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My Metalshop/drafting projects - "Make Your Own Tools"

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Buffalo Bob

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My first high school was Lane Technical School, in Chicago. A large school they had about every shop you could think of. A great preparatory school for college or profession. Mechanical drawing gave me the opportunity to plan and draw objects. Lots of good help but you will rue the day you had to produce a clean, ink drawn print. My heart goes out to the draftsmen and women I knew who made a living drafting until their eyes gave out. Plus the print checkers and engineers relying on their judgement and experience to correctly produce what was drawn. Geez...........

Anyway I have copied projects I worked to make your own tools and gauges. They are easy regarding precision and will allow you to learn new things.
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01A HAMMER HEAD.jpg 01B HAMMER HANDLE AND ASSEMBLY.jpg 02 HAMMER HEAD.jpg 03 DEPTH GAUGE ASSEMBLY.jpg 03A DEPTH GAUGE BASE.jpg 3B DEOTH GAUGE HANDLE AND PARTS.jpg 04 PARALLEL CLAMP ASSEMBLY.jpg 04A PARALLEL CLAMP JAWS.jpg 04B PARALLEL CLAMP SCREWS.jpg
 

Mike Nash

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I learned CAD so I could stop doing electrical drawings in pencil. Never mind pen.

But your depth micrometer plan has me wondering again why depth micrometers are SO expensive compared to a standard 0-1". Is it the base or the rods?
 

Buffalo Bob

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Re: My Metalshop/drafting projects - "Make Your Own Tools"

I learned CAD so I could stop doing electrical drawings in pencil. Never mind pen.

But your depth micrometer plan has me wondering again why depth micrometers are SO expensive compared to a standard 0-1". Is it the base or the rods?
Mike I too know "Pencil". BLGBWC (Before-Life-Got-Better-With-computers) I manually updated Bills of material, by hand, in pencil and recalculated on an adding machine. Then tried to get the numbers to balance. My automation was an electric eraser. Until the page wore through. Then added footnotes. LOTUS Ver 1a spreadsheet was a miracle. Then it all went downhill with MS.

Regarding the depth micro, I couldn't say. Just because they can I suppose. What's that old saying about needing more tools to make more tools? Try explaining that to my wife! Enjoy your day..
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is.php?i=1107711&img=05_V-BLOCKS.jpg 05 V-BLOCKS.jpg
 

gjmontll

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Bob

Thanks for the drawings and the memories they invoked. The hammer looks just like the one I made in my high school shop class about 50 years ago in NJ. Except, I think that we cast the aluminum grip around the steel handle shaft, then turned it down and knurled it. Or maybe that was just on the screwdriver handle; for sure, it had the aluminum grip.
I remember also making a cold chisel and a ***** punch. Other stuff I don't remember... I had the hammer until a few years ago. I thought I might still have the punch, but a quick trip to my toolbox says no.
That class was the first and last time I used a metal lathe until I started my home machine shop five years ago.

Greg
 

Buffalo Bob

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Re: My Metalshop/drafting projects - "Make Your Own Tools"

Bob

Thanks for the drawings and the memories they invoked. The hammer looks just like the one I made in my high school shop class about 50 years ago in NJ. Except, I think that we cast the aluminum grip around the steel handle shaft, then turned it down and knurled it. Or maybe that was just on the screwdriver handle; for sure, it had the aluminum grip.
I remember also making a cold chisel and a ***** punch. Other stuff I don't remember... I had the hammer until a few years ago. I thought I might still have the punch, but a quick trip to my toolbox says no.
That class was the first and last time I used a metal lathe until I started my home machine shop five years ago.

Greg
I worked in a machine shop for a while until I went back to school. Loved it. No matter how crude or misdirected my efforts were, the Tool & Die Makers were always so supportive. Always ready to show the right way to do things. At that time my best friend was a lead hammer. Had a few woodworking hobby/business for many years and returned to metalworking. It's a wonderful retirement hobby...

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http://www.MyEasyPics.com/pf.php?fid=8nu3egn0yr3zvog34s5s
 

davidh

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I was a draftsman for about 15 years, back in the late 50's. and today at a estate sale, I MISSED a complete set of Leroy lettering set with 6 or more templates / scales, the pen and different size tips in a beautiful wooden case. it had $20 on the price. I nearly bopped the fella on the head. . . . :) not really but it was a beautiful instrument from the past. . .
 
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What memories this thread brings back! I too remember making many drawings in drafting class. I never did any in ink, only in pencil, but I remember them well. I also fondly remember making a screwdriver (still have it), a number of cast aluminum projects, a small steam engine, and even a cannon. The cannon did not fire, at least not when it left the school, but a little bit of work with my dad's drill press and it worked just fine.

I am glad that you posted the drawings for the hammer, as something like that will be an excellent project with my granddaughter. Thanks for posting!
 

Bill C.

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I learned CAD so I could stop doing electrical drawings in pencil. Never mind pen.

But your depth micrometer plan has me wondering again why depth micrometers are SO expensive compared to a standard 0-1". Is it the base or the rods?
I always figured the price of the micrometer was due to it's brand name and number manufactured.

