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COMachinist

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#1
Hi all
I think am outgoing my old threaded Clausing 111 Mk III. I want a lathe with the d1 mount system so I can do internal right and left threading with the chuck flying off. So looking at the Grizzly G4003G. The clausing is a good old lathe a can do some good work but it does have its limits for sure. The Grizzly has just about all i will ever need for the rest of my life, at 67 I should be selling off stuff instead of adding new machines. Compaired to the other 12x36 gunsmith lasthes how does it compare?
CH
 

markba633csi

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#2
Two things: lack of backgear and minimum speed of 70 rpm. Maybe not a problem for you ? Would be for me. Seems like backgears are disappearing from most modern lathes. I would want a variable speed motor if I had to give up the backgears.
Also, the D1-5 system is less popular than the D1-4 and more expensive -
Check out the Precision Mathews offerings
Mark
 
Last edited:

pdentrem

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#3
I would really look at PM 1236 or their 1440 units. Get it with a 3 phase motor and VFD and dial the rpm you want. Add in a collet chuck and QCTP set and call it done.
 

Cactus Farmer

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#4
the D1-5 is the odd duck for mounting things but I have one and have learned to live with it. D1-5 is the smallest mount with 6 mounting pins. D1-4 uses 3 pins. I just think 6 is better than 3! I've found several D1-5 mounts or mounted chucks and have a 5-C collet chuck too. I make a lot of small parts so the collets are used a lot.
 

Bob Korves

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#5
The D1-5 spindle is a waste on the G4003G. The lathe still has the 1.5" spindle hole, so there is no need for bigger chuck openings than what a D1-4 can accommodate. The 3 pins of the D1-4 are entirely adequate for strength and flex, all they do is hold the two faces together. The D1-5 tooling is quite a bit more expensive, and more rare to find used. To me the other "gunsmith" upgrades from the 4003 to the 4003g are (yawn) not worth the difference in cost. If I was looking for a new 12x36 lathe, I would talk to Matt at PM. If you really want a lathe with a D1-5 spindle, get one with the bigger spindle hole that it allows.
 

Mitch Alsup

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#6
Here is a series of videos of a woman making a single action army on a G4003G and a bridgeport.

I happen to have a G4003G, it's a fine lathe. The big difference between a G4003 and a G4003G (other than paint scheme) is the bearings in the spindle.

I bought mine last year at 64 years old (me not the lathe)
 

COMachinist

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#7
Hey Mitch
Thanks for that great link on the build of the sigle action Army. That lady is good. Looks like that G4003G works nice. How did you find the chucks and their run out? I hve a nice plain back collet chuck made in Poland that I can get D1-5 back plate for. So that would work out for a good selection of work holding. I have PM 932 mill so know about their great customer service, but by the time you buy all the stuff you get with the Griz you have as much or more in it and the lathe looks lighter than the Griz.
CH
 

Silverbullet

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#8
There are ways to lock your chucks to the threaded head. Several on YouTube to show how.
 

Mitch Alsup

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#9
Hey Mitch
Thanks for that great link on the build of the sigle action Army. That lady is good. Looks like that G4003G works nice. How did you find the chucks and their run out? I hve a nice plain back collet chuck made in Poland that I can get D1-5 back plate for. So that would work out for a good selection of work holding. I have PM 932 mill so know about their great customer service, but by the time you buy all the stuff you get with the Griz you have as much or more in it and the lathe looks lighter than the Griz.
CH
Thanks CH,

I find the 3-jaw in my (nearly new) G4003G has run-out in the 0.001-0.0015 range. (I have not pulled/reversed the jaws, yet)
Raw stock is often centered better than surface smoothness on the raw stock. (I was surprised, here.)
I did take the time to mark (punch) the chuck and spindle so that I can easily index the chuck back onto the same posts each time I put it back on. (But I don't know what kind of difference it makes, cause I didn't take any measurements.)

I find the 4-jaw easy to dial in to the point of surface roughness on the DTI.
I have not had the backplate on the lathe yet.
I can tell you, the lathe is one heavy <std curse word here> item.
The only issue I have ever had with the thing is that I had to debug the forward-off-reverse switch on the carriage.. The set screw was placed inappropriately for both switches to function. This was a 20 minute investigation and fix (took 3 tries).

I am happy with it, it is a far better tool than I am a machinist.
 

Splat

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#10
I love my G4003G. I found it locally used for a good price, otherwise I would've went with a PM1236. I think the PM1236 is a better deal all around, especially the support from Matt and the guys as PM. Highly recommended.
 

epanzella

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#11
I have my G4003G for four years now. I just love the machine. Coming off a back geared Logan, I first thought that a 70 rpm minimum speed was to fast but by the time I got good enough to build a speed reducer I got good enough to not need one.
 

jwmay

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#12
I have the g4002. Ive had it one year and some change, and I have not one complaint. One small thing: I wish it had a t slotted cross slide, and a smaller hole in the faceplate. Means nothing. Barring any catastrophic failures, I don’t think I’ll ever get a different lathe. I really can’t recommend it highly enough. I’m very happy with it. FWIW, I don’t really see anything special about the “gunsmith” upgrade. But I’m also not a gunsmith, so why would I? Ha!
 
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