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Mikron F75

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oxocube

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I have recently purchased a Mikron F75 milling machine and I have started the process of stripping down and restoration, everything is going fine apart from removal of the spindle, I have loosened all bolts, screws and retaining rings but the thing will not come out or even move although it still has free movement to spin, any help on the process of removal would be greatly appreciated. The large rear pulley houses a 3-1 reduction gear engaged with a pin at the back and disengaging the center bolt on the middle pulley. Thanks Bill.
 

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Bob Korves

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Doesn't look like it needs much restoration to me. The paint appears to be original. I would leave the paint and the machine just the way it is, except for cleaning and servicing anything that needs it. Old machines only stay old until you "restore" them. Yours appears to be a very good candidate for "showing it's age." Think about it...
 

oxocube

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Hey Bob, Thanks for the input, The machine came from Mikron factory unpainted but treated to prevent rust, this was apparently to show of the very fine grey casting, I only know this after visiting Anglo-Swiss Machines web sight. The owner of the sight is very knowledgeable on all Swiss machines of this period but even he had no idea as to the removal of the spindle.
 

Bob Korves

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Still, and maybe I am preaching to the choir here, I would leave it in original condition in every way possible. Old machines, in original condition, well taken care of and preserved as they left the factory, are rare and are a direct view into the past. IMHO, new paint and modifications turn the machine into a "hot rod", which might please the current owner, but destroys the original history and ambience of the piece. Do as you wish, you are the current caretaker...

I do think old machines, except for those extremely old, of historical significance, and/or extremely rare and important, should be carefully used for what they were built to do. Otherwise, it is not a mill, it is a museum piece of art.
 
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