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Moving an ENCO mill/Drill

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Ernienoatrainz

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I will be moving my ENCO table top Mill/Drill from a garage set up to a basement set up in a new house. I am planning to remove the 4 bolts that hold the column and head to remove the whole top of the machine. In addition, I’ll be taking the motor off also. I’ll be using a shop crane for the removal and replacement. Does anyone know if I’ll be creating a problem doing this? I know it will need to be set up and re tramed in the new location. I am trying to lighten the load for the move by having three pieces to move. I plan to have another person to help.
 

mikey

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No, you won't create any problems. To get things as light as possible, remove the motor, then remove the cap on top of the column. Then remove the head; crank it to the top of the rack and you can then lift it off the top of the column. Then remove the 4 column bolts and the column comes off. You can go further and remove the table if you need to get it lighter.
 

Aaron_W

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As with the lathe, I'm not familiar with the specifics of the Enco mill, but most can be fairly easily broken into smaller parts for moving.

I recently moved a small Clausing mill into my basement and we broke it down into about 6 major components (base, column, table, head, motor, and power feed). Just make sure you keep the parts labelled and together for anything that isn't obvious how it goes together. It is very easy to get distracted when moving and what seemed easy to take apart can be harder to put back together when 3 weeks have gone by and you are trying to remember what goes where.

If you are talking about something like an RF-31, I'd think you could easily remove the head and table making 3 much easier to move loads.
 

MontanaLon

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The head is the heaviest piece but the base, table and column aren't exactly light. It depends on how much you want to struggle with it. If it were me, I would take off the motor, pull the head, remove the column and table from base. The column and head together are about 300 pounds, the base and table together also about 300. If you take it down one more step the heaviest part will be around 200 and way easier to get ahold of. You can put a 2x4 through the column channel through the head to give yourself handles as it is awkward to hold onto otherwise.

If your basement steps are like mine, 2 feet wide and steep planning ahead is key.
 

Ernienoatrainz

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Thanks all. It is reassuring to have advice on the move. All very good ideas that I will incorporate. My move is not for another 3 months, so I have plenty of time to prepare. I’ll also have access to the new house before the flooring goes in keeping damage to the house low.
 

craptain

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That's exactly the way I moved mine. Have some shim stock on hand for reassembly and tramming.

Sent from my SM-G930T using Tapatalk
 

MikeInOr

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By disassembling the mill/drill into a few smaller pieces you are going to eliminate the possibility of something being tweaked because the heavy mill/drill head is bouncing around unsupported while being moved.

When I move something like this (in particular radial arm saws) I lower the head onto a piece of wood so it is resting on the table instead of having all the strain on the column. In my opinion disassembly is better than just supporting the head.
 

stioc

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Granted I didn't have a basement to deal with and had plenty of room to move around here's how I did it. It looks a bit sketchy lifting the entire weight from the head but it felt fine. Later on I found out that it's what the Grizzly's manual suggests too, which at the time I didn't know about and I knew nothing about mills so I wasn't going to start taking it apart, sometimes ignorance is bliss! lol





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kvt

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Take it to as small a pieces as you can to move it down to the basement. Then you can clean it while you are at it.
When putting it back together the main thing will be getting it back in TRAM. I took my new to me one apart after getting it home, cleaned everything then put back together and did all the alignments etc. Was not that big of a deal with the engine hoist to get the head off then take the col off. Taking the table off will also reduce weight for getting it down to the basement.
 

lafester

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Is there a trick to removing the table? I took out the gibb and lead screw, I believe it is supposed to lift out at this point?
No matter where or at what angle it always hits the dovetail.

I have to remove my new rf30 from a basement to bring it home and the seller never used it as it was his grandfathers.
We are fumbling around trying to figure out the best way to get it out of there. Grandpa must have paid someone to get it down there in '98.

I am bringing over my engine hoist so we can get the mill off the stand and then get the head off. I think we'll just strap the head (and then base) to an appliance dolly to move it up stairs. Hesitating to remove the motor but might do it if needed.
 

mikey

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Remove the screws that hold the leadscrew brackets to the table on either end and allow the brackets to rotate down and out of the way. Then remove the gib and gib adjustment screw. This allows the table to move independent of the leadscrew. Then just slide the table to the left until it clears the dovetails and can be lifted off.
 

lafester

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Will give that a shot, thanks!


Remove the screws that hold the leadscrew brackets to the table on either end and allow the brackets to rotate down and out of the way. Then remove the gib and gib adjustment screw. This allows the table to move independent of the leadscrew. Then just slide the table to the left until it clears the dovetails and can be lifted off.
 

lafester

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So the engine hoist worked great for breaking down the mill. It was just too tall on the stand to get the head off safely. We carried up the head/motor, base/column, table and stand. The weight isn't really the problem, just awkward and slippery to keep a grip. Now I just have to get it out of the Xterra.

Did the op successfully move his machine?
 

WCraig

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Will the assembled machine (off the base) fit in a typical cargo van? I too have just purchased a mill/drill (Craftex B1977) via an auction. I have to pick it up on Saturday and the forecast is for rain. I need to rent a vehicle to bring it home (about 1.5 hour drive) and so I want to use a van to keep it dry. Just want to be sure that it will go into the van while dangling from an engine hoist (ala @stioc ). The manual says the overall height is 43.5 inches. There were about 300 lots in the auction so pickup on Saturday is likely to be a zoo. I won't have time to disassemble the machine much more than lifting it off the stand.

