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My first lathe arrived today

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emtor

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#1
Greetings from Norway.
My first lathe arrived today after years of drooling and lurking on forums.
I had two choices,-either buy a used lathe or buying a cheap China manufactured lathe.
A used lathe: Not many small lathes here. This is not the US or the UK, this is Scandinavia, and the only options for used lathes are leftover industrial machines.
Good luck with worn ways and lead screws and freighting heavy equipment long distances. Add to that installing 3-phase power in your home.
A lathe produced in China: You get what you pay for. Some large warehouses here have had chinese lathes in their inventory until most of what they sold were returned
due to very low quality. These warehouses have given up on selling these lathes.
One particular warehouse on the other hand has sold the same brand for 20 plus years and still going strong, which tells me that these lathes are perhaps quite good.

So I ordered one,-a 10X16 benchtop lathe weighing 260 pounds . . . weight matters.
No plastic handles or wheels, all steel/cast iron, even the chuck guard is made from solid steel.
Apron and cross slide moves super smooth with no slack or binding.
Compound rest wheel has a very slight tendency to bind at one spot every revolution. I'll look into that.
All gears are made from steel/cast iron,-no plastic.
Lathe bed is induction hardened.
No electronic speed control (less parts to fail). Speeds are chosen by placing the belt on the desired pulleys. 6 speeds by the way.
At this point in time the lathe appears to be a solid piece of machinery . . . I guess time will tell.
The lathe came with a three jaw and a four jaw chuck, live center, a large jacobs chuck for the tailstock, steady rest and nine carbide insert cutting tools.
They also threw in two bags of extra inserts, replacement gears and a toolbox with spanners etc. plus a bag with some stuff that I haven't figured out what is for yet.
I paid 2.400 $ with shipping to my front door included.
Next weekend will be quality time with cleaning and lubricating . . .


lathe.JPG
 

David S

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#2
Emtor welcome to the forum. So far it looks good. Please post more pictures when you get it out of the box and set up.

David
 

markba633csi

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#3
Welcome! Looks like one of the better made imports, you will have fun with that
Mark
 

emtor

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#4
I'll post pics during the weekend.
I do think it's one of the better ones, feels quite sturdy and solid.
The company that sell these lathes have been in business for decades selling the same brands and a friend of mine used to make electric guitars and bought all of his machines from them. He was surprised by the good quality and the low prices and excellent service.
Today we managed to get it inside but we did not take the chance of lifting it up on the bench. It was too heavy, so I bought a bunch of pulleys and rope and I'll bolt together a large wooden frame and use that together with the pulleys to hoist it up.
After that it's disassembly, cleaning and lubricating.
 

Al 1

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#5
Emtor, It looks nice. Have fun. Al
 

Janderso

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#6
I can feel your excitement.
Congratulations on your new lathe.
 

Dabbler

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#7
welcome to the forum! Looks like you are going to have a great time with your new machine!
 

BaronJ

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#8
Hi Emtor,

Nice looking lathe. It seems to have been well crated, better than some I've seen.
When lifting it be very careful not to trap and bend the leadscrew.
Better still get a couple of mates round and have a beer and lifting lathe party. :)
 

emtor

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#9
I'll be sure to mind the leadscrew.
I've bought some 2x4's, bolts and 6 pulleys plus rope today.
I'll bolt together a frame with a length of steel pipe on top.
Then I'll lift the lathe with the rope and pulleys fastened to the pipe and then roll the pipe till the lathe hangs above the
tool cabinet,-then lower it down onto the cabinet.
Yesterday we were three buddies trying to lift it. On the tailstock end you'll get a firm grip. The headstock end is a different matter.
Too easy to loose your grip so we abandoned the project.
6 pulleys will reduce the needed force by a factor of 6 plus friction which results in only approx. 20-25 kg force on the pulling rope.
 

BaronJ

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#10
Can you not use a sling under the bed at the headstock and three of you lift the lathe ?
 

emtor

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#11
Yes we could. This is the way they move pianos isn't it?
But . . . in the near future I'll be moving to Sweden,-(bought a house there this summer), so I'll be needing the frame anyway to move the lathe into the shed.
 

