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Looking for Sanford MG-612 Surface Grinder owners

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kevin

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#1
I'm looking for Sanford MG-612 surface grinder owners who are willing to share tips and information on tooling, sources for parts, grinding wheel adapters, etc., and other useful information. Please note I am looking for information for the MG model specifically.

Very recently, I purchased a Sanford MG-612 - it's in pretty good shape, but still needs a bit of work (plus I still need to move it into my basement workshop!). I've already started a web page on my acquisition, and I'm making a record of relevant information I have found searching the Internet. Here's a link to the web page, still very much a work in progress:

https://sites.google.com/site/lagadoacademy/machining---lathes-mills-etc/my-surface-grinder

I would very much appreciate help from anyone willing to share information on things like this:
  • grinding wheel adapters - did you build or buy (where?)
  • associated tooling - wrenches, wheel removal tools, etc.
  • useful modifications or improvements you have made
  • tips, suggestions, advice, etc.
  • useful web links specific to the MG-612
Also, for those willing to share information about your specific grinder:
  • serial number
  • when purchased?
  • where purchased (city, state)
  • purchase price
  • condition when purchased, accessories included
  • photos welcome!
Finally, one more piece of information I am looking for specific to my purchase: There are no table stops on my grinder. I will be making stops, and I would like to make them similar to the original if possible. If anyone can provide pictures of table stops, I would appreciate it.
 

benmychree

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#2
I see that Sopko adaptors and other tools are mentioned, if you do not know that already, they are still in business, selling the same stuff as you sell, including the "Glare Gearnut"that you show.
 

kevin

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#3
John - Thanks for the comment. As a matter of fact, I just bought a "gear-nut wrench" from Sopko (via MSC), along with one of their wheel-pullers. I've also been in touch with Sopko via email about wheel adapters. It appears that my spindle has a non-standard taper (or at least, not a taper of 3" per foot, which is common). The email conversation is still ongoing, but once I have some useful information I will post it here.
 

benmychree

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#4
The William Sopko Company is very accommodating, and deals direct with end users besides being sold through dealers; they offer other items besides those that have been noted, including high speed endless (flat) belts, special screws for mounting internal grinding wheels, and other grinding accessories that I can't recall just now. I have not used the gear nut mounting personally but do have a number of their wheel hubs, including one with a balance feature, the combination wrench and wheel puller that I use both with my B&S Micromaster surface grinder and my #1 Norton cutter grinder.
 

kevin

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#5
I've been corresponding with Sopko via email, and the conversation has been very helpful. I'm looking to buy additional adapters for my machine, and with Sopko's help I was able to determine that the spindle taper on my machine is TPF=2.787" (or there-abouts). Unfortunately for me, this is a non-standard spindle taper and Sopko has confirmed that they do not have anything in their catalog to match it. They have offered to inspect my current adapter and offer me a quote for a custom adapter, and I am thinking this over.

Meanwhile, I am hoping to find other Sanford MG owners to see what they have done about this. I haven't confirmed it yet, but I think it may be that some Sanford MG machines have the standard TPF = 3", and others are like mine. If there are other Sanford MG owners with my spindle taper, I'd like to know what they did to get wheel adapters.
 

projectnut

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#6
Attached are a few pictures of my Sanford MG surface grinder. It has the serial number 1544039M. I believe the date of manufacture was 1954 in that it has the original magnetic chuck with the Sanford logo and machine dealers tags attached. The build date of the chuck is
1954. I purchased it about 7 years ago from a shop in Oshkosh Wisconsin. The owner had been doing contract repair work for Mercury Marine.. He wanted to retire and knew the only would be able to is to no longer have the machinery to continue. I do use it on a fairly regular basis. Most recently I used it to make a set of spacers for my horizontal mill arbor.

This is the way it looked when I purchased it. I have not done anything to the machine other than replace the motor bearings, change the belt, and replace a few damaged oilers and missing screws. I believe the cabinet and all parts of the machine except the spindle cover are the original color. The spindle cover may be original, but has been painted machinery grey rather than green. The green is the same color used in the Sanford advertising brochures. I believe originally the opening on the cabinet faced the rear. However since I use the cabinet to store stock and tooling I found it much more convenient to have the opening face the front.

