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Mattsson & Zetterlund VF600 Restoration

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Red Baron FC

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#1
Hello. Recently I bought myself a birthday present. No need to mention that my wife was not so excited as me :) This is my first serious machine. It is Mattson & Zetterlund VF600 (small) vertical milling machine. More about this machine can be found at: http://www.lathes.co.uk/mattsson&zetterlund/ . I hope I will restore it properly so it
will shine and be used again as intended. For sure, I will need advice and help down the path, so, I will post a pictures, comments and questions here. Wish me a luck :)

There is some pictures of machine as it was when arrived.
 

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Red Baron FC

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It took me about three hours to disassemble main parts. I was able to do it by myself. At the second picture a big round hole can be seen. Through this hole screws for tightening axis nuts can be reached. To disassemble table, screw that tightens X axis nut must be loosen, completely. I was not know that at the time of disassemble, so, I was take down table with saddle. Much harder way. Although there was chip guard to protect Y axis screw the column of the machine was full of chips. It can be seen at third picture what was in the machine column. Main parts can be seen at fourth picture, table in front, small wise that was came with machine, Z axis angle adjusting housing with worm gear, spindle, X axis power feed, and Y axis saddle. Next two days was gone in removing grease and dirt from column and base of the machine.
 

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Red Baron FC

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I was need a help of a friend to move column in to the shop. Column are lighter than base. We are barely succeed to move the base. More cleaning and removing dirt and grease from base. Almost five hours, using this special chemical for this purpose, shown on first picture. Way oil is a pretty sticky thing. AKRA K2 is a nasty thing. It dissolve grease, but it soften and dissolve paint too. Whole lot of a mess just to get base of the machine at stage shown at next few pictures.
 

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Red Baron FC

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Today was sunny day, so I fulfill it with more cleaning the remaining parts from machine. Not so interesting at all. But just to say this activity swallow more four hours. Again, way oil, especially old way oil is a pretty sticky. Then rest of the day I start a rebuilding process. There is a picture of two part chip guard metal plate after cleaning. There is some rust but nothing dramatic. By the help of 200 grit water sandpaper it became almost clear enough. Third and four picture show state after sanding. I was not satisfied so, I try jeweling it. Officially my first attempt to do jeweling can be seen on fifth picture. I use 50mm blue scotch brite pad with WD-40 and move it by 25mm in both directions. Second attempt with 12.5mm moving pattern and final result. First finished part. :)
 

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Bob Korves

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#6
It looks like a nice machine for a home shop. Reading the post on lathes.co.uk and seeing it has a 30 taper spindle and is solidly built makes it all the more interesting.
 

bl00

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I like the jeweling. That looks nice! There's a good post on the Svenska Elektonikforumet showing a conversion to cnc. It has plenty of pics of the machine apart which is useful even without the cnc part. You may need to join to see pics: http://elektronikforumet.com/forum/viewtopic.php?f=3&t=71104

I converted the manual to English, but lost it to a hard drive crash. I started over, but haven't added in the images, yet. Send me a message with your email address if you want a copy.

Here's what mine looks like-

 

Red Baron FC

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I like the jeweling. That looks nice! There's a good post on the Svenska Elektonikforumet showing a conversion to cnc. It has plenty of pics of the machine apart which is useful even without the cnc part. You may need to join to see pics: http://elektronikforumet.com/forum/viewtopic.php?f=3&t=71104

I converted the manual to English, but lost it to a hard drive crash. I started over, but haven't added in the images, yet. Send me a message with your email address if you want a copy.

Here's what mine looks like-

 

Red Baron FC

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Thank you for your replay. I plan to convert it to CNC, some day. :) but for now, I do now want to bite something that I can not chew :)
 

hman

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#10
O, off topic ... but how crazy is it that here on the forum we have a Serbian and an American discussing a (relatively obscure, from what I understand from lathes.co.uk) Swedish machine tool that they both own?

I'm just waiting for an Australian or east Asian member to chime in and say he has one, too! :)
 

FOMOGO

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#11
Nice little mill, and great job getting it cleaned up. What you call jeweling, I've always known as engine turning. A rose by any other name. Cheers, Mike
 

Red Baron FC

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Nice little mill, and great job getting it cleaned up. What you call jeweling, I've always known as engine turning. A rose by any other name. Cheers, Mike
English is not my mother tongue, so, excuse me if I use wrong words. I remember when I was try to found correct word to type it in google, to find how to do that. Good for language practising :) I found this type of work call swirl too. Whatsoever, I think it is nice way to mask dents and scratches. Another reason to do this is merely an exercise in this type of work.
 
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#13
Today was perfect day for little activity in workshop. I was scraped all paint and some putty from base using old chisel. I took me about six hours to complete the job. Great activity for stress relief :grin: plus exercise in sharpening chisel. Who could ask more from saturday. :rolleyes: The reason behind this work is many places where putty was pop up from cast iron, manifesting as little cracks in paint, looking just like when a small rock hit a glass on car. It can be seen on fifth picture. Those places where putty was pop up are white on pictures, there was left only a base paint on metal. Dark grey is where old putty is good enough to stay in place. Grey pile of something is what was scraped off. Weight about 1,5kg.

Now, in the next few days I will prepare the base for paint. I have no compressor nor ability to move the base somewhere to paint it, so I plan to paint it with brush. I see people paint restored machines with all sort of paint. My plan is to use enamel paint, but I will like to hear some advice on this. Is it a god choice or not. Do you suggest something else? The color will be pure white or RAL 7035 although RAL 7035 looking to me to dark either.
 

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middle.road

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#14
English is not my mother tongue, so, excuse me if I use wrong words. I remember when I was try to found correct word to type it in google, to find how to do that. Good for language practising :) I found this type of work call swirl too. Whatsoever, I think it is nice way to mask dents and scratches. Another reason to do this is merely an exercise in this type of work.
You're doing fine so far, no problem.
It is cool to see what other folks in other parts of the world have in their shops.
 
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