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Lube for rebuilding machines.

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agfrvf

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#1
I have built several engines in the past and have used moly based engine assembly lube. I was thinking of using it on my mill rebuild.

Is molybednium bad for cast iron or something?

Should I use it?

Why is it not it the different oils?
 

Richard King 2

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#2

magicniner

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#3
Molybednium might be bad for for Cast Iron, Molybdenum Di-Sulphide is fine for Iron and Iron alloys, it is available in a aerosol assembly spray specifically for engine and machine assembly.
 

Bob Korves

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#4
Grease is not good where there is grit or chips. Mixed together they make lapping paste. So for ball and roller bearings, rotating shafts in bushings, and other places that grit is excluded from by very good sealing, grease is OK. For other parts and sliding ways, oil is usually called for. You do not mention what type, brand, or size of machine you are speaking of, just that it is a mill, or where you want to lube. The first thing to do is to get a factory manual for the machine and then follow the recommendations given by the builder.
 

magicniner

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#5
Bob - Engine Rebuild - you would never use Grease in an oil lubricated engine rebuild as it could reduce or block oil flow at start up when good flow of oil is most important.

Moly is a standard for this, Graphite use to be the thing but it's a little out of date.

Again, Engines, not Machines.
 

Bob Korves

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#7
I have used moly assembly grease for rebuilding engines, back in the day, a very light coat on the bearings, wrist pins, oil pump gears, etc. Not on the pistons and rings. That was SOP in the 60's until I was out of the field in the '80's. It worked...
 

Tozguy

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#8
I have built several engines in the past and have used moly based engine assembly lube. I was thinking of using it on my mill rebuild.

Is molybednium bad for cast iron or something?

Should I use it?

Why is it not it the different oils?
I'd say the moly engine assembly lube is too good for the mill but it won't hurt it. It is not a grease folks.
The moly is an extreme pressure additive that is needed in crank journals, cam shafts, etc. until oil under pressure reaches these critical areas to replace it. It is a relatively expensive additive.
It is doubtful that the pressure between metal parts in a mill comes anywhere near those in a internal combustion engine so the moly additive is simply not necessary, but will not hurt it.
 

Tozguy

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#10
Molybednium might be bad for for Cast Iron, Molybdenum Di-Sulphide is fine for Iron and Iron alloys, it is available in a aerosol assembly spray specifically for engine and machine assembly.
How many millions of engine blocks were made out of cast iron and does the label on the moly assembly lube warn against using it in them?
 

4GSR

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#11
I have used moly assembly grease for rebuilding engines, back in the day, a very light coat on the bearings, wrist pins, oil pump gears, etc. Not on the pistons and rings. That was SOP in the 60's until I was out of the field in the '80's. It worked...
I will on occasion, use General Lubriplate engine assembly grease on certain machine components. It's light enough, that when oil is added to the assembly in normal lubrication of the machine, it will wash out by the oil. Most of the time, I grab the nearest oil can and dab a little oil on the parts being assembled.

Ken
 

Bob Korves

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#12
The main lube I used for engine assembly is Lubripate 105. It is a thin off white lithium grease that comes in a large plastic squeeze tube. It has lots of other uses as well. I have several old partial tubes in my box of lubes. The label says "motor assembly lube."
 

Silverbullet

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#13
I too use white lithium on rebuilds of small engines , even on car and equipment machines. It's been a mainstay forever . After boring and honing I wipe the cylinder with it and use oil when inserting the piston . Never ever had a failure or a seize up . Valve guides are a different story , I have a can of B&S valve guide lube been using it for forty years and there's nothing better for them. It's suppose to stay slick even hot.
I would use a good machine oil for machinery the lubes are made for certain jobs. Some are tacky to stick, gear oil or bar oil. Others to hold particles to float to a filter ,car engine oils HD 10 wt. Machine oils made to move chips away with wipers , yes use the right lube for the job . In a pinch I'd use a light oil but I'd be getting the right stuff.
 
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