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My First Clock - The Silver Lady

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Dataporter

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#1
We used to have a joke at my office about one of my talkative co-workers. The joke was, ask him what time it is and he would tell you how to build a clock! Well, I'm not going to tell you how to build a clock because Brian has written a book! Also, I don't know how to build a clock, yet... So what I am going to do here is just share my build of Brian's Dark Lady Clock. I'm hoping that if I get stumped or have a question, Brian or someone else here can share some advice. Brian did a thread right here on his build of this clock. Brian's plans are for building the clock with minimal tools and on the cheap material wise. I'm calling mine the Silver Lady because instead of blued steel for the frame of the clock I'm using some stainless steel that I have. The stainless brushed with a brass wheel looks silver and Silver Lady seems like a more romantic name than Stainless Lady. I'm also going to use more brass etc because I can. I'm using my 3 in 1 instead of a 7x10 mini lathe and I have rotary table / dividing head and some other tools. I elected to buy a mod 1 gear cutter. The plans are in metric and this is my first experience with metric. Most of my digital tools and my DRO switch from inch to metric with the touch of a button. My brain does not. I got a nice conversion chart and a metric ruler and a Harbor Freight 0-1" 0-25mm digital micrometer (which seems to be very usable). Of course, the good old USA missed the metric boat, unfortunately, and I have to use material that is the closest fraction of a inch in many places. I hope I don't screw that up!

Here's a picture from Brian's Website of what his clock looks like...

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#2
Here is some pictures of the frame (so far) and the assembly tools that I have made. I've actually improved the assembly tools a little. You'll see the improvements in later posts.

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#3
This is how I made the escapement wheels
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#4
The escapement arbor is shown in one of the last photos in the thread above. The arbor has to be concentric so both sides were turned and faced and the hole was drilled through the center without removing the stock from the chuck.
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#5
Here is a dress rehearsal of the escapement wheel assembly
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#6
Looking great keep up the good work.

Brian.
 

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#7
Here is the MOD 1 Cutter that I bought to cut the wheels (that's how a clock maker says gears, I guess). I made the arbor. Brian's Dark Lady plans have easy plans and instructions for making the cutter. I thought about making my own, I'm sure I could have, but in the end, I bought this one...

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Below is how I lined up the cutter to be on center. As a side bar, I was using this ER-40 chuck mounted in the Morse Taper 3 hole in the center of my rotary table. Before I cut the first gear, I decided to check the run out and it was nearly .010"! (0.25mm) I decided that was unacceptable and you will see later that I mounted my 5C chuck on the RT instead.

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My understanding is that the cutter can be sharpened many times by simply grinding the leading face of the cutter.
 
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#8
Cutting the Main Wheel. This is the first wheel or gear I ever cut! It was a little nerve racking, only because I hadn't done it before. Also, it seems like there are more than one way to mess this up.

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The clip is on there to mute the ringing while cutting
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The moment of truth, when you cut that last valley, will it form a perfect tooth with the first valley you cut??

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#9
Apparently, as a clock maker, first you cut the wheels, then you determine the ideal center dimension between the two wheels. Then you transfer this ideal dimension to the workpiece. So to do this you need a depthing tool.
So, I made one, and here it is...
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When I tried to just hold the wheels in my hand and run them against each other, it seems like a pretty funky meshing. However, mount the wheels on the depthing tool you can definitely tell they mesh much better when they are held and turned in the same plane. Then you have to determine where the sweet spot is, i.e. where they mesh and spin without binding each other.
 

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#10
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Above I'm checking the run out of the mandrel, before mounting some wheel blanks to turn to size.

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Below I am making the flanges that guide the wind cord over the drive wheel. I drilled and reamed the center holes first. Then I used the bolt circle function of my DRO to drill the holes for the mounting screws.
Then I rough cut them on the band saw before mounting on a mandrel and turning them to size as shown above.