After I get it back to my garage, I'll take my time getting it ready to move to my basement shop.

BTW, thanks to everybody that contributed to this thread. Tonnes of good information!

Craig
 

mickri

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One thing that I did when I got my mill/drill was to make a mark on the column before removing the column so I could put it back in the same position. The shims all when back in the same places and the mill was trammed without needing any adjustment. I broke mine down to 4 pieces. Motor, head/column, base and stand. Loaded them into my truck in that order so when I got home the stand came out first, then the base, next the head/column and finally the motor.
 

Flyinfool

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You will have to take it off of the stand, but it should fit in almost any van. You will have to have the rigging kept short so that the boom will not be to far above the mill so that it will fit thru the door.
Even if it will fit in the van while still on the stand, It will be very top heavy and want to tip while driving. Even the mill off the stand will still be top heavy and tippy. Lower the head as far as it will go to help lower the Center of Gravity. Put it as far forward as your hoist will get it. Bring a bunch of ratchet straps to tie it down good.

Since it is about 270 kg (600 lbs) and you will most likely have it at the very back of the cargo area that is hard on the vehicle and will make the front end lighter on the wheels, so be careful driving on wet slippery roads.

And don't forget pictures........
 

WCraig

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@Flyinfool Thanks for the good suggestions. As luck would have it, the rental place only had cube vans and I'm getting that for the same price as the cargo van. I'm still planning to take the machine off the stand--not sure the engine hoist would be able to lift it high enough to get it into the van otherwise. And I hear you about tie-down straps. I think I've got enough but I'm going to check.

Gotta say this whole one-shot-at-a-short-pickup window is kinda stressful. Moving machinery isn't my normal gig and it won't be fun if I don't have all the right stuff when I need it.

Craig
 

stioc

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Agree with @Flyinfool - engine hoist will not be able to lift it into a truck/van with the stand; it may onto a trailer. Also the stand that mine came with is just sheet metal and for a drive it'll be very top heavy. So you will want to take it off the stand and lower the head as far as it'll go. Make sure the head clamping bolts are tight!

Where I picked mine up, the owner had one of those hydraulic carts, we unbolted the mill from the base (4 nuts/screws), lifted it on to the hydraulic cart table, then rolled it out to the truck and slid it into the bed. I positioned it up against the truck's cab and held it down with two 1000lbs ratchet straps around the column.

When lifting/moving heavy things I always assume it's going to fall so I keep myself and others well clear of it in case it does. Bring a buddy if you can, you should be good.
 

Illinoyance

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When I had to move a mill drill I drilled a 3/4" hole through the bottom of the sheet metal belt guard. I used a threaded rod with an eye nut on top and a plate and nut at the bottom. The plate spanned the opening in the casting. It was an easy pick with an engine hoist.
 

epanzella

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I assumed that the factory must have a simple way of moving these machines so I poked around the top of the column with a screwdriver. Just as I suspected, there were 2 threaded holes in the top of the column that were just about invisable because they were plugged with grease. I torched a hole in a piece of angle and bolted it on the top of the column using those 2 holes and the 2 bolts holding on the idler pulley. After that picking it up with the shop crane was cake.
 

Ernienoatrainz

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It has been two weeks since the move. The mill was split into the three parts (motor, Head/column and table. The movers tried to carried it and found it to be too heavy so they refused to put it in the basement I tried to explain that they needed to strap it to a dolly. Two days later I found two men willing to finish my move. They put all the pieces on a dolly and wheeled it down the staircase to the basement. On problem! They also did the same with the lathe which is lighter than the mill parts. So much when wrong with the move that it will be a while before I can set up the machines. I did get the lights up and the extra outlets for the shop. Now it is on to creating the storage shelving and a base for the lathe.
 

WCraig

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I got my mill/drill home from the auction yesterday. Sorry, no pictures--no time to peel off the gloves and fiddle with the phone.

Short story: powered lift gates are AWESOME. The rental place offered me a cube van with power lift gate for no up-charge when I went to pick up the truck. At the auction, a couple of us slid the mill/drill over the concrete floor to the edge of the garage. Then backed the truck up and got the lift gate at the same height as the stand. Unbolted the machine from the stand and slid it onto the lift gate. Lifted the rest of the way and slid the machine into the truck. Easy-peasy!

At home, I basically reversed the procedure to slide the machine back off the truck and onto the stand in my garage.

I had rented a engine hoist but never actually used it. Never even assembled it.

Anyway, now to go over what I got. There is a single collet locked in the spindle but I do not seem to have a collet wrench. There is no cutter in the collet, however. Gonna have to find a wrench before I can do much of anything.

Related, I downloaded the manual for my machine. There is no information on lubrication that I can find. Is there some kind of chart of the lubrication points and recommended lubricants?

Craig
 

rock_breaker

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Had to put my machines through the front door of the old house that has become my shop. I used 3 2X 8 planks side by side with a lot of blocking under the planks to keep them level and support the weight. Using several short lengths of 1" pipe I rolled them inside to their working spots. A 3510 Branson tractor isn't the best tool to lift them either but it can be done 1 end at a time. Experienced hands at cribbing will tell you to keep it level and stable. As has been said before, work outside the fall zone. More blocking is better than just barely enough! Don't ask me how I know.
Have a good day
Ray
 
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