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Chopper1

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#1
Looking for everyones ideas on moving heavy items in the shop. Chain fall, hoist, trolley, dolly, etc....and any combination of the options...basically using whats between the ears instead of your back. Thanks
 

Ed ke6bnl

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#2
Pallet jack when possinle
 

SubtleHustle

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#3
My shop is an UPSTAIRS room, that used to be an office for my wife. I really don't have any friends, other than guys I work with, and I hate asking for help....so, when i had me and me alone, to get an 800lb. Benchtop mill out of a truck, upstairs, and around into an "office" I built this gantry crane/trolley system, from bits from the scrapyard. That, along with a swing arm, and a winch I got the job done. It has worked for a couple other smaller pieces of equipment as well....and she said I bit off more than I could chew.... 20180610_121648.jpg
I got it up there with the swing arm, and worked it to my new shop with the crane/trolly....its all about mechanical advantage, when you roll solo!
 

dlane

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#4
I use my engine hoist
 

Shootymacshootface

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#5
My Farmall Cub w/ a loader does it for me.
 

mikey

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#6

HarryJM

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#7
Engine hoist works for me.
 

FOMOGO

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#8
Mostly use the backhoe. Mike
 

talvare

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#9
I use an engine hoist for the heavier lathe chucks, rotary table, etc. I made a shorter pair of legs for it so I can maneuver it closer in to the lathe. I've also used it many times for loading and unloading heavy items into and out of my truck and many other uses around the shop and garage. Even used it for it's intended purpose a few times :)

Ted
 

COMachinist

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#10
Yep got to go with the engine hoist. I have a 2000# capacity hoist and have used it to move and set everything from my old 3 in one bench machine to my latest lathe PM12x36t. I even used it to set a 50# air hammer although in a few peices, that weighs over 3000#. I live out in the country where my neighbors aren’t close and they usually aren’t available even if I know them. So all most every thing I do in the shop is by myself. The engine hoist has been invaluable to me, worth every cent.
Good luck
CH
 

projectnut

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#11
I use a couple things. Most often I use a hydraulic table to lift parts or fixtures to the mill table. I have a couple from HF. One has a 500 lb. capacity and the other has a 1,000 lb. capacity.
https://www.harborfreight.com/1000-lbs-capacity-hydraulic-table-cart-69148.html

The second most used thing is an overhead cable hoist. This is used primarily to lift heavy items to the mill or hydraulic table.
https://www.northerntool.com/shop/tools/product_200712244_200712244

Between the two I have been able to move various pieces of machinery into the shop, and lift parts and fixtures to the machines.
 

Downwindtracker2

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#12
I have some rigging, engine hoist ,1/2ton chain fall, but the thing that is really handy is a chain come-a-long.
 

Winegrower

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#13
The engine hoist is my go-to, when the hand truck is not suitable.

If you get an engine hoist, I suggest the 2 ton flavor...it is only marginally more, and remember the rated capacity is done at minimum boom extension, which limits how high you can lift. Go big.
 

ezduzit

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#14
A hospital patient lift is very handy around the shop where there isn't room for an engine/shop crane.
 

samstu

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#16
I use front end loader a lot - probably one of the most versatile things you can own. 1+ for engine hoist. But these require space and money.

For remote work or low budgets a monster bar with its long lever and a few pieces of pipe can move an amazing array of stuff. This particular model has a really durable head great for breaking concrete, construction demolition, etc.
monster.jpg
 

Chopper1

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#18
This has been great. 15 really good replies. So far I think the engine lift or shop crane has the most support, and I like the idea of the shorter legs for maneuverability.
I have 560TJI's for floor joists above my shop and have been thinking that a perpendicular run of lightweight beam with trolley and cable hoist for the midweight items might work well. Weyerhaeuser gives specs on what point loads for each type of fastener for their TJI's and I would think spreading the load out as opposed to running along (1) single joist to be optimal. I'll need to check with my engineering buddies on that one though.
 

jocat54

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#19
I use anything that will keep me from manually doing it:grin:. I have an old Ford tractor with front end loader, 2 ton engine hoist, chain hoist, hydraulic table, and a pallet jack. Lots of pry bars, come alongs, chains, ropes, ect.
 

