[4]

Moving to a rental soon

[3]
[10] Like what you see?
Click here to donate to this forum and upgrade your account!

JStarks

Newbie
Registered
Joined
Aug 20, 2018
Messages
13
Likes
4
#1
So the wife had to take a job out of state, we rented a place this week, she has to be moved by December, I am finishing my contract and wont move till July of 2019. The garage at the rental is plenty big enough to accomadate evergthing, but the floor has a 6 defree slope. Since its a rental I won’t be abpe to alter anything permanently. I need to level my motorcycle lift, 2 rolling work benches that hold my mini lathe, grinder, machinist tool box stock under 48 inches and my G0463 bench top mill. As well as a 3 box tool chest and 50 gallon compresser. Has anyone had to deal with that here and what was the solution? I can’t drive anchors or cut and pour pier footings. I feel my only solution is going to be a terraced board walk around the perimeter. Ive owned a home for sonlong now that renting is going to blow.
 

Cadillac

Active Member
Registered
Joined
Mar 12, 2018
Messages
448
Likes
479
#2
Just about everything I own in the garage has adjustable casters. Great for moving to clean behind or underneath. The only pieces that aren’t on wheels but leveling feet is my Bridgeport, lathes, and surface grinder.
Another advantage is your stuff will be on wheels to help with moving. Win win!
 

kvt

Active User
H-M Supporter - Gold Member ($25)
Joined
Oct 21, 2014
Messages
2,008
Likes
997
#3
My garage shop is on a grade as well. Lathes and stuff are on levelers, and the rest is on locking casters. Shop bench is just on the slope as well. as my garage is a bit small, I actually have a lot of my stuff lined up in one corner and have to move stuff around to get to what I need from band saws to grinders etc. Thus the wheels are great role them out setup do the work and put them back.
 

tjb

Terry
H-M Platinum Supporter ($50)
Joined
May 3, 2017
Messages
362
Likes
221
#4
Sounds like most of your machining equipment is of the bench top variety. That being the case and if your rolling work benches are sturdy enough, it may make sense to stabilize the benches and level the machines on top of them. Of course, that only makes sense if the benches will be relatively stationary. Otherwise, you'll be re-leveling every time you move the benches. Even that may not be the end of the world, however. I built two very heavy duty rolling work benches that had bench top lathes on them that would be moved from time to time. Admittedly, I wasn't dealing with a 6 degree slope, but only rarely are floors 'totally' level, and I had no problems with the machines being true.

Also, it seems to me that a greater challenge would be 'smoothness' as opposed to 'slope'. Again, if your benches are relatively stationary, a 'smooth slope' may not pose that significant of a problem.

Regards,
Terry
 

tq60

Brass
Registered
Joined
Jan 11, 2014
Messages
660
Likes
390
#5
Simple shims...

Place bench then Jack up and place plywood under short legs...done.

Sent from my SAMSUNG-SM-G930A using Tapatalk
 

JStarks

Newbie
Registered
Joined
Aug 20, 2018
Messages
13
Likes
4
#6
Ehhh 6 degrees is a lot of leveling for the feet on my mill, plus the rolliing benches are mobile work station cabinets, i somehow doubt drawers and doors are going to be happy on that kind of grade. Im working on a couple of ideas now.
 

8mpg

Active Member
Registered
Joined
Sep 8, 2018
Messages
67
Likes
66
#7
I would only level the stuff that really needs it. The tool boxes, air compressor, tables dont have to be level.
 

JStarks

Newbie
Registered
Joined
Aug 20, 2018
Messages
13
Likes
4
#8
I would only level the stuff that really needs it. The tool boxes, air compressor, tables dont have to be level.

OCD... I’m also ADHD and have a few other mental health issues. My stuff has to be level. My wife does not fold or put my laundry away. I have a very specific fold pattern and order they belong in when they go into the drawer.
 

JStarks

Newbie
Registered
Joined
Aug 20, 2018
Messages
13
Likes
4
#9
Sounds like most of your machining equipment is of the bench top variety. That being the case and if your rolling work benches are sturdy enough, it may make sense to stabilize the benches and level the machines on top of them. Of course, that only makes sense if the benches will be relatively stationary. Otherwise, you'll be re-leveling every time you move the benches. Even that may not be the end of the world, however. I built two very heavy duty rolling work benches that had bench top lathes on them that would be moved from time to time. Admittedly, I wasn't dealing with a 6 degree slope, but only rarely are floors 'totally' level, and I had no problems with the machines being true.

Also, it seems to me that a greater challenge would be 'smoothness' as opposed to 'slope'. Again, if your benches are relatively stationary, a 'smooth slope' may not pose that significant of a problem.

Regards,
Terry
Once they go into place they are stationary.

The bike lift is the biggie though. The scissor action has one set of legs rolling fore and aft. Dont want a 965lb touring bike 4 feet in the air if it aint stable.
 

