[4]

Machinist-Style Haircut???

[3]
[10] Like what you see?
Click here to donate to this forum and upgrade your account!

The Liberal Arts Garage

Active User
H-M Supporter - Gold Member ($25)
Joined
Sep 4, 2013
Messages
494
Just another note--- I recommended placing the switch (or a redundant one)
where you can reach it with your left hand while your ears are between centers
My original note is some where in "Safety" long ago. Giant Red button ?
.........BLJHB
 

magicniner

H-M Supporter - Silver Member
H-M Supporter - Silver Member ($10)
Joined
Oct 21, 2017
Messages
462
Just another note--- I recommended placing the switch (or a redundant one)
where you can reach it with your left hand while your ears are between centers
My original note is some where in "Safety" long ago. Giant Red button ?
.........BLJHB
Kick bar? Far easier to find when you're wrestling something that wants to eat you ;-)
 

microshop dinker

New Member
Registered
Joined
Dec 18, 2013
Messages
23
Glad you only lost some hair; reminds me of my younger years and telling the barber "just a little off the top, please." Lesson learned. Your pic reminds me of an incident in the mid 70's when I was enrolled in a machine shop course at the local trade school. Young girl working at the Standard-Modern lathe next to me had her long red hair hanging over her shoulder. My attention was drawn to her when I heard her cry out and turned just in time to see a long tress with a patch of bloody scalp winding around the feed screw just as her head hit the ways on her way to the concrete floor. I almost lost my lunch, the instructor lost his job. "Lesson learned" again. I tightened my act up a lot after that.
 
Reactions: TTD

dewbane

Michael McIntyre
Registered
Joined
Mar 2, 2018
Messages
52
Thanks for the timely reminder of how fast it all goes south. I normally take a moment to visualize how a machine is going to maim or kill me and focus before I hit the power switch, but this thread has made me take stock and realize that I need to dial up the humility a couple of notches myself. Good cautionary tale. I'm glad you're only a little worse for wear.
 

Skowinski

H-M Supporter - Gold Member
H-M Supporter - Gold Member ($25)
Joined
Nov 9, 2017
Messages
115
I remember being in a machine shop for the first time. The machinist leading me around showed me a milling machine and told me you could cut a finger off quickly and easily. Then he showed me a lathe, and said this machine will kill you.

He was probably simplifying things a bit, but the lesson stuck with me, respect lathes and be careful.
 

Creativechipper

H-M Supporter - Silver Member
H-M Supporter - Silver Member ($10)
Joined
Jul 9, 2018
Messages
206
Thanks for the post!!

It's a good thing to have a heavy dose of respect and a good portion of fear for what could go wrong.

I know there are many reasons I don't rush into things with the lathe. Now it may take me even longer, all this really gives me the hebejibis.

It was the wood jointer in my shop class from high school, teacher left the blood stains on the ceiling and said it will take your fingers, its happened.

Then someone crossed left hand to hold something for the "radical arm saw" and used right hand to pull the cut, ouch!!

I pray everyone has a safe time in the shop.
 

Winegrower

H-M Supporter - Silver Member
H-M Supporter - Silver Member ($10)
Joined
Jul 29, 2014
Messages
185
Yes, an excellent reminder periodically is something I need. The tip to file left-handed is one I will adopt.
 

682bear

Active Member
Registered
Joined
Nov 28, 2016
Messages
264
As previously stated... don't apologize for using humor to deal with the mistake... AFTER it happens, all you can do is laugh about it... and learn from the mistake. BEFORE it happens is the only time to prevent it.

And thanks for posting this... we all need reminders from time to time.

-Bear
 

vtcnc

Administrator
Staff member
H-M Platinum Supporter ($50)
Joined
Jun 29, 2014
Messages
394
My friend was killed down at Beth Steel years back . Chuck jaws on a very large lathe grabbed him . From what I heard , it wasn't pretty . Consider yourself very lucky that hair pulled out !

http://articles.baltimoresun.com/1991-08-22/news/1991234019_1_bethlehem-steel-lathe-steel-employees
Just read this article. Talk about an unsafe workplace! That many workplace deaths in such a short period of time seems impossible. Terrible that people lose their lives working for others. I would think the management there would do something about that.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

hermetic

Active User
Registered
Joined
May 2, 2011
Messages
502
you can see from my avatar pic that I have frizzy hair, well that was in 83, today I have dreadlocks! whenever I work with anything that rotates, all my hair goes in a long "snood" and that goes down the back of my short sleved shirt, I dont wear a watch or rings, and I am constantly aware that we all work with machines that could kill is in any number of interesting ways! Be carefull out there people!
 