One thing to be sure to check is the gear ratio on the spindle down feed. When I first got it I was having an awful time trying to grind to specs. It took a while to figure out the down feed gear ratio had been changed from 3 to 1 to 4 to 1. Essentially I was only feeding down .00041" per increment on the dial rather than the .0005" as the dial indicated.

I do not have any quick change hubs for the wheels. Each wheel goes directly on the spindle. I do have a number of different dressing tools including a radius dresser. As you can see I fabricated one from a 2" LB style electrical conduit body. The optional dust collector was a $2575.00 option the original owner did not purchase.

DSCF8037.JPG

DSCF8040.JPG

DSCF8085.JPG DSCF8086.JPG

A couple side notes. The bare machine originally listed for $9097.00. The cabinet was another $810.00, the work light $140.00 option, and the Walker magnetic chuck was another $1010.00. The optional table stops would have cost another $430.00, and the rear belt guard $410.00. In addition an angle dresser listed for $675.00 and a straight dresser was $194.00. I have no idea what a similar size Boyer Shultz, Norton, or Brown & Sharpe machine would have cost. To put things in perspective the Sanford was considered a "middle of the road" machine.
 
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kevin

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#7
projectnut - thanks for joining the discussion. That's a fine looking machine, it looks like it has been well taken care of; seems to have most of the original parts. Do you mind my asking what you paid for it 7 years ago?

My machine was mounted on the cabinet with the opening in front. I wasn't sure at first if it was an original cabinet, but looking at pictures of other Sanford MGs it looks the same.

That's very odd about the gear ratio on your down feed; I'll be checking mine to see if it's correct. I can't believe that Sanford would have sold your machine with a 4:1 gear ratio, so I assume someone switched it out at some point. I wonder if the change was intentional, or someone just used the only gear they could find that fit.

Does your machine have table stops? Mine does not, and I am thinking of adding some.

I'm not sure what you mean by "each wheel goes directly on the spindle." Could you take a close-up picture of a mounted wheel (with the wheel cover removed of course) to show how it is mounted? In fact, I would greatly appreciate it if you could take a few more close-up pictures of the machine generally; the pictures you already provided are great, but it's hard to make out some of the fine details.

I ask a lot of questions, don't I? I guess no good deed goes unpunished ;-)
 

Bob Korves

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#8
What kind of table stops are worth $430? Those I have to see, are they solid gold?
 

kevin

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#10
This is a promised update on custom wheel adapters from Sopko: In an email exchange with Sopko, they said that if I would send them the wheel adapter from my machine, they could look at it and quote me a price for a custom adapter (and they said they would put my adapter in return mail the next day). They did give me a ballpark figure for a custom item as around $450, but keep in mind this is given without looking at my adapter. I'm planning to follow up on this in a few months, and get an actual quote, unless I can find someone who already supplies an adapter for my machine (which does not seem likely at this point).

I'm also thinking that if I can find some other Sanford MG owners with a similar need, we can perhaps pool our purchases into a single order and get a better price for a small production run. This is just speculation on my part - I have not asked Sopko about this.

I want to add that the Sopko people were very prompt and helpful in responding to my emails; seems like a nice company to do business with.
 

projectnut

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#12
What kind of table stops are worth $430? Those I have to see, are they solid gold?
The prices I was referring to in my previous post came from the link provided in Kevin's latest post. I had downloaded this information years ago, but neglected to keep a link to the website. The information is from quote #2:

http://www.d-and-d.com/misc/MANUALS/Sanford/

Note the form was created in 1992 and was valid through 1996 so these are not the prices paid by the original owner of my machine, who most likely purchased it in the 1950's.

My machine does not have table stops. I can understand why at the prices Sanford was charging. Even in 1954 they would have been expensive. Another reason for the opening in the cabinet is that many of the machines could have been purchased with a "wet grinding attachment" I have seen pictures of some with the tank and pump inside the cabinet.

