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Metal shears & human flesh... (graphic)

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freeqgeek

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#1
Note to self... If it cuts metal it will also cut you...

Sharper than I thought they were. They cut thru that sheet metal like butter. Was expecting multiple cuts. Lesson learned. On the plus side, instead of stitches I had my first treatment with dermabond. :)

Thru the nail, glanced off the bone, out the tip. Bled for two hours before I gave up and visited the ER. Male stuborness....

accident.jpg
 

dlane

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#2
I keep dermabond in my first add kit , (sister is in health care) doesn’t work good on a joint that bends though .
 

Nogoingback

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#7
Glad to see you weren't hurt worse. I've always been super careful around my table saw, so the router table got me instead. Seems
like we need to learn these lessons the hard way.
 

freeqgeek

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#8
Glad to see you weren't hurt worse. I've always been super careful around my table saw, so the router table got me instead. Seems
like we need to learn these lessons the hard way.
Yep... Always the hard way... But I always say, it isn't officially a tool until it has some blood on it...lol

Like Woodchucker I am going to have a bump on the nail from the scar underneath. But otherwise it has healed nicely. Very lucky to still have my digit :)
 

Silverbullet

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#11
Eooouch but it smarted a bit. Glad your mending , I hate when stuff happens so quick. Usually I'm doing to much or tired or someone comes up and scares me into it. Keep it covered wear a finger cot or glove to help.
 

freeqgeek

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#12
Eooouch but it smarted a bit. Glad your mending , I hate when stuff happens so quick. Usually I'm doing to much or tired or someone comes up and scares me into it. Keep it covered wear a finger cot or glove to help.
Would love to wear gloves. But working with the lathe I am hesitant because of the danger. And I know me, going back and forth I would get lazy and just leave them on.

You know actually I didn't even feel it. On a scale of 10, it didn't even rate a one. Now, when the doctor sprayed wound cleaner in it, thats a different story. I actually cursed at the poor guy....lol. I honestly think he was a sadist :) It took him nearly five minutes to clean that wound and it wasn't even that big.
 

rwm

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#14
Dermabond sucks on fingers. Usually comes off and the wound opens. I found this out after I put my hand in my bandsaw. Don't ask...
Keep it covered and swing the hammer with the other hand! I'm glad you are OK!
Robert
 

brino

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#15
@freeqgeek, I'm glad it wasn't any worse.

It took him nearly five minutes to clean that wound and it wasn't even that big.
....but attention to that detail sure beats getting an infection in a deep wound!

Keep it covered and swing the hammer with the other hand!
Lol. In _MY_ other hand that would definitely result in more injuries!

-brino
 

Cooter Brown

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#16
I have fixed some very large cuts in my hands with superglue, and then got right back to work before the boss saw anything. I keep a toolbox drawer full of it at all times.
 

philip-of_Oregon

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#17
I will also say Ouch, That Hurt . . .

However, In my First Aid KITS (I have Four, located as needed) I keep an Herbal Remedy for ALL Cuts up to "Arterial Bleeders" IOW, if the blood is Spurting out, Go to Step TWO.

I am TRAINED as an EMT II as well as Several American Red Cross Advanced First Aid. That said, the Following ~Is Not~ found in those studies.

The Herb: "GoldenSeal" is an antiseptic as well as a Coagulater, in other words, a bit of this powder put Into your cut will STOP the blood flow, and then you can Slowly Clean away excess GS. At that point, the use of "Butterfly Bandages can pull a wound Closed, then cover with the usual Band-Aid. Of course, the usual issues, Cleaning of the wound channel is needed and Visual Inspection of the Wound Itself is needed, But I have carried this Herb for over 30 Years, and used it in the "OutBack" where there were no Doctors or ER rooms . . . You folks don't know me, so I suggest a quick Wiki Search on the stuff. DO NOT let its Price Scare you: Approx $115-120 a POUND, But even Giving it away as I do, In 30 years time I do not think I have bought more than Ahhh, Four Ounces! Literally an 1/8th Teaspoon is in my GS jar, and That is enough to cover an inch long (Minor) cut . . . The MOST I have ever used at One ~accident~ was almost a Half Teaspoon, maybe 50 cents worth of product! (that was on a Chef's Finger, he had no Insurance, and it was a To The Bone CUT. Completely healed in six Days!

Hope that helps.

philip
 

dewbane

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#18
My worst power tool oops came from the ubiquitous double wheel bench grinder. Everybody knows a bench grinder can get you in various ways. I was being careful how I used the wheel I was using, but I wasn't being careful at all around the wheel I wasn't using. It didn't take long to show me what the inside of a knuckle looks like.

