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Moving a Myford Lathe

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Ernienoatrainz

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I am moving my shop from a garage set up to a basement set up in a new house. I want to know how difficult it will be to remove the motor on a Myford super 7 long bed lathe. Also, I would like to slide the compete carriage off the bed. Would there be any difficulty in sliding it back on? I have the compete manual but it only shows all the parts in the exploded view. I want to lighten the load and reduce the possibility of damage to the carriage.
 

Aaron_W

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I have no familiarity with Myford lathes but looking at photos I see nothing unusual about their construction.

That shouldn't be an issue. I moved a 10" Logan into my basement and essentially did what you want to do. Removed the tailstock, ran the carriage off the end, and removed the spindle / gears from the headstock which allowed me to separate the lathe from the base and motor.

On the carriage I simply had to run it to the end of the lead screw, then unbolted the bearing at the tail end of the lead screw, gave the crank a couple more turns to separate the carriage from the screw threads then slid the carriage off the end of the bed. Reassembly is just in reverse, slide the carriage on until it contacts with the lead screw thread, then give the cranks a few turns while applying gentle pressure to the carriage until it re-engages the thread.
It was actually a very simple process, and the carriage is deceptively heavy so that is a good weight savings measure. Just be careful lifting the carriage off because it probably weighs more than you think it does.

Make sure you support the lead screw so you don't put pressure on the connection at the gearbox. Once the carriage is off, reattach the bearing so the lead screw is secure. A second set of hands can be helpful, but a small bungee cord or some strong string will do if you are doing it alone.
 

Ernienoatrainz

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Thanks all. It is reassuring to have advice on the move. All very good ideas that I will incorporate. My move is not for another 3 months, so I have plenty of time to prepare. I’ll also have access to the new house before the flooring goes in keeping damage to the house low.
 

Aaron_W

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Mr Pete / Tubalcain has a good video on disassembling a Logan lathe for moving it into his basement. I found it helpful even though it was a different model than mine. It seems small lathes have much in common as far as construction goes. He went much further than I did with the disassembly even separating the head from the bed. If nothing else it should inspire more confidence when moving yours.

 

markba633csi

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Keep track of how it comes apart in case some time elapses before reassembly, your memory can play tricks on you
Put bolts and fasteners back in their positions or label with tape. Take pictures if necessary
Mark
ps same goes for wiring
 

redgrouse

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I am moving my shop from a garage set up to a basement set up in a new house. I want to know how difficult it will be to remove the motor on a Myford super 7 long bed lathe. Also, I would like to slide the compete carriage off the bed. Would there be any difficulty in sliding it back on? I have the compete manual but it only shows all the parts in the exploded view. I want to lighten the load and reduce the possibility of damage to the carriage.
Hi hope i am not too late and you have made the move ? Anyway I have over the years moved several Myford's. Removing the carriage is a major strip down and I would not recommend it for moving the lathe - if you want instructions let me know!
To lower the weight you can easily remove the tail stock and the compound slide/tool holder plus of course the chuck & motor, however I have never removed the motor when moving a machine.
Assuming you can supply sufficient muscle power - 3-man lift -- the machines are not overly heavy just awkward and unbalanced . What I have always done is make a "handle" to lift the headstock end of the machine, do this by using a suitable piece of timber, say 3" x 2" and about 3ft long, drill a 1/2" hole for a bolt, make a steel plate that fits under the bed ways with a 1/2" hole then with the carriage at the rear bolt the handle onto the bed just in front of the spindle -- thus 2 men at the front and one at the rear can lift the machine with ease and safety.
Hope this helps J
 

Ernienoatrainz

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Thanks for the advice. I found very quickly the compound was not going to come off easily. There are two locating pins that were never going to come out. I did get the motor off and did a thorough cleaning of that area. I have the lathe set up with two long 2 x 4's as handles spaced 2 feet apart. I think two men should be able to move it just fine. The ENCO mill is more of a worry. but I have that in three pieces. and the movers looked like that was OK when they came to look over all that was being moved.
 

MozamPete

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I made up a couple of pieces of 2 x 4 with feet to bolt my Myford lathe too with some all thread and nuts and have used them several times. Makes rigging and manually carrying it easy. Two people can lift it but I normally try to use three to make it easy - two at the headstock end, one on the tailstock end - and it can be moved fully assembled.

295657
 

Flyinfool

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If all those boards are bolted securely I would just stand it up on a furniture dolly or hand cart, with the wood against the dolly, and let the dolly do the work. I moved a Tree 2UVR mill, 3400 Lbs, and a Jet GH1340 lathe, 1100 Lbs and a Brown & Sharp #2 surface grinder, 1480 Lbs, into my basement. These moves required me to move down a hallway and down the basement steps with two 90° turns tossed in for good measure. Unfortunately this was in the days before digital cameras so I have no pics or videos of the moves.
The lathe was moved with no disassembly needed at all. The mill and the grinder were disassembled for the moves. The heavy bases were bolted to a base with 4 swivel casters. The rest of the parts all came down the steps on my hand cart. For the heavy parts I built a ramp down the steps to roll it down using my P/U truck as an anchor.
When I was doing this I could not find a moving company that would touch "machinery" and I could not find a machine mover that would enter a home setting.

