out the "key diagram" we use to call it. Each
and every marked terminal goes somewhere & with out a key diagram, each and every one has to be
physically traced. Personally I see no need of all that. I ll bet there is extra terminals for add on
attachments. And that you are replacing the main motor "wouldnt it make more sense= line into master
disconect > from there to on & off buttons >from there to for/rev switch>from there to main motor.


On mine totally origional, brand new in there, my guess is with main on, power goes to on/off buttons,
from there power comes back to the (rear) juicing up relays & a step down transformer, then back
to table motor switch, coolant switch and for/rev switch main motor. Thats what I hear pushing the
on button. CLUNK! I' ve only had my panel off once Its heavier than me and I rememer that fuse and ill bet
its for what seems to be a stepdown trans. to 110vts probably for a light bulb (my lights plugged
directly in wall plug 110) I leave that master (rear on) all the time, I just shut the 220 down when
leaving the shop, cause they are always leaving air lines on, then the compressor runs all night.
electrical engineers? fun aint it.
On the top gear above the spindle which is the small gear there is two holes which seems to be for some sort of wrench . You can see it in the photo. Also if you download the schematic from my website you can see the full view of it and it makes sense to follow the wires. http://www.stellarsmithing.com/cincinnatiTM

I want to pull the gears directly above the spindle but have no idea what to call the tool that would do that.

I want to keep the unit as self contained as possible being one sole unit . Only one power cord into the machine and a few coming out of the center to power the shaper, spindle, and cross feed motor. I also am going to hard wire a light into it and a few receptacles . I have a few ideas .

I'm starting to get irritated now because I'm still waiting on my phase converter and now I'm waiting for their call but they won't call me back ... I'm going to call tomorrow about it again .

I also still need a coolant pump but I don't really know where to start with that. I don't even know what the style pump they use looks like or exactly what type I need .
 
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Tony Wells

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#16
To do this do you pull the shaft out of the motor? I would think so in order to turn the shaft on the lathe correct ?

- - - Updated - - -
Very rarely have I found a motor that I couldn't run the steady rest on the bearing journal with the rotor complete. IOW, no, no need to remove the shaft. That has its own complications that should be avoided whenever possible.

That reminds me of one motor I broke a file into 3 pieces with my forefinger.....when I trapped it in the cast aluminum cooling fins of the rotor. I still have no nerves in that fingertip. And that's been 34 years. I still have 2 pieces of the file. But kept 100% of the finger. :)
 

Cal Haines

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#17
...

I your opinion should I continue to use these or wire everything to breakers and then the main coming out of the box will take care of the main breaker. Looking at this thing maybe I can basically set this up like a breaker panel on the wall with a main and individual breakers or should these overload devices work fine? Can you explain to me the motor starter and how it actually works I've always been confused about these motor "starters" I understand capacitors for starting but this is not that. Is this for the purpose of sending a higher "jolt" at first to kick start the motor?

Also what fuse would you guys suggest I use in the red circle ? As I said it is a 3amp 230v that was in there originally or at least the last one put in the machine . It just seems awfully low on the the amperage .
There's absolutely no reason to change the controls unless they are damaged beyond repair. It's an old machine, but that doesn't mean that old parts don't work and work well. You wouldn't graft the spindle from an Chinese mill drill on the machine just because spindle is newer, would you? The electrical engineers who put the motors and controls on these machines were every bit as good as the mechanical engineers that designed the rest. In fact, most of those old EEs knew a heck of a lot more about motors and such than most control engineers in the field today. The fact that so many of these old machines are still running just fine on their vintage motors and controls is a testimony to how well the old EEs did their jobs.

The difference between the overload devices and the type of circuit breaker that you find in your electrical panel is the the overloads don't operate to directly interrupt the circuit. Each one has a switch that is normally closed and opens when the heater reaches a certain temperature. The switches for all of the overload devices are wired in series so that if any one of them reaches the overload state the main AC contactor will open and shut down power to the machine. Emergency stop buttons are also connected to the circuit. For example, it the feed motor overloads, you don't want the spindle to keep turning and vise versa. Imagine if the spindle stopped turning and the feed motor kept running? Somethings going to get broken.

