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Low temp aluminum welding

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aliva

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I just saw an add for low temp aluminum welding rods. I have the occasional need to weld aluminum 3/8' max. I was looking into purchasing a TIG for this but came across a few low temp aluminum rods.
Below are a couple of sites with their products. Just wondering if anyone has any experience with these products, whether they actually work or are they worth the buy. Any input would be welcomed


 

Latinrascalrg1

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Ive not used this brand in particular however i have used maybe 4 or 5 other brands including the Harbor Freight variety which have come in very handy in my experience. The most important aspect when using this product is to remember that the heat from the parent material is what melts the alum-a-weld rods for the repair, NOT the torch flame! This can be a problem for very thin repair areas however there are ways to work through this so it's not impossible. For instance, the use of heat sink blocking to take the majority of the direct flame from the torch in order to safely and effectively transfers the required heat into the thin repair area thru direct contact. This will allow the repair rod material to flow out nicely for the repair and also provides a solid backing surface to fill in missing pieces and holes more easily if needed.
 

Briney Eye

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I just saw an add for low temp aluminum welding rods. I have the occasional need to weld aluminum 3/8' max. I was looking into purchasing a TIG for this but came across a few low temp aluminum rods.
Below are a couple of sites with their products. Just wondering if anyone has any experience with these products, whether they actually work or are they worth the buy. Any input would be welcomed


I have used the BernzOmatic aluminum "brazing" rods from Lowe's with a MAPP torch. It's really more like soldering. It's pretty easy on square tubing and the heavier angle (also from Lowe's). Thin angle is very easy to burn through. Just heat the stock until the rod "wets" when you touch it. I built a hanging overhead rack with it and a couple of other little things with good results.
 

alloy

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Has anyone used these on aluminum casting like transmission parts? I've looked and don't see anything online about others using them on castings.

If they work on a casting it will open up my capabilities as far as modifying transmission housings go.
 

Latinrascalrg1

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If a cast transfer housing qualifies then yes i had good success with this type of product on a broken housing bolt flange.
 

alloy

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Thanks for your reply.

I modify transmission tail housings by putting in a sleeve I make out of 6061 to create a cable speedometer drive in transmissions that don't have them.

So I'd be trying to weld 6061 to the casting and have no leaks of transmission fluid and enough strength for it to hold together.
 

Latinrascalrg1

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Thanks for your reply.

I modify transmission tail housings by putting in a sleeve I make out of 6061 to create a cable speedometer drive in transmissions that don't have them.

So I'd be trying to weld 6061 to the casting and have no leaks of transmission fluid and enough strength for it to hold together.
Just keep in mind that your outcomes may vary based on the materials and weld stick formula you are using so if one brand doesnt work dont just give up, try a different brand, you will find one that will work for you.
 

alloy

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Thanks again, I'm learning a lot today. I kinda have heard of these products before but never had a need for them.

I didn't realize there would be a difference in brands, but it makes sense there would be. I think I'll start with the HF band and see how that goes and do some research on other brands.

This one looks promising. Says it works on castings.

 
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Latinrascalrg1

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I should also warn you that the repaired area will tend to be harder then the parent material so be mindful when grinding back to clean things up so that you dont cut away the 2 surfaces at different rates.
 

FOMOGO

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I've heard good things about Muggy Weld products. Looks like a good route for those who don't have, or want to invest in expensive equipment, and just need to do occasional metal attachment or repair. I learned to do aluminum welding 50 years ago when taking a course on refrigeration repair. O/A torch on aluminum tubing. A little tricky at first, but like anything else a little practice, and I got pretty good at it. Mike
 

alloy

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I'm going to try a few different things and see how it goes. I've accumulated some housings I can't even give away so they are good candidates for me to experiment on.

I have a tig welder and gave it a really good shot at learning on my own. But it went off course and just couldn't get the stack of dimes look. I don't have the time to take a class. In my area they are only offered during week nights and I already get up at 4 am for work and home at 6 pm.

I've heard from welders that trying to weld a housing that has been soaked in oil is very problematic. The oil keeps coming out of the material and makes for a bad weld. I'm wondering if it will be the same with the low temp rod.

Just found this. Pretty amazing.

 

Hawkeye

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I recently broke the cast aluminum lever on the fence on my 1948 table saw (dropped it). I used an aluminum brazing rod to put the two pieces back together. It isn't showing any sign of weakening in use. You have to give it a tug to unlock the fence. I wouldn't have been comfortable using the MIG spool gun to try the repair.
 

john.k

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I believe the rods are mostly tin plus a bit of silver....and of course secret ingredients..........however ,if you subsequently need to re do the repair,the filler is poison to TIG deposit...........the repairs are not resistant to corrosion either ,having dissimilar metals.
 

pontiac428

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Yep, it's a tin filler rod. I have had very poor success with low temp aluminum trying to repair cast automotive components. The typical failure I encounter is a broken bolt ear, whether on a carburetor, a transmission housing, or a small engine control component. Every repair I have made of that type with low temp has broken immediately, and I end up doing the repair with JB Weld. I put JB on a carburetor mounting flange and it held for almost 20 years (could still be holding, but I sold the truck). Maybe probably I have been doing something wrong in the low-temp process, but I avoid it like taxes if at all possible.
 
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