BaronJ

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#12
Hi Emtor,

Yes it is. I did wonder if you wanted to keep the crate in one piece. When I got my mill, you had to literally destroy the crate to get it out. It was bolted to the bottom, had struts nailed through the sides, in addition to the bits that were stapled in paper wraps.

Anyway, good luck and happy machining. :eagerness::eagerness::eagerness:
 

emtor

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#13
The crate is dismantled but easy to put back together again.
A crate will help protect the lathe while moving it to Sweden when that day arrives.
I'll keep the crate.
 

vtcnc

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#14
Congrats on your new lathe and welcome to H-M!
 

emtor

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Thanks vtcnc. Should have done this ages ago.
A new world has opened up. Suddenly junk has become stock material. I have a bunch of steel rods taken from printers that I planned on throwing away.
No way! These should come in handy some day. My neighbours better not leave the hood of their cars open for long. There's aluminium under those hoods. Nice for casting round stock. A lathe needs food :)
 
Last edited:

silence dogood

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#16
Emtor, what is the brand name of your lathe? Except for the color, it looks just like my Lathemaster 8x14 It's even the same weight as mine, 260 lbs. Harbor freight also sells one exactly like mine but they call it a 8x12. It is the 10x16 that I'm confused about. However, if it is what I think you got, it is a nice tough lathe. Mine has served me well. Yes. a lathe needs food. Also, quench its thirst with oil.
 

emtor

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#17
The lathe is a 10X16, CJ9525/400.
The shop also sells a 10x22 CJ9525/550. Exactly the same lathe but with a 22 inch bed.
Made by the Jiangsu Xima Machine Tool Manufacturing Co, Ltd.
The problem is that the chinese make products with the import company's name on them. The same lathe may come in a variety of colors and with different brand names. The company who sell these lathes here in Norway only has the model number from the manufacturer on them.
It would surprise me though if companies like Harbour Freight and Grizzly hasn't discovered this manufacturing company. This lathe really stands out compared to those light weight and cheap Sieg lathes.

I just doubled the weight in kg to get the weight in pounds, but that isn't quite accurate. The exact weight is 280 lbs (127 kg).

I watched a review last night on youtube. A Sieg from Harbour Freight. The guy cut the straps on the crate and pulled them loose.
The crate moved along with the straps across the bench easily. Try that with my lathe. We were three guys sliding this thing across the floor and we got a good exercise doing just that. Lifting it up onto the bench was out of the question. I guess we could have done it but it would have resulted in sore backs and busted knuckles.

When everything is cleaned, oiled and adjusted properly I'm sure the lathe will perform very well for it's size.
 

mrbreezeet1

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#18
The lathe is a 10X16, CJ9525/400.
The shop also sells a 10x22 CJ9525/550. Exactly the same lathe but with a 22 inch bed.
Made by the Jiangsu Xima Machine Tool Manufacturing Co, Ltd.
The problem is that the chinese make products with the import company's name on them. The same lathe may come in a variety of colors and with different brand names. The company who sell these lathes here in Norway only has the model number from the manufacturer on them.
It would surprise me though if companies like Harbour Freight and Grizzly hasn't discovered this manufacturing company. This lathe really stands out compared to those light weight and cheap Sieg lathes.

I just doubled the weight in kg to get the weight in pounds, but that isn't quite accurate. The exact weight is 280 lbs (127 kg).

I watched a review last night on youtube. A Sieg from Harbour Freight. The guy cut the straps on the crate and pulled them loose.
The crate moved along with the straps across the bench easily. Try that with my lathe. We were three guys sliding this thing across the floor and we got a good exercise doing just that. Lifting it up onto the bench was out of the question. I guess we could have done it but it would have resulted in sore backs and busted knuckles.