Downunder Bob

H-M Supporter - Sustaining Member
Staff member
H-M Platinum Supporter ($50)
Joined
May 16, 2016
Messages
1,016
Likes
410
#10
Would it be out of the question to level the floor, if the landlord is ok just concrete it up and float it off. otherwise build a false floor out of timber and get it level. How long are you going to be there?
 

tjb

Terry
H-M Platinum Supporter ($50)
Joined
May 3, 2017
Messages
362
Likes
221
#11
OCD... I’m also ADHD and have a few other mental health issues. My stuff has to be level. My wife does not fold or put my laundry away. I have a very specific fold pattern and order they belong in when they go into the drawer.
Um, are we related? Didn't know I had any relatives in OK. No time to chat. Gotta go sort my sock drawer.
 

tjb

Terry
H-M Platinum Supporter ($50)
Joined
May 3, 2017
Messages
362
Likes
221
#12
The bike lift is the biggie though. The scissor action has one set of legs rolling fore and aft. Dont want a 965lb touring bike 4 feet in the air if it aint stable.
That part of your shop is an entirely different matter. I have a lift in my shop and was concerned about stability (OCD overkill, I know). The base plate was half-inch steel, so I butt-jointed and welded larger pieces of half-inch plate to increase the footprint and bolt pattern. In retrospect, that almost certainly wasn't necessary, but I never worry about getting under a car/truck/tractor/piece of equipment.

Again, in my case, 'leveling' wasn't an issue. I wonder if you could mill some plate steel at an angle to fit under your lift's base plates that would orient it at vertical to the floor? Perhaps you could then weld them to larger pieces of plate like I did to increase the footprint; maybe add some gussets or bracing to the uprights; and weld bolts to match the stud pattern on your lift? That might help with the restriction on no driven floor anchors. Probably not on the radar screen, but an added advantage may be that the lift also becomes mobile.

I have no idea of the dimensions of your lift, but probably the safest option would be to get a full-size sheet of 1/2" or thicker plate steel, weld some studs to it, and mount the lift onto that one solid piece. My local source for steel told me some time back that cold rolled weighs 40.8 lbs. per 1"x12"x12". According to that formula 1/2" thick 4x8 weighs 652.8 lbs. My main (stationary) work bench has a top made of that with legs and bracing made of 4x4 square tubing with 1/4" wall, plus a 1/8" thick shelf. I did the math some time back, and the whole contraption weighs around 900 lbs. I wouldn't hesitate one bit to mount a lift onto it and put a motorcycle on it.

The biggest challenge for you would be getting it into the garage. (I had to weld homemade casters onto mine in order to move it to another part of my shop, then cut the casters off of it. It's mighty sturdy.) But the way I'm visualizing it, you could actually do the build on site. If that's not big enough, it's my understanding that you can get cold rolled in 5' x 10' sheets. That would weigh in at over 1,000 lbs.

Cold rolled isn't cheap these days, but if you buy it, you own it. If a move into your own home is in your future, you can always re-purpose the steel.

Good luck.

Regards,
Terry
 

JStarks

Newbie
Registered
Joined
Aug 20, 2018
Messages
13
Likes
4
#13
Would it be out of the question to level the floor, if the landlord is ok just concrete it up and float it off. otherwise build a false floor out of timber and get it level. How long are you going to be there?
Out of the question


At least one year. In reality will only be there about 4 months before the first year lease is up I really wanted to find a place just over the border in Wisconsin but she did not feel comfortable dealing with winter and commuting by herself. Maybe next year we’ll get over the border moving to Illinois is going to cause me some serious issues with parts of my firearms colkection.
 

Cadillac

Active Member
Registered
Joined
Mar 12, 2018
Messages
448
Likes
479
#14
Out of the question


At least one year. In reality will only be there about 4 months before the first year lease is up I really wanted to find a place just over the border in Wisconsin but she did not feel comfortable dealing with winter and commuting by herself. Maybe next year we’ll get over the border moving to Illinois is going to cause me some serious issues with parts of my firearms colkection.
Illinois really doesn't have any better of a winter than Wisconsin. They SUCK!!! And so do the roads. Unless you go south at least Champaine /Urbana. Guns yeah full autos that's a no no. Unless you buy off the street than just go to the east side they'll have whatever you want. :confusion:
 

GoceKU

Brass
Registered
Joined
Jul 14, 2017
Messages
640
Likes
1,211
#15
I've had to deal with something similar, and i went with at simplest and cheapest way, i bought solid concrete blocks used in gardens to level my benches and wedged all my equipment one to another so they can't roll away i try using wood on some parts of the slope but it rotted away in few months so i'll won't recommend using wood.
 

JStarks

Newbie
Registered
Joined
Aug 20, 2018
Messages
13
Likes
4
#16
Illinois really doesn't have any better of a winter than Wisconsin. They SUCK!!! And so do the roads. Unless you go south at least Champaine /Urbana. Guns yeah full autos that's a no no. Unless you buy off the street than just go to the east side they'll have whatever you want. :confusion:
Sbr’s and suppressors. I don’t have the cash to afford anything I want with a giggle switch
For now I’m adding someone to my trust who can keep them in OK. The roads in lake county IL are way better than Oklahoma.
 

JStarks

Newbie
Registered
Joined
Aug 20, 2018
Messages
13
Likes
4
#17
I've had to deal with something similar, and i went with at simplest and cheapest way, i bought solid concrete blocks used in gardens to level my benches and wedged all my equipment one to another so they can't roll away i try using wood on some parts of the slope but it rotted away in few months so i'll won't recommend using wood.
Thanks, thats what i was looking for.
 
[6]
[5] [7]
Top