If you would like to talk about these moves I can be available. To bad you are not just a bit closer, I would come down to help out. Moving machines is fun. Half the fun is the figuring out how to do it SAFELY.
 

redgrouse

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Excellent solution considerably more complicated than I used but better ! A very nice machine late vintage and a long bed with power cross feed, I have the same but mine is one of the last grey ones c1977 or 78.
The 2 pins you refer too that cannot be removed - are they in the RHS leadscrew bearing bracket ? If so they should be tapped so they can be withdrawn with a simple puller.
 

Winegrower

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I am so thankful that I have never had to move a mill or lathe into or out of a basement. I believe I would offer it as a bonus to the new owner.
 

Ernienoatrainz

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Excellent solution considerably more complicated than I used but better ! A very nice machine late vintage and a long bed with power cross feed, I have the same but mine is one of the last grey ones c1977 or 78.
The 2 pins you refer too that cannot be removed - are they in the RHS leadscrew bearing bracket ? If so they should be tapped so they can be withdrawn with a simple puller.
Yes, it is the Leadscrew bearing bracket and they are taped. The way you describe the removal is the way I think they come out. Do you know what thread and size they are? For my move, I am going to leave them as is. But it would be nice to know what size for future maintenance,
 

Ernienoatrainz

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If all those boards are bolted securely I would just stand it up on a furniture dolly or hand cart, with the wood against the dolly, and let the dolly do the work. I moved a Tree 2UVR mill, 3400 Lbs, and a Jet GH1340 lathe, 1100 Lbs and a Brown & Sharp #2 surface grinder, 1480 Lbs, into my basement. These moves required me to move down a hallway and down the basement steps with two 90° turns tossed in for good measure. Unfortunately this was in the days before digital cameras so I have no pics or videos of the moves.
The lathe was moved with no disassembly needed at all. The mill and the grinder were disassembled for the moves. The heavy bases were bolted to a base with 4 swivel casters. The rest of the parts all came down the steps on my hand cart. For the heavy parts I built a ramp down the steps to roll it down using my P/U truck as an anchor.
When I was doing this I could not find a moving company that would touch "machinery" and I could not find a machine mover that would enter a home setting.

If you would like to talk about these moves I can be available. To bad you are not just a bit closer, I would come down to help out. Moving machines is fun. Half the fun is the figuring out how to do it SAFELY.
Thanks for the info. All my Mill parts are bolted to plywood bases to make them a little more stable. The idea of using a hand cart for the move downstairs should be the way I will go with the movers.
 

redgrouse

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Hi yes the dowels are tapped 4BA thread that's 0.1417" dia x 38.46 tpi a real odd ball ! Used by instrument & clock makers probably difficult to find in the US ? you need something about 1.5" long with a nut and a tube around 1 inch long with a bore to clear 1/4"
If you are stuck and cannot find 4BA threaded rod message me and I'll pop a bit in the post for you -- gratis !
Might be worth checking your machine its just possible they MAY have changed to metric ?????
If you search Myford UK look on the new owners web site at the bottom you can access serial numbers and it will tell you when yours was made.
John
 

Ernienoatrainz

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Hi yes the dowels are tapped 4BA thread that's 0.1417" dia x 38.46 tpi a real odd ball ! Used by instrument & clock makers probably difficult to find in the US ? you need something about 1.5" long with a nut and a tube around 1 inch long with a bore to clear 1/4"
If you are stuck and cannot find 4BA threaded rod message me and I'll pop a bit in the post for you -- gratis !
Might be worth checking your machine its just possible they MAY have changed to metric ?????
If you search Myford UK look on the new owners web site at the bottom you can access serial numbers and it will tell you when yours was made.
John
Thanks for the info. I have been doing Model RR and have a few British engines from Roundhouse. They all use BA threads, so I have access to BA stuff. I am going to save your post in my Myford file. I would mark up the manual but it is long gone in a box for the move. My Lathe does have a combination of BA and Metric threads. It took me a while to find out the thread for the back of the bed to attach the taper attachment. It is nice to know there are others with this machine and can provide support.
 

redgrouse

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Glad you are all sorted, here is a link to the UK ME site with a further link to a S7 Manual in PDF format -- older then your machine but only a few changes e.g. addition of the dowels re this post. If you search the forum for Myford there is a heap of info, in particular there is a simplified method of screw cutting metric pitches which are very very close to perfect and much simpler than setting up the whole gear train

Link to a site with info on the manual
 
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