BaronJ

Brass
Registered
Joined
Aug 7, 2018
Messages
660
Hi Guys,

Quite a few years back, I attended a course on washing machine servicing. The instructor wore a neck tie and whilst the machine was running, lent over the top and his tie dropped into the machine and caught on the drum pulley, dragging his head down onto the top of the back edge of the tub and machine case. He ended up with over 40 stitches in his face and neck plus lacerations to his hands. Since then I've always worn clip on neck ties.
 

mmcmdl

H-M Supporter - Gold Member
Staff member
H-M Supporter - Gold Member ($25)
Joined
Jan 31, 2016
Messages
1,153
Just read this article. Talk about an unsafe workplace! That many workplace deaths in such a short period of time seems impossible. Terrible that people lose their lives working for others. I would think the management there would do something about that.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
vtcnc , they had some big butt machinery down there . I'm talking BIG ! The one lathe was at least 3 stories high ! I went down on an interview just before Sammy was killed , and decided it wasn't the place for me . They did some pretty crazy stuff down there that I couldn't believe . They have been shut down for years now . I never got the exact details on Sammy's accident , but he was always safety conscience on the job . I'm thinking he must have had gloves on and a stringy chip grabbed him .

Either way , machinery doesn't recognize humans from metal , it's going to cut whatever is in its path . Stay safe ! :)
 

hermetic

Active User
Registered
Joined
May 2, 2011
Messages
502
Wneh I was 13 (53 years ago!) I went on a metalwork class trip to Park Gate Steelworks at Rotheram in Yorkshire. Watched the blast furnace being tapped and plugged, saw the men tending the open heartn furnaces, and also wathched the rolling of huge RSJ's in the rolling mil That men worked day in day out in those conditions was just amazing. To watch a furnaceman tip a bucket of water over his head, then pick up a shovel full of minerals, nod to the doorman, and two 30ft high doors to the mouth of hell open, the water on his back steams, and he spins round and launches the contents of his shovel throigh the already closing doors. Men indeed! Now that was a dangerous job.
 

NortonDommi

Active Member
Registered
Joined
Nov 15, 2016
Messages
431
I had an interesting experience two days ago. I am repurposing some steel that I built a shed frame out of som 30 years ago. The shed was dismantled last year in preparation for a new build this coming year. When I built it it was middle of Winter and I was dodging rain. Now I picked up some of the purlins that I had used and one was quite heavy and I could hear water? sloshing back and forth. This was very strange as I had welded end caps on. We are in the start of Summer now and it was a very hot day. I sloshed the liquid back and forth, propped the beam this way and that but could find no leak anywhere. I can't use it like this methinks so I decided to lop one endcap off and drain it.
Now I have a habit of never using an angle grinder without a jacket, leather apron, stout gloves and a full face shield along with hearing protection and a dust mask. This is due to having seen a few disks explode over the years.
Now it was a very hot day so I wore a forestry helmet which is a hard hat with attached mesh grill, ear muffs and a splash guard down the back of the neck. I find this great in Summer as the mesh gives protection and does not steam up. I wear safety glasses as well. The only thing I was not wearing was a dust mask as I had stuck the box in the safe place that my grandkids or an archeologist will find.
I used a Lennox Diamond 115 mm cut-off wheel on a small grinder. As the wheel penetrated the end of the beam there was a very brief hissing sound and a sheet of flame rushed out. Luckily I do not stand directly over where I am cutting so the worst of it missed me but some of it hit my right chest and shoulder and licked up the side of my face.
I now have a very close beard trim on that side, no eyelash, only a bit of eyebrow and slightly singed skin. The way it happened I think it would have been worse if I had been wearing the Lexan face shield I sometime wear.
What I poured out was a Black tacky substance that smelled like a stagnant swamp so I will assume it was a Methane gas BLEVE.
I have no Idea what the substance was but since I built the original structure between rain storms in Winter over a period of about three weeks I am wondering if something had crawled into the beam or nested in it and got trapped when I capped it.
This was certainly unexpected and I was glad I had decided to wear all the gear even though it was only a small quick job as it could have been much worse.
Yes folks if there is a next time I will do it properly and drill a hole first but I honestly thought it would only be water. Just goes to show you never know so wear the gear.
 

KBeitz

H-M Supporter - Gold Member
H-M Supporter - Gold Member ($25)
Joined
Apr 17, 2018
Messages
456
I had a brother in-law loose his pants twice to a saw-mill.
I lost a long sleeve off my shirt to a grinder years ago.
 

