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Chris_V

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I have always wanted a lathe and came across this beat up 3 in 1 at an estate sale a few months back. Last weekend I decided to clean it up and it appears to work well. I know nothing about machining but look forward to learning. I did chuck up a pvc coupling and bored out the ID just to say I turned something. :)

Anyway can anyone help identify any of the tooling that came with the lathe?

Thanks
 

Ulma Doctor

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here is the tooling from left to right-
boring bar, MT adapter sleeve, Mt Dead Center , Mt Dead Center, Carbide Insert , HSS form tool, 60° straight carbide holder, (destroyed) brazed carbide bits
 

Chris_V

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Thanks for the information. Now I just have to look up those tools to see what they are used for. The dead centers fit the tail stock.
 

Ulma Doctor

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the boring bar is generally used to make internal cuts, but i have used them for external cuts
BTW, dead centers can be used in both the tailstock and in the spindle, for turning between centers
the MT adapter sleeve has a Morse taper on both the internal and external surfaces, it is meant to adapt smaller Morse taper tools to larger Morse taper sockets
you don't appear to have a holder for the triangular carbide insert
you'll need to measure the tool holder that has the 60° straight insert- it may be a CCMT

the AMMCO inserts are intended for brake resurfacing lathes, turning cast iron drums or discs
you may be able to create a tool that holds them in the correct geometry, but
IMO you may be better off purchasing used or import tooling

it would also be to your advantage to learn how to grind HSS (high speed steel) bits by hand
HSS will cut just about anything a hobbyist will trow at it (less exotic materials)
HSS with 8% Cobalt will take care of the rest of what you are likely to run against

If you combine that with an expert's advise (@mikey) , read this post in entirety .....

his shear tool is beyond reproach.
i have used it on the lathe and shaper and the geometry is incredible on multiple materials from stainless to aluminum,& nylon to delrin

i would avoid buying the tools on the top right of the first picture for now- save that for later

you may wish to consider spending a few shekels on a AXA quick change tool post to improve the lathe function,
that is if you intend to turn materials.

i can say from experience that the 3in1's are nice machines, but they lack rigidity.
as a result, your milling cuts will need to be oriented in the conventional milling direction.
the work is fed into the rotating tool in the opposite direction of feed
in your case, the tool may spin clockwise.
that's great if you are drilling holes,
but if you feed work from the table into the cutter, you are climb milling - no bueno :(
climb milling has its place, but not in deep cuts on light machines
it sucks tools out of drill chucks, it breaks all but the sturdiest of tooling ( don't ask how i know this crap )
the moral of the story, run the drill chuck counter clockwise if you are going to attempt successful milling (over .010" depth)
run the drill chuck clockwise for only very light finish cuts (less than .005"depth)

as far as the lathe function,
you'll need to grind or shim the bits to match the spindle center height, this is critical to proper operation
if the tool sits too low it digs into the work and creates havoc
if the tool sits too high, the bottom of the tool rubs on the work and doesn't present the intended cutting edge to the work.
ideally, the work centerline and the tool's top cutting edge should be on the same plane
again, i'll stress the need for grinding tooling, it will be very important for your success here.


other than that, you'll have hours of fun learning how it all works,
theres lots help if you ask!
all the best
mike
 
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mikey

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Thank you for the kind words, Mike! I really enjoyed collaborating with you on those tools and am even happier that they worked for you. As always, I am here if you need me.
 

ttabbal

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Yes, definitely read and use what I call "the book of mikey". It's great stuff. Ask in the thread and we can get you a set of model tools when you're ready. If they aren't still floating around I'll make some, and I'm sure a few others here would be happy to as well. That machine is a great deal for the price. I'm sure you can make some great stuff with it.
 

mikey

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Thanks, Travis. Chris, contact @Z2V to see if any model tool sets are available if you're interested.
 
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Chris_V

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Mikey thanks for the tool post. That is a ton of reading / research. I think it may be a bit befotim ready to grind my own tools but I'll keep it in mind.

BTW I used to live in aiea heights on Honolulu. Served on the USS Tucson. Loved it over there.
 

mikey

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Hey Chris, yeah, that tool thread is a monster! It was a lot of fun doing it, though. This one might be easier to swallow/assimilate.

I do agree with Ulma Doc and ttabbal that HSS will very likely work better for your machine. You do not have the speed, power or rigidity to fully utilize carbide and while carbide tools will still work, they won't work as well as they should because of the limitations of your machine. And it isn't just the machine; carbide tools, especially inserted carbide tools, require more familiarity and skill to use. HSS will typically cut what you dial in; not so with carbide.

There is a lot to this tooling stuff but the bottom line is that you will have a much easier time of it if you go with HSS tools. Grinding them is not difficult but it does take a bit of time to learn it. If you must get going and still wish to stick with HSS, look at the AR Warner line of inserted HSS tools. They work, they work well, and they are economical in that you can easily sharpen the inserts.

Glad to hear you know Aiea and Honolulu, Chris. Hawaii is a really nice place to live in, that's for sure.
 

Z2V

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Thanks, Travis. Chris, contact @Z2V to see if any model tool sets are available if you're interested.
Yes, there is still a set of Mickey’s tool models floating around. Chris, let me know if you are interested.
 

Chris_V

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So what would be a good beginner set of HSS cutting tools to buy? Looking on little machine shop there are many sets in the $160 price range. I don't mind buying the tooling but I do want to spend wisely.

I primarily see myself playing around making aluminum spacers for my four wheelers and other small projects. Maybe some carbon steal projects.

I won't be doing any mass production for profit.
 

ttabbal

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Pre ground HSS sets aren't a great deal. You can get blanks cheap on ebay and similar. Grinding them can be done with a cheap bench grinder. My favorite is the 2x72 belt grinder, but they get expensive unless you want to build one, which is a fun project. You will need some way to grind the pre made tools anyway as you will eventually chip them or similar.

For ready to go, the Ar Warner inserted tools mikey mentioned look great. I haven't used them though.
 

Chris_V

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I've been watching YouTube and playing with some brass fittings that I have laying around. The one HSS bit that I had in the tooling looked beat but I I managed to figyout how to make a cut with it. :)IMG_3736.JPG
 
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