I'm assuming the change from a 3/1 ration to a 4/1 ratio on the down feed was intentional. As I recall the shop I purchased it from was using it to grind spacers for the lower units of Mercury inboard/ outboard drives.

Now to the heart of the matter. I originally stated "the wheel goes directly on the spindle". When I purchased the machine I was told the wheel hub couldn't be removed from the spindle. In my haste to take the machine home I didn't ask any more questions about mounting the wheels. I "assumed" the owner meant the hub was part of the spindle. Now 7 years later I realized he in all likelihood what he meant was that he couldn't remove the hub from the spindle.

This conversation made me a bit curious as to how I would balance the wheel(s) if needed. So far I haven't balanced any of the wheels I have, and have gotten what I would consider an "acceptable" finish. The finish isn't mirror smooth on some materials, but I attributed that to the machine being over 60 years old.

Yesterday I started disassembling the machine and here's what I found. First I removed an end cap that was pressed into the end of the spindle. I should have taken a photo prior to removing it, but it's now hiding somewhere in the shop. I heard it ricochet a couple times, but as always it's final resting place is currently unknown. As you can see there is a nut holding the spindle to the arbor. I removed the wheel nut, spacer, and wheel guard to expose the complete hub.. As the previous owner mentioned the hub would not come off the arbor, at least not without a little persuasion. I didn't want to beat on anything so I got a gear puller out of the cabinet and set it up to attempt to remove the hub. A couple turns later and a heart sinking POP and the hub was free.

I can understand why the previous owner said it was permanent. There was a good coating of rust between the arbor and hub on both tapers. I was able to polish both the hub and arbor as seen in pictures in the next post.

Here are some photos of the wheel and mounting. Note the spanner wrench sitting on the vise is a Sopko brand # 9-424. It didn't come with the machine, but rather was purchased from a used equipment dealer.

IMG_0647.JPG IMG_0648.JPG IMG_0649.JPG IMG_0650.JPG
 

projectnut

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#13
Here are some additional pictures of the spindle and hub. I haven't done a critical measurement of the spindle taper, but with a cursory check I believe it is the standard 3 TPF.

IMG_0651.JPG IMG_0653.JPG IMG_0654.JPG

Note the flanged ring sitting on the vise in the pictures. I believe it's supposed to be a retainer for the spindle bearing. There is a threaded hole for a set screw, but there doesn't seem to be much room between the spindle housing and the retainer for an Allen wrench.
 

Bob Korves

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kevin

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#15
projectnut - great set of pictures - thanks!

If you have time please measure that taper and confirm the TPF; it may be 3" but it may be like mine (I can't be the only one!). I'm hoping to find other Sanford owners with the same non-standard taper as me, who might be willing to get together on a custom buy from Sopko.

Is your adapter left or right hand thread? Sopko says it should be LH, but some people use RH anyway.

I can't tell from your pictures whether your wheel adapter is internally threaded for a puller, but I would guess that it is. I bought the puller from MSC and it works perfectly with my adapter. The spindle nut looks like it might be shop made; all the other Sanford I have seen so far use a 7/8" hex nut (https://www.mscdirect.com/product/details/05924006). The hex nut requires a special thin-walled socket, but some people just grind down a standard socket.

Here's my spindle (before cleanup); TPF =2.787" (not standard). Looks like what might be your flange on the left end of the taper.

IMAG0292-spindle.jpg

Here's my adapter (puller tool just above wheel). My adapter uses something called a "glare gear nut" and requires a special gear wrench to crack it open. You can see the internal threads on the wheel adapter, where the puller screws in. The threads on my gear nut are LH. The grinding wheel in the picture is a once-upon-a-time 7" wheel which has been worn down to 4.9".

IMAG0297-adapter-puller.jpg

I've seen a number of people say they never balance their wheels (but they do dress them). One source I found (lost the link, sorry) said wheels 7" and under don't typically need to be balanced. Others I have read say to get the best possible finish you need to balance. My concluysion is that it is possible to get a perfectly acceptable grind without balancing, although "acceptable" may not be the best the machine is capable of.