Janderso

Jeff Anderson
H-M Platinum Supporter ($50)
Joined
Mar 26, 2018
Messages
1,145
Yes, thanks for posting.
As I was reading through these stories, I was imaging the gore that went along with the tragic accidents that never should have happened.
I’m assuming most of us hobby machinists had some form of safety training relating to lathes and drill presses.
I’m in my 60’s, back in intermediate school and through High school we had very good shop safety training.
I’d like to ask the younger forum members about their safety awareness and training.
My sons are in their 30’s, they did not benefit from high school shop training because it was not offered.
When I bought my South Bend lathe, I told my wife, I’ll need to take off my wedding band from now on.
First time in 34 years.
 

vocatexas

Active Member
Registered
Joined
May 8, 2017
Messages
142
Years ago the wife of one of our neighbors was cranking an irrigation engine. Her long hair got caught in the exposed drive shaft. It flipped her over the shaft and slammed her into the ground. She lived, but was completely scalped. She had to wear wigs the rest of her life.
 

mcostello

Active User
Registered
Joined
Dec 29, 2013
Messages
395
Neighbor had many scrapes with farm equipment, last one killed Him. One of them was having a big JD tractor loose a PTO driveshaft loosing a long pin and sticking it through the calf of His leg and into the ground pinning Him solid and stalling the tractor. Stalling a tractor through the PTO???????. Many more stories like that, He thought they were all funny and laughed about them all the time.
 

Nogoingback

H-M Supporter - Gold Member
H-M Supporter - Gold Member ($25)
Joined
Oct 18, 2016
Messages
1,116
Just read this article. Talk about an unsafe workplace! That many workplace deaths in such a short period of time seems impossible. Terrible that people lose their lives working for others. I would think the management there would do something about that.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

Before he retired, my Dad was a Safety Engineer for Bethlehem at their South San Francisco and Pinole Point plants. This was when OSHA
was pretty new, and he said getting both the workers and management to pay attention to even basic safety practices was very difficult. It was
a very frustrating job for him, and they had some pretty awful accidents. And, of course, management didn't want to spend a dime to add
guards or railings, buy safety gear etc, etc.
 

7milesup

H-M Supporter - Gold Member
H-M Supporter - Gold Member ($25)
Joined
Jan 7, 2016
Messages
349
Yes, an excellent reminder periodically is something I need. The tip to file left-handed is one I will adopt.
Been around machines my whole life (farming, airplanes with big fans on the front) but I am confused here by the left handed filing statement. I don't understand. Could someone elaborate a little on that?
 

hman

Active User
H-M Platinum Supporter ($50)
Joined
Feb 17, 2013
Messages
1,948
"Original" source (Post #14 in this thread):
Safety Glasses, No Loose clothing, Sleeves rolled Up, No Jewelry and File Left Handed. Learned that in Junior High school.
Imagine you're at the lathe, holding a file in your right hand, with your left hand at the tip to steady it. This puts your left arm, sleeve, cuff etc. above the spinning chuck.
Now imagine holding the file in your left hand, with your right hand on the far end. Both arms are now well away from the chuck.
 

7milesup

H-M Supporter - Gold Member
H-M Supporter - Gold Member ($25)
Joined
Jan 7, 2016
Messages
349
"Original" source (Post #14 in this thread):

Imagine you're at the lathe, holding a file in your right hand, with your left hand at the tip to steady it. This puts your left arm, sleeve, cuff etc. above the spinning chuck.
Now imagine holding the file in your left hand, with your right hand on the far end. Both arms are now well away from the chuck.
Ahhh, got it. Thank you for the explanation. ;)
 

keebie1984

Newbie
Registered
Joined
Mar 11, 2018
Messages
14
I had an interesting experience two days ago. I am repurposing some steel that I built a shed frame out of som 30 years ago. The shed was dismantled last year in preparation for a new build this coming year. When I built it it was middle of Winter and I was dodging rain. Now I picked up some of the purlins that I had used and one was quite heavy and I could hear water? sloshing back and forth. This was very strange as I had welded end caps on. We are in the start of Summer now and it was a very hot day. I sloshed the liquid back and forth, propped the beam this way and that but could find no leak anywhere. I can't use it like this methinks so I decided to lop one endcap off and drain it.
Now I have a habit of never using an angle grinder without a jacket, leather apron, stout gloves and a full face shield along with hearing protection and a dust mask. This is due to having seen a few disks explode over the years.
Now it was a very hot day so I wore a forestry helmet which is a hard hat with attached mesh grill, ear muffs and a splash guard down the back of the neck. I find this great in Summer as the mesh gives protection and does not steam up. I wear safety glasses as well. The only thing I was not wearing was a dust mask as I had stuck the box in the safe place that my grandkids or an archeologist will find.
I used a Lennox Diamond 115 mm cut-off wheel on a small grinder. As the wheel penetrated the end of the beam there was a very brief hissing sound and a sheet of flame rushed out. Luckily I do not stand directly over where I am cutting so the worst of it missed me but some of it hit my right chest and shoulder and licked up the side of my face.
I now have a very close beard trim on that side, no eyelash, only a bit of eyebrow and slightly singed skin. The way it happened I think it would have been worse if I had been wearing the Lexan face shield I sometime wear.
What I poured out was a Black tacky substance that smelled like a stagnant swamp so I will assume it was a Methane gas BLEVE.
I have no Idea what the substance was but since I built the original structure between rain storms in Winter over a period of about three weeks I am wondering if something had crawled into the beam or nested in it and got trapped when I capped it.
This was certainly unexpected and I was glad I had decided to wear all the gear even though it was only a small quick job as it could have been much worse.
Yes folks if there is a next time I will do it properly and drill a hole first but I honestly thought it would only be water. Just goes to show you never know so wear the gear.
Probably H2S you were smelling deadly stuff.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk Pro
 