I too made a lot of pencil drawings in my day. Could never letter worth anything, used templates. Pick up CAD on my own, I use CadStd, free venison. It would have been nice to have had CAD back in my collage days. It came out after leaving school. The program then was like CadStd compared to what is used in todays engineering departments.



Thanks everyone for sharing your drawings.
 

Buffalo Bob

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Thanks for the memories. I also marvel how big companies like GE operated before Xerox machines. Carbon copies.. may six copies that are readable. Guess it's true that desperation leads to discovery. Thank goodness.... :)
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Don't mean to go off topic, but....

I almost forgot... when I was in high school we also made actual blueprints using specially reactive paper and ammonia. I only did it once, so I don't remember the exact process, but the results were cool.

When I first graduated from high school I worked in a machine shop for a year, and all of the prints were actual blueprints, hand drawn and blued. Some of the mills used NC (numerical control) using punched paper tapes to load the programs. If just one of the machine movements was wrong, the whole tape had to be remade. If there was a power outage, or even a power bump, the whole program had to be reloaded from the tape. The digital readouts on the control panels still used vacuum tube number displays. One machine, only a year old, had LED number displays. Digital dial calipers did not exist. Digital micrometers did, but the digital readout was mechanical, much like the old odometers in cars, and they were really expensive.

Enough of the trip down memory lane! Time to get back on the topic at hand!
 

Buffalo Bob

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Just bought a K&E 42" Jacob's Parallel Straightedge for $5. It's just beautiful. Fine grain mahogany and maple with a plastic edge. For drawing parallel lines with a drafting machine. Cool looking.

Regarding accuracy of micrometers, I tried to get the print dimensions as close as I could. Then the company inspector would use his mike like a C-Clamp. Squeeze it till it wouldn't move any more... and say I was under size. So accuracy in hand tools was sometimes subjective. Went to school on that and corrected any dimension error beforehand on the gang mill where the run was 40,000. Then had to deburr each one on a Ladish? machine. That's why I went back to school! But wish I was still there now. :)
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Mike Nash

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Man, I had almost forgotten about the "copier" I got for Christmas one year. I was probably 8 or 9 so that would have been around 1967-1968. It was actually a blueprint "machine". Slip your 8-1/2 x 11 sheet of paper around the plastic tube containing the UV tube along with the blueprint paper, close the flap over it and expose it. I don't really remember how the ammonia part worked then. But the blueprint was the older style where the lines were white and the background was dark blue.

I used to get some really cool stuff when I was a kid. Anyone remember the Ideal Kookie Kamera? Take a picture and crank the film down into the developer tank. Similar to the Polaroid. I still have that.

Kookie.jpg

Kookie.jpg
 

Tony Wells

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I still have the depth gage I made. Looks identical to your drawing. The hammer went away a long time ago. Made several since, but not with the care of that first one. Great memories.

The comment about C-clamps brings an amusing (to some of us, anyway) anecdote. We were enduring a customer quality audit, and one wise guy machinist, carefully laid out properly sized C-clamps on a shop towel at his work station. That and sunglasses and he passed as our blind machinist. It was NOT funny to me, as at the time, I was Director of Quality Assurance. After explaining the odd sense of humor to the auditor (major oilfield company), he thought it was hilarious, and we passed the audit with flying colors. I have other audit stories for other times.

Those are good projects for our beginning machinists, and when they have them in 30-40 years, they will remember this place as where they were inspired to make them. That makes this place worthwhile to me. Thanks for posting the "cartoons". I grew up drafting. Still have some of the instruments, but the table and machine are long gone. All CAD now. I don't miss hand drafting too much, but a little, yes.
 
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The comment about C-clamps brings an amusing (to some of us, anyway) anecdote. We were enduring a customer quality audit, and one wise guy machinist, carefully laid out properly sized C-clamps on a shop towel at his work station. That and sunglasses and he passed as our blind machinist. It was NOT funny to me, as at the time, I was Director of Quality Assurance. After explaining the odd sense of humor to the auditor (major oilfield company), he thought it was hilarious, and we passed the audit with flying colors. I have other audit stories for other times.
Amusing?? Ha!! That was downright funny!!! Thanks for sharing it!


Those are good projects for our beginning machinists, and when they have them in 30-40 years, they will remember this place as where they were inspired to make them. That makes this place worthwhile to me. Thanks for posting the "cartoons". I grew up drafting. Still have some of the instruments, but the table and machine are long gone. All CAD now. I don't miss hand drafting too much, but a little, yes.
My sentiments as well!
 

GK1918

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I was a draftsman for about 15 years, back in the late 50's. and today at a estate sale, I MISSED a complete set of Leroy lettering set with 6 or more templates / scales, the pen and different size tips in a beautiful wooden case. it had $20 on the price. I nearly bopped the fella on the head. . . . :) not really but it was a beautiful instrument from the past. . .
Holy smokes more than 50yrs since I had my hands on one of those!!
 

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A question regarding the hammer drawings. In them I notice that the spec is for CRS, and that you then harden it. Never having hardened anything metal in my life, I'm curious as to what product you would add to the heated metal. I understand Kasenit(sp?) is no longer available, what would be a suitable alternative?