For the complete album of all my Sanford photos, look here : https://photos.app.goo.gl/DxA0ndhxk4dyiMED2
For my web page, look here: https://sites.google.com/site/lagadoacademy/machining---lathes-mills-etc/my-surface-grinder
 

kevin

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#16
Here's more questions for the group:

I just removed the column cover, and got a look at the vertical feed gears (picture below). On my machine, there is no oiler, or provision for lubrication, that I can see. The gears look dry as a bone to me, so if they were ever lubricated it was a long time ago. The Harvey LG (supposedly a "copy" of the Sanford MG) has a top oiler for these gears.

Sanford MG owners: Do you lubricate these gears? If so, how, and what lubrication do you use?

IMAG0342-gears.jpg
 

projectnut

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#18
Here's a little more information on my machine. The small end of the spindle taper is .687". The large end is 1.000" The length of the taper is 1.275". There is no provision on the hub for balancing the wheel. In Kevin's last set of photos the gear type adaptor on the rear of the wheel appears to be for balancing. Also there is a flanged ring set screwed to the spindle at the shoulder of the taper that appears to be a dust guard rather than a bearing retainer.

The hub removal tool sounds like a great idea, however there are only 2 full threads on the inside bore on my hub. I believe they would have stripped out long before the hub popped loose from the spindle. The threads on the spindle that retain the hub are left hand. The ones on the hub that retain the wheel are right hand. As for the spindle nut, Travers Tool Co. and other suppliers sell both hex and slotted nuts.

While the taper on my spindle may be standard (haven't done the math yet), I'm not sure the spindle itself is original. When I removed the hub I could plainly see one of the spindle bearings recessed in the housing about 1/2". I could clearly read MRC 205SZZ Made in USA Pat. Pending printed on the seal. First off I don't believe the 205 series bearings are high precision, plus when I Googled them I found they are metric. They are listed as having a 25 mm ID. Maybe that's close enough. to be used for a 1" bore, but I don't think metric bearings were even available in this country in 1954.

As for oiling of the vertical feed gears, take a look at the 3rd picture in my first post. My machine has 2 Gits type brass oilers on top of the column. One is directly over each of the gears. I just put a few drops of oil in each before using the machine.

One last observation. If the Harvey machine is really a copy of the Sanford I can see why the table stop option was expensive. The front of the table is plain, so the T slot channel and stop blocks would be part of what would need to be ordered. Also the stop mechanism bolted to the way cover appears to be cast. I'm sure that's why it was a rarely ordered option. I would think almost any shop could fabricate 10 stop systems for less than it would cost to purchase 1 from Sanford. Over the years I have used at least a dozen different brands and models of surface grinders. About the only ones I've seen where table stops are used regularly are the hydraulic auto feed ones.
 

kevin

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#19
projectnut -

I calculate your TPF = (1−.687)÷1.275×12 = 2.946", or essentially TPF=3" allowing for the inaccuracies of measuring taper with a caliper; I'm guessing your spindle is original, but certainly not the metric bearings.

You may be interested in this:

https://www.vxb.com/2-Angular-Contact-Bearing-7205B-25x52x15-p/kit1088.htm

Note the related comment: Reviewer: John From Wallingford from Wallingford CT - I use this in a Sanford Model MG612 surface grinder. The grinder calls for high precision ABEC class 7 bearings costing in the neighborhood of $300.00 for the set. But in a non production shop these are just perfect and I can still grind to withing 0.0005"

I don't believe my gear type adapter has any balancing function. I took it apart and took some pictures to give you a better look at it. I bought the gear nut wrench from Sopko via MSC - it came with a spare "glare gear nut" and "glare washer" both of which fit my adapter. I'm thinking the main part of the adapter could be made without too much difficulty, and the gear nut and washer can be purchased, so this might be another way to come up with additional adapters (not a problem for you, as you have a standard taper).

IMAG0347-gear-wrench-01.jpg
IMAG0347-gear-wrench-02.jpg
IMAG0347-gear-wrench-03.jpg

Would you mind taking a closeup picture of your top oilers? What kind of oil do you use in them? Are they original to the machine or added later?

Note: I see what appear to be similar oilers in some of the advertising pictures (but not in others) - maybe Sanford started adding them at some point?
 