When everything is cleaned, oiled and adjusted properly I'm sure the lathe will perform very well for it's size.
Good for you sounds great.
I'm sure you will have a great time playing with your new toy. (E'r I mean using your new machine)
I was blessed to find a used Logan 10 in Montgomery Ward's. But the same as a 200 that cuts nice and straight at least for everything I've needed to produce on it. To be honest I never turned a test bar or test callers to check for taper but I generally just do little things or center drill something. Congratulations and enjoy. Quick question what is the diameter through your spindle? Sorry I did not read the whole thread if you already dis discuss that.

Sent from my MotoG3 using Tapatalk
 

emtor

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#19
Diameter through the spindle is 20 mm - 0.79 ".
Finding a Logan or equivalent lathe here is next to impossible.
Second hand lathes are usually industrial 3-phase monsters and smaller new lathes are expensive.
I was lucky to find this one.
Well . . . it is a toy. A lathe becomes a boring machine when you're forced to crank out hundreds of identical parts a day.
 

mrbreezeet1

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#20
OH OK, .790 isn't bad.
It has a back gear too?
The Logan spindle hole id under .750.
Sometimes wish mine was larger, Like the bigger logans. Logan 820 IIRC.
I have all My threading gears, And also added an wiper motor variable speed feed for the lead screw.
Worked out quite well.
 

silence dogood

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#21
The lathe is a 10X16, CJ9525/400.
The shop also sells a 10x22 CJ9525/550. Exactly the same lathe but with a 22 inch bed.
Made by the Jiangsu Xima Machine Tool Manufacturing Co, Ltd.
The problem is that the chinese make products with the import company's name on them. The same lathe may come in a variety of colors and with different brand names. The company who sell these lathes here in Norway only has the model number from the manufacturer on them.
It would surprise me though if companies like Harbour Freight and Grizzly hasn't discovered this manufacturing company. This lathe really stands out compared to those light weight and cheap Sieg lathes.

I just doubled the weight in kg to get the weight in pounds, but that isn't quite accurate. The exact weight is 280 lbs (127 kg).

I watched a review last night on youtube. A Sieg from Harbour Freight. The guy cut the straps on the crate and pulled them loose.
The crate moved along with the straps across the bench easily. Try that with my lathe. We were three guys sliding this thing across the floor and we got a good exercise doing just that. Lifting it up onto the bench was out of the question. I guess we could have done it but it would have resulted in sore backs and busted knuckles.

When everything is cleaned, oiled and adjusted properly I'm sure the lathe will perform very well for it's size.
Thank you Emtor, you have enlightened me, you really do have a 10x16. The model number of my lathe 8x14 is cq6120, which I believe is an earlier model. Jiamgsu company also makes a hd250 which looks just like the Harbor Freight 8x12 model 4459. I believe that the other model that Harbor freiht sells are Sieg. Grizzly sells a 8x16 Sieg lathe that weighs about 160lbs. My little Lathemaster 8x14 weighs a little over 250lbs. Apparently, the Jiagsu lathes are much more robust than the Siegs. You definately have some iron. Too bad there aren't more suppliers of your lathe brand here in the US.
 

emtor

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#23
I believe that the other model that Harbor freiht sells are Sieg.
Sieg lathes are sold here also. First time I saw a Sieg advertisement I thought they were Swiss made. Sieg would be a typical Swiss name.
Later I found out they were Chinese and that the cheaper models are at best toys and not performing very well as toys either.
There's a review here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DIEb-pzfwjQ

I guess there are four different kinds of lathes:
1) High quality "plug and play". No adjustments or tweaking needed.
2) Decent quality for the price. Needs to be set up and adjusted. No urgent need for replacing parts.
3) Basically decent. Needs adjustment and replacement of smaller parts like gibs, gears etc.
4) Really just a pile of scrap iron. After changing all the parts you're still left with uneven ways and misaligned headstock/tailstock etc.

Looks like the Jiangsu falls into category no. 2.

Before trying it out I'll dismantle and clean everything. Then I'll check for play and make the required adjustments.
Not much use in complaining about chatter if the lathe is not properly adjusted.
 