On large single phase motors the motor starter is a relay or mechanical device that connects a start winding and usually a starting capacitor to power long enough to get the motor turning and then automatically disconnects the starting circuit. On most machine tools a different type of "motor starter" is used. They are basically big relays (electrically operated switches) and are often called contactors. Pressing the start button momentarily applies power to the contactor's coil circuit, causing the contacts to close if nothing is wrong. Now, all of the overload's switches, the emergency stop button(s) and any interlock switches have to be closed in order for the coil to get power and cause the contacts to close. An example of an interlock switch is a spindle lock interlock that prevents you from starting the machine if the spindle is locked. When the contactor closes one of its contacts is usually used to continue to power the coil circuit after the start button is released. This same system is used on all sorts of industrial machinery, some so large that you can't see the other side. If someone has pushed an emergency stop you have to go and pull it out before the machine can be started.

The 3A fuse only powers the work light and the contactor coil circuit, not the whole machine. The machine's motors are protected by the overload devices. Often there are also fuses and a knife-type disconnect switch in a box on the back or side of the machine where power comes in, but those fuses don't provide the primary protection for the machine's motors.

If any of that doesn't make sense, holler and I'll try again.

Cal
 

cincinnati JA

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There's absolutely no reason to change the controls unless they are damaged beyond repair. It's an old machine, but that doesn't mean that old parts don't work and work well. You wouldn't graft the spindle from an Chinese mill drill on the machine just because spindle is newer, would you? The electrical engineers who put the motors and controls on these machines were every bit as good as the mechanical engineers that designed the rest. In fact, most of those old EEs knew a heck of a lot more about motors and such than most control engineers in the field today. The fact that so many of these old machines are still running just fine on their vintage motors and controls is a testimony to how well the old EEs did their jobs.

The difference between the overload devices and the type of circuit breaker that you find in your electrical panel is the the overloads don't operate to directly interrupt the circuit. Each one has a switch that is normally closed and opens when the heater reaches a certain temperature. The switches for all of the overload devices are wired in series so that if any one of them reaches the overload state the main AC contactor will open and shut down power to the machine. Emergency stop buttons are also connected to the circuit. For example, it the feed motor overloads, you don't want the spindle to keep turning and vise versa. Imagine if the spindle stopped turning and the feed motor kept running? Somethings going to get broken.

On large single phase motors the motor starter is a relay or mechanical device that connects a start winding and usually a starting capacitor to power long enough to get the motor turning and then automatically disconnects the starting circuit. On most machine tools a different type of "motor starter" is used. They are basically big relays (electrically operated switches) and are often called contactors. Pressing the start button momentarily applies power to the contactor's coil circuit, causing the contacts to close if nothing is wrong. Now, all of the overload's switches, the emergency stop button(s) and any interlock switches have to be closed in order for the coil to get power and cause the contacts to close. An example of an interlock switch is a spindle lock interlock that prevents you from starting the machine if the spindle is locked. When the contactor closes one of its contacts is usually used to continue to power the coil circuit after the start button is released. This same system is used on all sorts of industrial machinery, some so large that you can't see the other side. If someone has pushed an emergency stop you have to go and pull it out before the machine can be started.

The 3A fuse only powers the work light and the contactor coil circuit, not the whole machine. The machine's motors are protected by the overload devices. Often there are also fuses and a knife-type disconnect switch in a box on the back or side of the machine where power comes in, but those fuses don't provide the primary protection for the machine's motors.

If any of that doesn't make sense, holler and I'll try again.

Cal
Cal, Wow! This is explained very well to me and makes perfect sense.

I intend to use all of the electrical parts in this machine as they are . One question though... I have a knife type disconnect on the side that takes fuses as you predicted . No fuses where in there so I have nothing to go by but by the size of wire and amps the motors will pull it is safe to assume I can choose anything slightly above the amperage being pulled? Should I continue to use these style disconnects or change this over to breakers ? I'm fine with buying fuses to be honest .

If you had to guess what fuses would you choose? I will take a photo tomorrow evening of exactly what I have
 

GK1918

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#19
Now I have a question Josh, back to the coolant. Its on the table back side there is only a little plate
call it a funnel and appears coolant just runs and drips all over knee ways. That drives me, so I made
another plate and brazed an elbow with that kinky 1/2" hose stuff now it drains into the drain no more
mess. So is yours like that just curious sam
 

Cal Haines

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#20
...

I intend to use all of the electrical parts in this machine as they are . One question though... I have a knife type disconnect on the side that takes fuses as you predicted . No fuses where in there so I have nothing to go by but by the size of wire and amps the motors will pull it is safe to assume I can choose anything slightly above the amperage being pulled? Should I continue to use these style disconnects or change this over to breakers ? I'm fine with buying fuses to be honest .