Bob Korves

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#20
The hub removal tool sounds like a great idea, however there are only 2 full threads on the inside bore on my hub. I believe they would have stripped out long before the hub popped loose from the spindle. The threads on the spindle that retain the hub are left hand. The ones on the hub that retain the wheel are right hand. As for the spindle nut, Travers Tool Co. and other suppliers sell both hex and slotted nuts.
The taper on those spindles is quite conical and the wheel adapters should come off easily. I can usually take mine off almost without a wrench. The wheel adapters do not need to be cranked on to the spindle really tight. If there is rust on the spindle taper or in the wheel adapter, then that needs to be addressed carefully, because spindle taper runout should be held to very tight tolerances, not more than .0001". Please do not take sandpaper or a file to it.

If the wheel turns clockwise as viewed by the operator, then the spindle thread and the wheel adapter flange nut should both be left hand thread. A two tooth washer fits into slots in the wheel adapter, and mounts between the grinding wheel and the threaded flange. A surface grinder should not be used with that washer missing. They are cheap and easy to purchase. The flange and wheel can easily depart the wheel adapter without the toothed washer present. In a pinch, a right hand threaded wheel adapter can be used on a clockwise turning wheel, but ONLY if the toothed washer is present, and that is still not a recommended procedure (though it does seem to work.)
http://www.wmsopko.com/sopko_045_78.htm bottom of page

Wheels coming apart from crashes or cracks in them, thrown parts or wheels, and spinning wheels contacting body parts are the biggest dangers around a surface grinder, and all can be debilitating or fatal. Y'all be careful out there...
 

kevin

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#21
My spindle had just a bit of light rust on it - more of a tarnish really. I cleaned it up with a brief application of Scotchbrite (Very Fine).

My Sanford MG (Ser. # 1561323 M) has an non-standard taper, and I'm still looking to find someone else whose machine has the same taper. I'm also curious to see if machines made in different years had different tapers. I'm assuming the MG serial numbers follow the same patter as Sanford SG serial numbers (http://www.lathes.co.uk/sanford/), which would mean my machine was made in 1956 (the first two digits are the year of manufacture, unless the first digit is is 1, in which case disregard the 1).

projectnut - that would confirm your machine serial number 1544039M was made in 1954.
 

projectnut

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#22
Correction from my last post. There are 3 spring loaded oilers on top of the column. One for each of the ways the wheel assembly moves on, and one over the large miter gear.

Like Kevin I also used a very fine (blue) Scotchbrite pad to remove the rust from the spindle and hub. As for the toothed washer, my current hub has only a single tooth, not two as in the link Bob provided. I'm not sure if the hub I have came with the machine is the original or an after market one. It does have right hand threads for the nut holding the wheel to the hub. I would think this arrangement would be better suited for a machine that has a counter clockwise wheel rotation. About the only ones I know that do are the old Delta Toolmakers. I've never used one, but I've always wanted one where the head could be swiveled for odd size pieces

Here are a couple pictures of the top of the column with the oilers. The manual recommends 10W oil for all the various oils.

IMG_0657.JPG IMG_0658.JPG

ON EDIT: I was just reading through the manual and realized the hub on my machine is not original unless it was a special order. The manual states the nut holding the wheel should be turned clockwise to remove it. This means it would have left hand threads. My wheel retainer nut has right hand threads.
 
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kevin

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#23
projectnut -

I'm still thinking that those oilers may have been added later by a previous owner. I took another close look at the column cover for my Sanford MG and do not see any indication that there were ever any oilers in the top (no oilers, no holes visible inside or out, no sign of holes that have been plugged). I have heard the theory before that it is better not to oil/grease these gears because it just traps grinding grit and increases wear; the fact that these gears are essentially fully enclosed by the column cover might support that idea, but I'm not sure I buy it. On the other hand, if the vertical feed gears on my machine have been lubricated at all in the last 50 years, I don't see any sign of it. The Harvey LG "copy" of the Sanford MG has oilers on top, so Harvey must have thought it was a good idea; I'll probably add some eventually, but another few months isn;t going to make a difference.