Terry
 

Flammable_Solid

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Depending on the carbon content if the steel, you may only need to quench it fast enough after you let it dwell at the proper austenitizing temperature. You would then need to temper it.

Or you could case harden it by a few different methods too.
 
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i loved technical illustration in school.. taught a few classes too...hated cad
 
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A question regarding the hammer drawings. In them I notice that the spec is for CRS, and that you then harden it. Never having hardened anything metal in my life, I'm curious as to what product you would add to the heated metal. I understand Kasenit(sp?) is no longer available, what would be a suitable alternative?

Terry
I understand that there is a product available called Cherry Red that is similar to the old Kasenit product. Midway USA carries it, and most likely Brownell's does now too. Not sure about Enco or McMaster Carr, but you could do a search for it. If you find out anything, it might be worthwhile to start a separate thread on it, probably in the Shop Made Tooling forum.
 
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Looking at those drawing made me think of my school days at Pretoria Technical High school more than fifty years ago. I loved the technical drawing classes and couldn't wait for that period. I think we had three periods of technical drawings a week.
Willy
 

Round in circles

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Thanks for the memories. I also marvel how big companies like GE operated before Xerox machines. Carbon copies.. may six copies that are readable. Guess it's true that desperation leads to discovery. Thank goodness.... :)
BB

Carbon copies only six readable , when you needed a hundred or so copies that's when you used the big Gestetner duplicator that used waxed skins and inks . I would have hated to be a technical draughtsman with pens & pencils in a big company's drawing office . All sat on high stools at a massive counter balanced sloped drawing easel like little sand boys row after row, slowly destroying their eyesight , spines & lungs because everyone smoked at their desks in those evil days .

I used to do the technical drawing for valve radios and other such equipment as part of my electro mechanical apprenticeship & hobby back in 1966. I have no doubt that my drawings were used for all radios for there is no doubt that most of the drawings ended up a wireless even though I'd checked them several times .
.
 
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Bill C.

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Carbon copies only six readable , when you needed a hundred or so copies that's when you used the big Gestetner duplicator that used waxed skins and inks . I would have hated to be a technical draughtsman with pens & pencils in a big company's drawing office . All sat on high stools at a massive counter balanced sloped drawing easel like little sand boys row after row, slowly destroying their eyesight , spines & lungs because everyone smoked at their desks in those evil days .

I used to do the technical drawing for valve radios and other such equipment as part of my electro mechanical apprenticeship & hobby back in 1966. I have no doubt that my drawings were used for all radios for there is no doubt that most of the drawings ended up a wireless even though I'd checked them several times .
.

I have a cousin who had to give up drafting due to his eyesight. I think eye strain was causing bad headaches.
 

wnec65

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Wish now I had saved all my drawings from high school. I'd frame them and hang them in my shop.
 

RJSakowski

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I understand that there is a product available called Cherry Red that is similar to the old Kasenit product. Midway USA carries it, and most likely Brownell's does now too. Not sure about Enco or McMaster Carr, but you could do a search for it. If you find out anything, it might be worthwhile to start a separate thread on it, probably in the Shop Made Tooling forum.
Cherry Red is still available from Enco. It is a little hard to find; their online search engine is looking for surface hardening. It is on page 853 of their catalog. McMaster Carr also carries a surface hardening compound; search for case hardening. Sodium cyanide was commonly used in the past for case hardening. Presumably abandoned for health and safety reasons.
My first professional job was as an analytical chemist for a major battery manufacturer. One day the machine shop foreman brought in a covered stainless steel box with about 10 lbs. of sodium cyanide which they had used for case hardening parts. He was a bit concerned about safety issues. I did a bit of research on it and concluded that household bleach would convert the cyanide to harmless (relatively) CO2 and N2 gas. The reaction was rather violent so the bleach was added a drop at a time in a fume hood until the reaction completed. It took about three gallons of bleach to do the job. I still have that stainless steel box.
 

RJSakowski

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I had four years of drafting in high school. I remember the lettering lessons learning how to make perfect upper case and diminutive lower case lettering, 15 degree slant, as I recall. Also the old fashion pens with various sized nibs for different line widths. And scraping the India ink mistakes off with a razor blade. How about laying out a screw thread helix by transferring points on a circle to a side view and connecting the dots with a French curve?
 

Joe P.

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Thanks for sharing the shop projects, I wish I had better memories of my high school days. I went to a public high school in New York City in the late 70's, a time which was the city's finances were really bad. I remember the first day of my machine shop class seeing the lathes, milling machine and other machinery saying to myself that this is going to be great. The teacher told us straight out that there was no money in the budget for any supplies and he is retiring at the end of the year, all we needed to do to pass was show up. Everyone did homework or whatever they wanted while the teacher drank coffee and read the newspaper. I was so disappointed that I lost all interest in school and barely graduated. Ironically I also work for the City of New York and after 30+ years, I see the frustration that my shop teacher must of went through with all of the politics and bureaucracy. Sorry for the rant.


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