WalterC

Active Member
Registered
Joined
Jul 3, 2015
Messages
103
Let's see your whole scalp- wouldn't be a few more little spots here and there would there???? :grin big:


I did the same thing but with a 3 foot drill bit. That feeling of hair being pulled out of the scalp is still with me today many years later.
 

mmcmdl

H-M Supporter - Gold Member
Staff member
H-M Supporter - Gold Member ($25)
Joined
Jan 31, 2016
Messages
1,153
Another safety incident . My co-worker suffered an accident this past Wed .

A forklift driver was removing a heavy box from a very high industrial shelving unit . The fork lifted the front brace out of the frame and became jammed . My co-worker climbed up on a ladder trying to fix the brace but it snapped out and whacked him in his face . He and the ladder came down hard and he was out cold . By the time the paramedics got here his head was swelled up like basketball . He had brain surgery immediately and is now in an induced coma .

Think first and BE SAFE .
 
Last edited:

Firstgear

H-M Supporter - Gold Member
H-M Supporter - Gold Member ($25)
Joined
Dec 7, 2018
Messages
132
Company I worked for made an acquisition and I went up during the week and ran the business. One of the things I was really a stickler on was safety glasses. I used to really give people a hard time when they didnt have them on out in the shop. One of the guys was packing up some parts to send to a customer and the 2 component foam in place bag he was getting ready to use for the parts and the bag let loose. Sprayed him in the face, his safety glasses got a full dose though. He looked me up later and thanked me for insisting that they wear their safety glasses.

You cant be too careful in a shop.....
 

BGHansen

H-M Supporter - Gold Member
H-M Supporter - Gold Member ($25)
Joined
Nov 23, 2014
Messages
1,033
My dad was a high school shop teacher and would remark that a good day was when no one was hurt. He had two students injured during his career, fortunately nothing really serious. First one was a student who made a shift knob for his car and drilled out the hole for the tap at the major diameter. My dad suggested he fill the hole with lead, drill and tap. He had just washed the aluminum knob and had some water in the bottom of the hole. Poured in the lead which instantly turned the water to steam and spattered the lead on the kid's hands. Few minor burns.

Other one could have been bad. Kid was turning some stock in the lathe and had a long length sticking out of the head stock. My dad had outboard "V" supports for long stock, but the student didn't use it. The rod buckled at the back side of the head stock, whipped around and hit him on the shoulder. Really lucky it wasn't to his head. Made an 800 lbs. Clausing lathe do a dance until he hit the master power.

He did help out the home ec teacher when a boy with really long hair got it wrapped up in a mixmaster. Cut the beaters with side cutters to free him up.

He recalls the worst one being a fellow shop teacher. He was mixing polyester resin in a coffee can using a paint mixer on a drill press (?!!?). He'd done a pour and was mixing a 2nd batch. He plunged into the mix, went to the bottom of the car and stuck the mixer in the setting up first mix. Locked the can to the mixer, so now the can started spinning, throwing new polyester resin out of the can. The teacher grabbed onto the can at the top . . . Nothing lethal, but he sliced up his palms pretty well and had polyester resin in the cuts. Dad cleaned them out with lacquer thinner which probably hurt more than the cuts.

They say all accidents are preventable, but sometimes stuff happens regardless. I still wear long sleeves while working in the shop but make sure the cuffs are buttoned tight or I wear kevlar sleeves over top my shirt. Hopefully I'm not documenting one of my mishaps here.

Bruce
 

Mrlathe

Newbie
Registered
Joined
Nov 10, 2018
Messages
7
Ouch that must have hurt,lucky guy cold have been an awful lot worse.
 
[6]
[5] [7]
Top