I assume you are looking at the manual that is posted at http://www.d-and-d.com/misc/MANUALS/Sanford/ regarding lubrication and the recommendation to use 10W (machine oil I assume, not motor oil). I had a lengthy discussion with another Sanford MG owner on this topic, and I think we both decided to use Vactra 2 way oil (or any ISO 68 way oil; emphasize way oil, not machine oil). I came to this decision after looking at the Grizzly manual for their (somewhat similar) surface grinder: http://www.grizzly.com/products/6-x-12-Surface-Grinder-w-Stand/G5963 (the manual is here: http://cdn0.grizzly.com/manuals/g5963_m.pdf

The 7/8" hex spindle nut on my machine has LH threads. Another Sanford owner I traded email with has a machine with a standard spindle taper of TPF=3",and also has the same LH spindle nut. So far I only have a bit of information on 5 different Sanford MGs - not near enough yet to get an idea of what was standard for the machines, and how that may have changes over time (all the machines I have info on are from the 1950s). The one Harvey LG I have info on has a TPF=3" with a LH thread spindle nut.
 

kevin

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#24
Here's another bit of trivia for Sanford MG owners. A company called Micromech Mfg. Corp. made a machine based on the Sanford MG (which leads me to believe Micromech may have acquired Sanford assets when it went out of business); picture below. You can see more pictures of the machine here: https://hgrinc.com/productDetail/Ma...omech-Mfg.-Corp.-Surface-Grinder/12160170004/

The machine is listed as a "surface grinder", but it was actually marketed as a wafer cutting machine (which explains the otherwise odd spindle design in the pictures).

micro-mech-wmsa-wafer-cutter.jpg
 

projectnut

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#25
projectnut -

I'm still thinking that those oilers may have been added later by a previous owner. I took another close look at the column cover for my Sanford MG and do not see any indication that there were ever any oilers in the top (no oilers, no holes visible inside or out, no sign of holes that have been plugged). I have heard the theory before that it is better not to oil/grease these gears because it just traps grinding grit and increases wear; the fact that these gears are essentially fully enclosed by the column cover might support that idea, but I'm not sure I buy it. On the other hand, if the vertical feed gears on my machine have been lubricated at all in the last 50 years, I don't see any sign of it. The Harvey LG "copy" of the Sanford MG has oilers on top, so Harvey must have thought it was a good idea; I'll probably add some eventually, but another few months isn;t going to make a difference.

I assume you are looking at the manual that is posted at http://www.d-and-d.com/misc/MANUALS/Sanford/ regarding lubrication and the recommendation to use 10W (machine oil I assume, not motor oil). I had a lengthy discussion with another Sanford MG owner on this topic, and I think we both decided to use Vactra 2 way oil (or any ISO 68 way oil; emphasize way oil, not machine oil). I came to this decision after looking at the Grizzly manual for their (somewhat similar) surface grinder: http://www.grizzly.com/products/6-x-12-Surface-Grinder-w-Stand/G5963 (the manual is here: http://cdn0.grizzly.com/manuals/g5963_m.pdf

The 7/8" hex spindle nut on my machine has LH threads. Another Sanford owner I traded email with has a machine with a standard spindle taper of TPF=3",and also has the same LH spindle nut. So far I only have a bit of information on 5 different Sanford MGs - not near enough yet to get an idea of what was standard for the machines, and how that may have changes over time (all the machines I have info on are from the 1950s). The one Harvey LG I have info on has a TPF=3" with a LH thread spindle nut.
Just the designation SAE (Society of Automotive Engineers) leads me to believe the manual is referring to motor oil. I have had this discussion with retired engineers formerly employed by Sheldon, Gisholt, Cincinnati, and Kearney & Trecker. Almost to a person they feel current day motor oils are far better than the machine oils recommended from the 1940's thru the 1960's. I have even had the person from Sheldon recommend replacing all formerly recommended machine lubrication oils with current day SAE 10W-30. I have followed their recommendations on all of my machines. I do still have a couple gallons of Vactra #2 way oil I use on the milling machines, but other than that I use current day single or multi viscosity motor oils. I've had some of the machines over 20 years with no ill effects. In that time I would guess most machines have run an average of 10- 15 hours per week. Some weeks it's far more, some weeks it's far less. There have been times when I was trying to complete big jobs and either a lathe or one of the mills has run over 60 hours. Now that I'm a little older I don't care to work that long or hard.
 