BROCKWOOD

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#24
Welcome & looking forward to your updates & projects.
 

mrbreezeet1

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#25
Yes, me too!
You know I have my logan, But the house l'm renting
(This is It Most Likely, entirely too too much stuff to think about moving again)
But (well everything is NOT set up to say the least, recent move, and I'm a "Slow Moving Train".....................LMAO)
But anyways, I have a smallish garage, But it's nice. Thats going to be kind of my metal working shop,(Albeit no mill)
And where the Logan resides.
The basement, Is going to be my woodworking area.
BUT, i would Love to have A small, even a 7X20 maybe one of those that is a Mill/Lathe combo. for in the basement.
been watching craiglist and facebook, but slim pickings. If they do come up, they are too $$$$$!
looking for someone that just wants to get rid of one reasonably.
Sans the mill, maybe even a craftsman 101.XXXXX lathe would suffice.
 

emtor

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#26
I'm renting an apartment here in Norway. There's two apartments in the building and there's one common storage room where the lathe will reside.
My neighbour doesn't care what I do with the room . . . he's male. Had it been a she all hell would break loose.
I own a house and an outhouse in Sweden seven hours away by car. I can't move there permanently until I retire, so until then I'll use the lathe here.
Speaking of Sweden . . . a guy nearby my house there has a large property with two enormous two story buildings on it.
Two monster lathes, one monster mill, a huge pillar drill, welding equipment, tons of hand tools, two mega hoists hanging from the ceiling, all kinds of metal stock material. This guy builds everything: -Tracked vehicles, hydrocopters . . . everything.
When moving there I'll be in the right neighbourhood.

I buildt a frame today and use a boat hoist and car tires to get the lathe up in the air so that I can get it placed on top of the lathe bench.
One tire finished, three to go . . .

lathe3.JPG
 

mrbreezeet1

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#27
I'm renting an apartment here in Norway. There's two apartments in the building and there's one common storage room where the lathe will reside.
My neighbour doesn't care what I do with the room . . . he's male. Had it been a she all hell would break loose.
I own a house and an outhouse in Sweden seven hours away by car. I can't move there permanently until I retire, so until then I'll use the lathe here.
Speaking of Sweden . . . a guy nearby my house there has a large property with two enormous two story buildings on it.
Two monster lathes, one monster mill, a huge pillar drill, welding equipment, tons of hand tools, two mega hoists hanging from the ceiling, all kinds of metal stock material. This guy builds everything: -Tracked vehicles, hydrocopters . . . everything.
When moving there I'll be in the right neighbourhood.

I buildt a frame today and use a boat hoist and car tires to get the lathe up in the air so that I can get it placed on top of the lathe bench.
One tire finished, three to go . . .

View attachment 274806
Good job of " Yankee engineering".
I need to do something to get my Oliver wood lathe bed and motor head assembly a backup onto the legs but mine will involve a motorcycle jack and wooden blocks Tractor Supply sort of a farm supply here they had a 3500 pound winch on sale for $60 I've been threatening to get one and I could attach it to the joist and lift her right up I may still do that if I do not put it off too long and they sell out the woman told me on the phone they had been there forever though at that sale price normally was about double that I should get off my butt and go get it today but I am running out of steam again.
I need to pick up a sling or two while I am there I don't know where all my chains are right now

Sent from my MotoG3 using Tapatalk
 

emtor

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#28
Same here. All my gear is a mess and laying around everywhere.
Go get that winch before it's gone.
Two tires up now and two to go . . . I prefer doing things on my own.

lathe4.JPG
 

T Bredehoft

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#29
Tires...
A fella's gotta do what a fella's got to do.

I'm proud of you, even the wood blocks where the wooden board isn't long enough.

You'll get the job done, no matter what it take.s
 

emtor

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Tires...
A fella's gotta do what a fella's got to do.

I'm proud of you, even the wood blocks where the wooden board isn't long enough.

You'll get the job done, no matter what it take.s
I'll get the job done,-redneck style. :grin:
 
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