A618fan2

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#20
I use a combination of engine hoist and 1 ton chain fall hoist for most things. For the chain fall, I use an inexpensive clamp on hook called a "Badger Clamp" Makes it very easy to move the hoist anywhere you can access a floor or ceiling joist. I think it's rated for 1000lbs.
IMG_0691.JPG
 

Z2V

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#21
Does that Badger Clamp have teeth that dig into the joist that you hang it from? You say it’s rated for 1k lbs, as long as the joist that you hang it on can hold the load. Looks pretty handy!!
 

KBeitz

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#22
I would like to know more about this Badger Clamp ....
 

samstu

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#23
Wow that badger clamp is cool. Never heard of it before.

Found this:
Badgerclamp.com. Made in the good old U.S of A! Has some cool accessories too. I NEED one.
 

tjb

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#24
Looking for everyones ideas on moving heavy items in the shop. Chain fall, hoist, trolley, dolly, etc....and any combination of the options...basically using whats between the ears instead of your back. Thanks
All the responses give great suggestions - I use several in my shop. Given that my crossover interest to machining grew out of building street rods, I have used an engine hoist, transmission jack and an automobile lift - each with varying degrees of applicability. They are not always practical, however, and in some instances can be made to work but involve a lot of time and setup. One particular application that I've found challenging is hoisting a 125 lb. rotary table on and off the milling machine. Below are some photos of a portable 'elevator' I made for this and other tasks. I had a headstock for a Harrison M300 lathe - I needed a shaft that cost $1,100 new. Bought the entire headstock for $300. That became the gearbox for the elevator. A motor that I took off an out-of-commission grain auger became the power plant. The chain is a section from a neighbor's old hay baler. Had to buy the casters and most of the metal (sigh) but for the most part, everything else was leftovers or scrap - even some of the bearings. The headstock is set at its lowest speed, and the gears for the chain drive reduce it even further. I made the height sufficient to lift the rotary table from a heavy duty shelf onto my mill's table. The process is simple: raise the elevator to the appropriate height; slide the rotary table onto it; lower (for center of gravity) and roll to mill; raise; slide onto the mill table; and you're done. Piece of cake.

I still have a little work to do: Wiring is not finished because I want to add limit switches; I need to add emergency stops along the lines of what's on an automobile lift; make a pushcart-style handle; and paint (maybe).

This thing works beyond my expectations and was a real learning experience to make.

Regards,
Terry

IMG_1534.JPG IMG_1535.JPG IMG_1541.JPG IMG_1542.JPG IMG_1545.JPG
 

bpimm

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#25
I have a gantry outside, a liftgate on the pickup, engine hoist, pallet jack, hand truck, electric hoist on the celing and one I haven't seen mentioned yet, I have an old fence streacher block & tackle, it's a double block on each end with a hook on both and a cam lock on the top, I use it for a lot of minor lifting around the shop like taking the vise on and off of the mill, I just clamp the bottom hook in the vise and lift it off. I was using a piece of chain with a bolt through the floor joist above as an attachment point which works but seeing that badger clamp.... I just ordered 4 of them. Christmas is taken care of. LOL
 

CluelessNewB

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#26
I use my OMT and an engine hoist. (OMT = Old Man Tractor currently a Kubota B3030, before that I had my Dad's OMT an Oliver 660) A pallet jack would be handy, maybe someday.
 

middle.road

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#28
Drat, doesn't look like the Badger will work on 2x8 rough-sawn.
Guess what the shop is made of?....
 

Boswell

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#29
they sell adapter to make it work for wider boards. I bet you could make an adapter so it would fit your rough-sawn boards.
 

GoceKU

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#30
Because of the 2 floor your best bet is a forklift, or a front end loader, see if there are any available for rent or borrow one when properly planned, the move goes very quickly.
 
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