Andy Pullen

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#26
Hi All,
I picked up a Sanford MG grinder from a machine shop "yard sale" a couple of weeks ago. There were 2 of them there. Thankfully, my coworker that attended the sale with me got the other one. Each machine went for $50. Attached is a photo in the shop it was in. The wiring was pretty much shot on both machines and the belts were coming apart like $2 suits.
I don't know anything about the previous owner. It was a little tool and die shop in a former industrial neighborhood in Baltimore city. I never would have known the place was there otherwise.
The machine got a once over when I got it home and the majority of the accumulated dust and crud was scraped and brushed off.
I found a new belt on eBay and replaced the power cords on my machine. Turns out the starting capacitor on my motor was bad. That was replaced yesterday and the motor now is fine. But, the spindle barely turns over when the motor is turned on. Gotta take the spindle apart next and make a decision on the bearings.
The wheel guard is on the machine. My coworker has the chip guard for the left end of the table.
I'm looking forward to running this little machine. There's no room in my shop for anything much bigger.
Andy Pullen
 

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kevin

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#27
projectnut -

With regard to lubrication, I'm a complete novice when it comes to surface grinding, so I bow to your superior experience.

Andy - got your email to me, and glad to see you joining us here. I look forward to seeing more pictures of your machine (and your co-worker's too, if possible). When you take the spindle appart, I hope you will take lots of pictures!

To anyone else who happens to find this discussion, I'm trying to collect all the information I can find on the Sanford MG (and related), and summarize it at the link below, so any additions are welcome. Right now I have some info on six machines, but I'd like to see a lot more.

https://sites.google.com/site/lagadoacademy/machining---lathes-mills-etc/my-surface-grinder
 

Andy Pullen

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#28
projectnut -


Andy - got your email to me, and glad to see you joining us here. I look forward to seeing more pictures of your machine (and your co-worker's too, if possible). When you take the spindle appart, I hope you will take lots of pictures!
I will take plenty of photos. Don't worry.
 

projectnut

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#29
projectnut -

With regard to lubrication, I'm a complete novice when it comes to surface grinding, so I bow to your superior experience.

Andy - got your email to me, and glad to see you joining us here. I look forward to seeing more pictures of your machine (and your co-worker's too, if possible). When you take the spindle appart, I hope you will take lots of pictures!

To anyone else who happens to find this discussion, I'm trying to collect all the information I can find on the Sanford MG (and related), and summarize it at the link below, so any additions are welcome. Right now I have some info on six machines, but I'd like to see a lot more.

https://sites.google.com/site/lagadoacademy/machining---lathes-mills-etc/my-surface-grinder
I don't claim to be a lubrication expert either. I'm just going by what I was told from people in the business. I worked in the engineering department of a major food company for over 20 years. Our department designed, built, and installed proprietary processing and packaging machinery for our company. The machines ranged in size from smaller than a bread box to multi story 200+ foot long monsters. We did have a lubrication engineer on staff. It was his job to analyze the needs and recommend lubricants. He also regularly monitored and tested the lubricants to be sure those recommended would work under the harsh conditions. In most any case other than areas where there was potential exposure to the product some type of automobile lubricant was preferred.
 

kevin

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#30
projectnut -

With regard to lubrication, I'm a complete novice when it comes to surface grinding, so I bow to your superior experience.

Andy - got your email to me, and glad to see you joining us here. I look forward to seeing more pictures of your machine (and your co-worker's too, if possible). When you take the spindle appart, I hope you will take lots of pictures!

To anyone else who happens to find this discussion, I'm trying to collect all the information I can find on the Sanford MG (and related), and summarize it at the link below, so any additions are welcome. Right now I have some info on six machines, but I'd like to see a lot more.

https://sites.google.com/site/lagadoacademy/machining---lathes-mills-etc/my-surface-grinder
 
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