My adventures with my RF-30

ARC-170

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4. MACHINE SPECS/FEATURES
For the "roll call" of machines, you mentioned some specs and features I have questions about. Here's my roll call with my questions:
A. I believe mine is a Rutland Tools RF-30 clone based on the other one that was for sale with it that came out of the same shop and had the ID plate on it (mine does not). The motor on mine has a 2009 date.

B. Number of pulleys: I have 3. I think I read that RF-30's have 3 and RF-31's have 4. Anyone know?

C. Fine feed type: how would I tell what I have? Here's a picture of the down feed on my machine. I took the handles off:
DSC00305.JPG

D. Spindle type: I have R8

E. I can zero my dials. Here's a picture:
DSC00304.JPG
F. What are these "adjustable nuts" and how do tell if I have any?

G. What is this "front cover plate" you are all referring to?
 

mickri

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4 B I have a manual for an RF31 and it shows only 3 pulleys.

4 C You have the typical plastic knob to engage the Z axis fine feed. I'll take a picture of the fine feed on mine after dinner and post it later this evening.

4 F The horizontal screw you mention in your post #20 is probably the backlash adjusting nut we have been referring to. Look at the parts diagram in the RF 30 manual I posted above. Look at part 15 on the last page. On the G0705 parts list it is part #233. You can see the adjusting screw head on the bottom of the part.

4 G The front cover is an aluminum plate on mine that covers a hole in the head casting that allows you to lubricate the quill. Your post #61 picture 3 in your previous thread is a good picture with the front cover removed on your mill/drill.
 

mickri

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Here is a picture of the knurled fine feed locking sleeve on mine. Screw the sleeve in towards the head to engage the fine feed and screw out to disengage. I found the dials on the X and Y to be accurate. Not so on the Z axis. One rotation of the Z fine feed on mine is supposed to be .090. In reality it varies around .085 give or take. Never the same and not consistent.

IMG_3940.JPG
 

Manual Mac

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ARC-170, as I understand it the “adjustable nut” in question F is the X axis lead screw nut.
Facing the mill, look under the right hand side of the table.
You will see the X axis lead screw, & the block/nut that it screws into is what I am referring to.
It will be real oily/greasy (hopefully) and hard to see, as it is towards the center of the table.
If you move the table to the right it will be closer & easier to see.
The adjustable one will have a 4mm allen head screw on the nut. This is for adjusting the backlash.
The nut itself will probably be brass or bronze. I have read some have cast iron nuts, I do not think these are adjustable, but i’m not sure.
Cheers
 

ARC-170

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4A. I think my machine is model Rutland #26660530. Rutland was bought by MSC awhile back. I looked on the MSC website and was able to find Rong Fu's, but that number returned ""3 Phase, 16-3/8" Swing, Step Pulley Mill Drill Machine" as no longer available. They don't seem to have any parts available, either. Incidentally, the alternative (a Rong Fu) retails for $2739, on sale for $2574.66.

4C. Yes, I have the plastic knob that screws in to engage the fine feed. Works well. Is one type better than another, or are they all equally good, but just different?

4F. It appears I have adjustable nuts. I've included some images.

My machine is on moving dollies, so I can look under it. This is a view looking up under from the front. You can see the back of the Allen bolt.
DSC00306 (2).JPG

Here is the same thing except from the rear of the machine. You can see the Allen bolt.
DSC00308 (2).JPG

Here is a view of the table nut. There is one Allen bolt on this side.
DSC00307 (2).JPG

4G. So the front cover is just the plastic cover over the z-axis screw, and the aluminum plate is that plate that has a sticker on it that unscrews, correct?
 

DavidR8

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4A. I think my machine is model Rutland #26660530. Rutland was bought by MSC awhile back. I looked on the MSC website and was able to find Rong Fu's, but that number returned ""3 Phase, 16-3/8" Swing, Step Pulley Mill Drill Machine" as no longer available. They don't seem to have any parts available, either. Incidentally, the alternative (a Rong Fu) retails for $2739, on sale for $2574.66.

4C. Yes, I have the plastic knob that screws in to engage the fine feed. Works well. Is one type better than another, or are they all equally good, but just different?

4F. It appears I have adjustable nuts. I've included some images.