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Below is the layout of the line cord stop
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Below I am using a slitting saw to cut the ratchet wheel.

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Below is getting ready to cut the teeth on the reverse minute wheel. The minute wheel is stuck to the mandrel with Loctite 603 because there is no way that little screw can hold on while cutting the teeth.
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Below I'm cutting the radial holes in the ratchet hub. We will eventually press little pivot pins in the holes for the weight rope to drive the ratchet assembly. This little chuck has a micro feed collar that lets you use your fingers to start and drill holes. Perfect for these little drills.
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Below I am making the two little pinion gears.
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Drilling the holes for the pivot wire that will be pushed in to the pinion to form the "teeth".
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Below I am sawing off the pivot wires with my dremel mounted on the tool post.
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The pinion gears are in the picture below one is on the left side of the depthing tool and the other is sitting on the wheel that is immediately below my 6 inch scale.
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#11
Crossing out the wheels. The second (as in first then second) and hour wheels need to have a little of their mass reduced.
Having never done this before, it was a little bit of a nail biter! But I think they came out nice for a first try.

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I dialed in the center of my rotary table and then I mounted a piece of sacrificial aluminum to the top of it. I drilled and tapped a 6mm x 1 hole in the very center.

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I also drilled two small 1/16" holes opposite each other on the pitch diameter of the gears. I cut off two small pieces of pivot wire and pressed them in the holes. This is so the gears when mounted on the aluminum can not turn.
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Now don't laugh. I took small piece of PVC pipe and made a ring and I clamped that ring over the wheels.
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I mapped out a plan to move the RT off to one side, half the width of the spoke plus half the width of the end mill. I would cut the sides of the spokes first. Then using trigonometry and my DRO, I would go back to center with the RT and use the RT to drop the endmill back in the slot and cut the inside of the curve.
I put a 1/8" end mill in the mill and moved to the start of the first cut.
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What I'm doing here is cutting the side of the spokes. moving the RT 72 degrees and cutting the side of the next spoke. etc. The endmill was center cutting and I was able to plunge straight down with it. I did peck at it to clear the chips and I could definitely tell when it cut through the top gear and begrudgingly started into the lower gear.
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Minor disaster! I broke the end mill off! Why? I think for these five reasons: 1) I wasn't running the mill at the fastest speed possible 2) The end mill was dull, this wasn't its first rodeo. I saw the big old burr it was kicking up above 3) The chips were fouling up the cut 4) It was an inexpensive import mill to begin with 5) It is a small endmill.

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So, luckily, I had another 1/8" mill, I kicked the speed up to max, I used my shop vac to suck the chips out of the way, and proceeded with reckless abandon.

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Back at it.

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Minor disaster #2! apparently I moved the RT to 211 degrees instead of 216 and made a cut. I'm blaming that on my daughter coming out to the shop and talking to me. Saving grace, the cut was mostly inside the material I was removing anyway. Having never done this, I was going to be fairly conservative with the size of the holes. Plan B! Make the holes bigger and the spokes thinner!

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This is DNC. Dave Numerical Control

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Whew! I made it!! Crop circles? DSCF0168 (Large).JPG

Couple of slices with a piercing saw and a few strokes with some Swiss files..

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#12
Nice work, and a good save! I also have a set of Dark Lady plans from Brian, but I have not yet had the chance to start on it.
 

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#13
Well that’s just one heck of a first try!!!! Lookin very nice! Good idea using a piece of PVC to hold down a wheel for spoking! Thank you for sharing!...Dave
 

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#14
Today I made the click and the spring for the ratchet assembly.
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#15
Hi Dave.
It's hard to determine the action from the photographs , but it looks to me that the pawl will start to lift on its underside rather than the tip
this will cause the tip to rise clear of the ratchet instead of following the contour, if this is the case just hollow out the underside of the pawl
so just the tip contacts the ratchet.
Great progress, just love your crossing out.
Brian.
 
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