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Most acceptable way to lift lathe onto workbench

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oldschoolcane

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#1
Completed my workbench, now I need to get my 48" Atlas onto workbench safely. Not terribly heavy but I need to do this most likely by myself?
I've never used an engine hoist/lift before, is this the only option? Considered taking lathe apart, does the headstock come off easily? The motor and the assembly are already separate. Any thought or ideas?
Thanks.

Tim
 

Moderatemixed

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#2
The lathe comes apart very easily into 4 pieces, 1) Tailstock, 2) Headstock, 3) Saddle and 4) Bed. It comes apart in 30 min and is about an hour going back together. If you have an engine hoist, use it; it’ll be much easier.


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wa5cab

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#3
I would avoid disassembling the lathe that far unless you need to do it for some other reason. If you run the tailstock and carriage down to the right end of the bed, two normal adults can easily lift the unit.

If you have to do it by yourself, you should make a spreader bar from say a 4" by 1/2" flat bar or the equivalent in a "T" or two pieces of steel angle about 4 feet long. Rig up two choker straps or use one long one. Put the chokers around the headstock and the tailstock to keep the top-heavy lathe from turning over. Attach them to the ends of the spreader bar. With the carriage at the tailstock end of the bed, by test lifts, find the balance point for attaching the spreader to the hoist. If you need to move the lathe several feet, lift it enough to set it down on the hoist's legs until you have it in the final lifting position.
 

oldschoolcane

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#4
I had purchased the lathe a few years ago, its been stored in a crate since then and could use a good cleaning does the headstock come off fairly simply? I can see how the tailstock can be removed, maybe I should remove the headstock and tailstock clean and reassemble on the bench?
 

T Bredehoft

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#5
I'd shy away from removing the headstock. It's supp0osed to be exactly where it is. (unless it's been dropped). Putting it back there might be error prone.
 

wa5cab

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#6
The headstock is supposed to be a slight interference fit between the ways, and is positioned left to right by two tapped holes in the bottom of it that must line up with two drilled holes through the bed. Then it is locked in place by the 9-97 Clamp and a 1/2" bolt. Theoretically. you should be able to remove the 1/2" and two 5/16" bolts and remove and later reinstall the headstock without disturbing its accuracy. But as Tom wrote, I would avoid doing that if you can.
 

Bi11Hudson

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#7
I highly concur with previous comments about, basicly, leave the headstock alone. I mounted a Craftsman 12X36 with just a couple of motorcycle tie-down straps. Slow, but no sideways pressure where it shouldn't be. And then took the motor off. I had a stand welded up by a pro welder, I didn't trust my own work for something like this. Wanted it right. Again, leave the headstock be. With the motor off, it shouldn't be that heavy or imbalanced.
 

welderr

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#8
I wouldn't hesitate for a second to pull the headstock, it's simple enough to check if it's alligned later with a piece of drill rod in the chuck with a dial indicater on the carraige. Save your back your gonna need it. TJ
 

weewill

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#9
I used a hydraulic lift table from Harbor Freight to lift a mill drill. They mill weights over 500 lbs. With the lift table I raised it up and slid onto a stand by myself. Willy
 

Round in circles

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#10
I made a simple wooden gantry that was 7 feet above the floor using two new 2 x9 wooden joists 12 foot long set in the walls right across my small garage. To make an over croft above my lathe area. It came in handy to hang a small chain hoist off to lift my lathe off the trolley it was on .

The stand for the lathe is set on a welded frame set on 4 inch hard nylon locking castors, ( gives a good work height as I have a bust up spine and wrecked left leg ).
It was a simple task to use 2 x 2 ton webbing ratchet straps to fasten a length of 2x 3 wood along the bed of the lathe with the tail stock locked off at the right hand end and the carriage moved right up to it & locked off too.

With things set up like that the point of balance is slightly to the left of the center of the Atlas lathe. I hung a small plastic bucket next to a 1.5 ton chain hoist , used the bucket to contain the chain and winched the lathe up high enough to roll the stand under . . Kept the chain & straps on till I'd got the mounting bolts through all the mounting holes & fitted the washers & nylon locking nuts . Then fully lowered it to take the straps & wood off to tighten it up .
 

Moderatemixed

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#11
I have rebuilt 3 of these lathes and have dismantled 4 in total. The headstock is an interference fit as has been stated above. If you are concerned with accuracy being negatively affected, don’t be. Cleaning the lathe, bed, headstock, tail stock etc will likely improve it’s accuracy; unless of course you are un-crating a brand new Atlas (lol). Besides, understanding how your lathe goes together is never a bad idea; at least it shouldn’t be.


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coherent

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#12
For my first lathe I bought a cheap 1 ton chain hoist from harbor freight (about $40 on sale with a coupon). Hung it near the front of the garage door. Lifted the lathe with it and then lowered the lathe onto cart/table with wheels that was about the same height as my work bench. It was easy at that point to roll the table next to the work bench and slide it off onto it. Did it alone and it was pretty easy.
 

agfrvf

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#13
HF shop crane. I keep finding more uses for it.
 

C-Bag

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#14
HF shop crane. I keep finding more uses for it.
I concur. I have one of the folding models and it's not like I use it everyday. But working by yourself safely it's the only way to fly IMHO. I also broke down and got the 1,000lb lift cart and one ton chain hoist. Worth every penny and my back thanks me.
 
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