My worst electrical oops came when I was showing my son how to use the electric hedge clippers. "Be careful not to cut the cord." I cut the cord. "You should really never do this, but I only have one long extension cord, so I'm going to solder it back together and keep using it for now." I turned off the power strip supplying the thing, cut the wires. "That was weird. It looked like a spark. The power is off. That couldn't have been a spark." So I proved it to my son by taking my knife and intentionally shorting the wires. The neutral was very much hot, and I stuck the knife into my shin bone. Do as I say, not as I do, son.

My worst really sharp thing oops came after I had just spent forever honing a chisel to a mirror-polished razor edge. I knocked it off the bench, and my beautiful edge was heading toward the unyielding floor. Without thinking, I caught it. Be careful what you wish for. THOCK! I stuck it into a finger bone.

My worst hand tool oops came when I was showing my son how to cut a square tenon to fit a mortise. I had a little piece of oak clamped short edge up in my face vise, and I started sawing one of the cheeks. The work slipped, and I guillotined the backsaw into my left index finger. It was one of those saws with the really aggressive bidirectional tooth pattern, and what seems like it should have just been a scratch severed the nerve in my finger. I had no feeling in that finger past the scar for several years. It was really, really ugly.

What did I use in all of the above situations where I did something incredibly stupid or careless and let copious amounts of the red goo out of my body? I walked to the bathroom calmly, smiling at my wife, and dumped alum all over it, then I went back to the shop to keep working. Alum is sold as a pickling spice, and that's why I have a little spice jar in my medicine cabinet. It also works great when you screw up and cut the dog's toenails too short.

Some people have nodded and congratulated my good thinking, while other people have reacted in horror to my use of alum. I am neither a doctor nor a nurse. I just tried an idea some old wife gave me, and I liked the results.

The best plan is to avoid letting the red goo out of yourself in the first place. I am a lot smarter than I was in my youth, though not smart enough to avoid cutting myself while installing and adjusting carbide endmills.
 

freeqgeek

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#19
My worst power tool oops came from the ubiquitous double wheel bench grinder. Everybody knows a bench grinder can get you in various ways. I was being careful how I used the wheel I was using, but I wasn't being careful at all around the wheel I wasn't using. It didn't take long to show me what the inside of a knuckle looks like.

My worst electrical oops came when I was showing my son how to use the electric hedge clippers. "Be careful not to cut the cord." I cut the cord. "You should really never do this, but I only have one long extension cord, so I'm going to solder it back together and keep using it for now." I turned off the power strip supplying the thing, cut the wires. "That was weird. It looked like a spark. The power is off. That couldn't have been a spark." So I proved it to my son by taking my knife and intentionally shorting the wires. The neutral was very much hot, and I stuck the knife into my shin bone. Do as I say, not as I do, son.

My worst really sharp thing oops came after I had just spent forever honing a chisel to a mirror-polished razor edge. I knocked it off the bench, and my beautiful edge was heading toward the unyielding floor. Without thinking, I caught it. Be careful what you wish for. THOCK! I stuck it into a finger bone.

My worst hand tool oops came when I was showing my son how to cut a square tenon to fit a mortise. I had a little piece of oak clamped short edge up in my face vise, and I started sawing one of the cheeks. The work slipped, and I guillotined the backsaw into my left index finger. It was one of those saws with the really aggressive bidirectional tooth pattern, and what seems like it should have just been a scratch severed the nerve in my finger. I had no feeling in that finger past the scar for several years. It was really, really ugly.

What did I use in all of the above situations where I did something incredibly stupid or careless and let copious amounts of the red goo out of my body? I walked to the bathroom calmly, smiling at my wife, and dumped alum all over it, then I went back to the shop to keep working. Alum is sold as a pickling spice, and that's why I have a little spice jar in my medicine cabinet. It also works great when you screw up and cut the dog's toenails too short.

Some people have nodded and congratulated my good thinking, while other people have reacted in horror to my use of alum. I am neither a doctor nor a nurse. I just tried an idea some old wife gave me, and I liked the results.

The best plan is to avoid letting the red goo out of yourself in the first place. I am a lot smarter than I was in my youth, though not smart enough to avoid cutting myself while installing and adjusting carbide endmills.
OUCH! On all counts... You and I appear to be long lost brothers... lol. I am forever finding ways to add new scars to my body. Glad you survived and hopefully those were all amazing examples to your children of how dangerous tools can really be. Maybe they will learn from your mistakes :) Us parents can hope right...?
 

philip-of_Oregon

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#20
OUCH! . . . . Us parents can hope right...?
I was in a "Family Therapy" with my younger Daughter, who Was finally GROWING Up . . . and had forgiven Dad, for what was ~her problem~ with me ( ! ! ! ! ! ) . . . . So, the therapist suggests @ talking "Good Things Dad Taught me" . . . . She PROUDLY SAYS: "He taught me that BECAUSE I am a Parent, I ~MUST HAVE~ a First Aid Kit, I have THREE" ( ! ! ! ) And she carries one in her Purse/backpack!
 
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