If you had to guess what fuses would you choose? I will take a photo tomorrow evening of exactly what I have
There's no need to change the disconnect box. Breakers aren't necessary. The only reason that a fuse would blow is if something shorts out and that's not likely to happen unless someone makes a mistake while working on the machine's wiring. Unlike a household circuit, where you can plug too many things into a circuit and trip a breaker, the electrical load on the machine is fixed. There's no reason that a fuse will blow in normal operation.

The fuses are there to protect the wiring. The overloads protect the motors. The size of the fuse depends on the gauge of wire that was used to wire the machine. I would guess that #12 was used, in which case 20A, time delay fuses would be correct. If it's #14, use 15A fuses.

Cal
 

cincinnati JA

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#21
There's no need to change the disconnect box. Breakers aren't necessary. The only reason that a fuse would blow is if something shorts out and that's not likely to happen unless someone makes a mistake while working on the machine's wiring. Unlike a household circuit, where you can plug too many things into a circuit and trip a breaker, the electrical load on the machine is fixed. There's no reason that a fuse will blow in normal operation.

The fuses are there to protect the wiring. The overloads protect the motors. The size of the fuse depends on the gauge of wire that was used to wire the machine. I would guess that #12 was used, in which case 20A, time delay fuses would be correct. If it's #14, use 15A fuses.

Cal
Sounds good! Thank you for the info. I was going to go work on the machine tonight but I went to sleep instead . Been a very long work week. I guess I need to make an order for some fuses!

- - - Updated - - -

Now I have a question Josh, back to the coolant. Its on the table back side there is only a little plate
call it a funnel and appears coolant just runs and drips all over knee ways. That drives me, so I made
another plate and brazed an elbow with that kinky 1/2" hose stuff now it drains into the drain no more
mess. So is yours like that just curious sam
Sam I will take some close ups for you tomorrow . I am going to be trying to make my coolant system into a hybrid system. The coolant will flow as intended when the machine was new but I'm in a air line to the system to make it a mister . I still need to source a pump though!
 

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#22
I just picked up my rotary 5hp phase converter so I may need some wiring help guys at some point in time !

I also picked up a nice Bridgeport machinist vice ! Boy so they hold their value ! $90 for the vice and $450 for the converter .



View attachment 154069 View attachment 154071
end
 
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cincinnati JA

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Sam , I realize what you're talking about now with the back plate behind the coolant drain. I took that off while cleaning the machine and I don't know where I put it but I was thinking on breaking another piece of sheet metal that was larger and putting it there
 

cincinnati JA

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Sam, I found the little plate... Yea I see what you are saying its pretty worthless although when I hook the air it should cut down on much spillage although I still have to pick out a pump .

I decided to repaint the machine and when I was at Sherwin Williams I matched the color but I still thought it was too dark so I picked the lighter shade. I should have trusted my first pick but anyways at $21 a quart this is going to stay the color.

Looks good enough :)

551AB95F-0F50-4640-B1E9-5681AC6F0CFC-6087-00000336813D588F.jpg

1F5E95FA-0DD2-451E-A543-B905D43CA186-6087-000003369E5A207E.jpg

41DF5734-8DA0-4538-8F6A-B37BA81C37CE-6087-0000033693434134.jpg

Here is the inside of the rotary phase converter
5E7B8398-591E-40AC-BE27-34560D4EBB19-6087-00000339202FD526.jpg

I am learning more every day!
 

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GK1918

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#25
Thats beauty, Its not going to be long now. I dont know if this color will show, but heres one of mine
it is Sage Green - Rustoleum any hardware store. I know the lighting is a little off but its real close to your
color. Anyways my little drain hose works perfectly. Curious, did you take the pump housing off, and is the
copper tubing still in there (pump output) ? I got my eyes looking around for a pump that will work, problem
is most pumps want to pump with some pressure and this kind of pump just wants to move liquid, just giving
a lazy stream. And I am doing fine with plain ole green anti freeze, I just figure its good for engine blocks and
lubes water pumps it does the job for cheap. sam

112-1263_IMG_2.JPG
 
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Cal Haines

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#26
...
Here is the inside of the rotary phase converter
5E7B8398-591E-40AC-BE27-34560D4EBB19-6087-00000339202FD526.jpg

...
I see a green and white wire connecting to what appears to be the incoming hot terminals. By code, neither white nor green can be used as "hot" leads; they are both assumed to be at ground potential. You should be using black or red or blue for "hot" leads. If you use white or green, tape 4 or so inches of each end black so that anyone looking at them can tell they are hot.