My machine is on moving dollies, so I can look under it. This is a view looking up under from the front. You can see the back of the Allen bolt.
View attachment 342459

Here is the same thing except from the rear of the machine. You can see the Allen bolt.
View attachment 342461

Here is a view of the table nut. There is one Allen bolt on this side.
View attachment 342460

4G. So the front cover is just the plastic cover over the z-axis screw, and the aluminum plate is that plate that has a sticker on it that unscrews, correct?
4G strictly speaking there isn't a Z-axis screw. The spindle is moved by way of a gear that rides in matching grooves in the back of the spindle.
So the cover is really only covering the front of the spindle.
Screen Shot 2020-10-30 at 1.48.02 PM.png
 

ARC-170

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4G strictly speaking there isn't a Z-axis screw. The spindle is moved by way of a gear that rides in matching grooves in the back of the spindle.
So the cover is really only covering the front of the spindle.
View attachment 342466

You are correct, sir! The part I'm referring to is called the "Depth Stop Assy" that attaches to the "Quill Clamp" and has the "Depth Stop Block" on it.
 

mikey

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4F. It appears I have adjustable nuts. I've included some images.

The mills made by Rong Fu have an adjustable nut like yours. When properly oriented, the Y-axis nut has to be accessed from underneath the mill or you will have to raise it up to adjust backlash. It would be wise to provide access from the bottom. The X-axis nut backlash adjustment can be accessed by cranking the table all the way to the left.

It is clear that the clones of the RF mills have differences.
 

ARC-170

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3. STAND (continued)
I called the welder to see when could start on the stand and make sure the changes I made wouldn't cost any extra as he noted when we talked, but he said he forgot to include the material in the quote he gave me over the phone and the price was now $375. I have a call in to another welder, but I'm thinking a metal stand is going to cost a bit much. I thought the original $220 was pricey, but it was acceptable. He also told me the material was over $150 but I got quotes at a local metal supply place for about $100. I know welding isn't cheap, but I had something similar made a few years ago for $100. I can't find the name of the person though!

So, I designed another stand I could make out of wood. It's 4x4 posts supporting 2x4 cross members. Everything is bolted together with 3/8" bolts and nuts and washers. After seeing them load my machine in my truck supported by one 2x4, I think it's safe to build the stand out of wood like this.
In addition, I have 1/2" plywood panels screwed and glued to the outside. The bolt heads are installed flush so the plywood can go over them. I may even glue the 4x4's and 2x4's together. I will drill holes in the 2x4's to put the mounting bolts for the top in. The mill can then be mounted to the top. I plan to make the top at least 3/4" thick and may even double it up.
This design matches the rest of the garage (I built cabinets everywhere) and will help with any shear (think of the stand moving from a rectangle to a trapezoid).

I looked online for 2x4 load calculators and found one (http://www.timbertoolbox.com/Calcs/ddsimplebeam.html) that was easy to use that gave me a max load of 1130 lbs using "#2 Doug Fir-Larch" which is available at my local big box stores.

By the way, when I typed in one 2x4 for a 25" span and 660 lbs, the calculator indicated that this would hold without fail.

Here's a sketch of my design:
wood stand sketch.jpg
The mill rests on the top, so the load is spread out over the 4 posts and all the cross members, but the front and rear cross members are able to support the weight.

The depth dimension is driven by the depth of the mill base and location of the mounting holes, and the width dimension is driven by the width of the tool chest I'm putting under this.
 

Manual Mac

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ARC, look up instruction manual for Grizzly G1006/1007 mill drill. I believe this will pertain to your mill.
From your pics yours is pretty mush identical to my G1007. Mine says made in Taiwan in 6/2004.
Now would be a good time to buy a welder & a Harbor freight hand held band saw, they have the saws on sale often for $89. & I use mine often.
Prolly be a wash money wise instead of having one built. Just a wee bit further down the rabbit hole. And a 4-1/2 inch hand held grinder while U R at it.
If the wife complains, U can blame it on me.
Mikey I wonder why the sheet metal stand that most places sell with these mills don’t have the hole in them to adjust the Y leadscrew backlash? I guess cause not all the mills have adjustable screws. EDIT; also the tin top is designed to hold coolant, I forgot about that.
The stand I build will have that access for sure.
Cheers
 
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