Cal
 

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cincinnati JA

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#27
I see a green and white wire connecting to what appears to be the incoming hot terminals. By code, neither white nor green can be used as "hot" leads; they are both assumed to be at ground potential. You should be using black or red or blue for "hot" leads. If you use white or green, tape 4 or so inches of each end black so that anyone looking at them can tell they are hot.

Cal
I appreciate the concern but these were just dangling on there because the company did a start up test for me to show me what it's suppose to sound like . When I properly wire the converter it will have the proper US standard color codes and match all electrical safety codes I still have a lot to buy and I have a master electrician coming out tomorrow to give me the run down.

- - - Updated - - -

Thats beauty, Its not going to be long now. I dont know if this color will show, but heres one of mine
it is Sage Green - Rustoleum any hardware store. I know the lighting is a little off but its real close to your
color. Anyways my little drain hose works perfectly. Curious, did you take the pump housing off, and is the
copper tubing still in there (pump output) ? I got my eyes looking around for a pump that will work, problem
is most pumps want to pump with some pressure and this kind of pump just wants to move liquid, just giving
a lazy stream. And I am doing fine with plain ole green anti freeze, I just figure its good for engine blocks and
lubes water pumps it does the job for cheap. sam
I love that color Sam! Btw I haven't taken off the pump mount yet I still need to suck out the nasty coolant in it. Thank you for looking for me I am having no luck on line. I have been emailing a guy who im has some pump numbers he is getting me . I am planning on making a er40 collar and I should be able to use them as well .

- - - Updated - - -

I took a little video on my collet set up and the wrench I made .

http://youtu.be/3xUQ59MbLfk
 

cincinnati JA

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#28
Ok so I got my rotary phase converter all wired up and my 3 phase panel . I have my 1940's tap grinder working and now all I need to do is get the mill running . I still need a gusher pump for the rear of the machine and I believe I need a new contactor . It seems to be falling apart . Does anyone have a good photo of their contactor? Anyways here are some photos. I ran new wire from the inside to the mill head .

D4606F58-C447-4CDF-BB24-747A7F59BB79-609-0000006AE27E6B0C.jpg
http://i1199.photobucket.com/albums...DF-BB24-747A7F59BB79-609-0000006AE27E6B0C.jpg

DEA39927-2D82-4878-86AF-7957974DB349-609-0000006AC7B383BE.jpg
http://i1199.photobucket.com/albums...78-86AF-7957974DB349-609-0000006AC7B383BE.jpg

Here is a little quic video
http://i1199.photobucket.com/albums...35-9EEF-6FEB3684E4E8-609-0000006AF149AEC1.mp4

3956FF4E-2DC6-4BC6-BA85-27AA1674824D-609-0000006ACE512151.jpg
http://i1199.photobucket.com/albums...C6-BA85-27AA1674824D-609-0000006ACE512151.jpg

D2BA42BC-D0AC-4E36-BEB1-E33CE26AE66F-609-0000006AAA0EAA36.jpg
http://i1199.photobucket.com/albums...36-BEB1-E33CE26AE66F-609-0000006AAA0EAA36.jpg

8E9B74DD-CBB8-463D-85DC-EF9730162AB2-609-0000006AD9A7A87D.jpg
http://i1199.photobucket.com/albums...3D-85DC-EF9730162AB2-609-0000006AD9A7A87D.jpg
 
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Uglydog

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#29
I still need a gusher pump for the rear of the machine and I believe I need a new contactor . It seems to be falling apart . Does anyone have a good photo of their contactor? Anyways here are some photos. I ran new wire from the inside to the mill head.
I don't have a coolant/gusher pump on my Cincy 1B.
Don't know if the "contactor" you are referring to is in reference to the pump or something else.
If you can be more specific, I'll be happy to help you with anything I can.

Daryl
MN
 

cincinnati JA

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#30
I don't have a coolant/gusher pump on my Cincy 1B.
Don't know if the "contactor" you are referring to is in reference to the pump or something else.
If you can be more specific, I'll be happy to help you with anything I can.

Daryl
MN
Hi Daryl! The contactor is the electrical switch that allows everything to work on the machine when you push the start button. It's similar to a "starter" .

When you click this
4D0DD531-FDE0-47A2-852C-4C644B3E7499-8813-000004354493DEE4.jpg

It engages this:
F504984C-D27B-4F35-BF13-42AE08E57AFE-609-0000009BD2906723.jpg
E93044F0-7624-4804-908D-EF6670589B46-609-0000009BCD841E47.jpg

I appreciate any help!


Josh
 
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