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My Precision Mathews PM935TV Arrival/Setup

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zmotorsports

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#1
My PM935TV knee mill finally arrived last Tuesday and I have spent a few days last week getting it set up and personalized a bit.

First off, I must say that now after having it for nearly a week it is everything I had hoped for. The quality is extremely high end and compliments my PM1340GT very nicely.

I will admit that when the driver backed up to my shop and opened the door, my stomach jumped into my throat and I wanted to strangle the driver. The mill had tipped over onto its' side, broken through the pallet and was leaning against the inside of the truck box. It didn't go all the way over onto its' side but more horizontal than vertical. Evidently the driver was a bit aggressive at driving and the mill had pulled the four large lag bolts right up and out of the pallet it was sitting on. I jumped all over the driver and asked if he didn't see the large "TOP HEAVY" lettering on each of the four sides of the crate. Needless to say I did NOT tip the driver on this delivery.

He wanted to close up the truck and bring it back to their dock and get it stood upright with a forklift. Although a forklift would have been the best alternative, I didn't think it would make it another 30 miles back to Salt Lake City without going the rest of the way over and for sure creating more damage. I also didn't want to wait another 5-months to get another one. I wanted to get it upright and inspect prior to making any definitive decision.

Here is how it showed up at my home/shop.
2md5fv4.jpg

2mnp5cw.jpg

After removing three sides of the pallet/crate to get a better look.
30ii0d3.jpg

Luckily my son had just gotten home and was able to help me because the driver was absolutely worthless as far as helping. All he wanted to do was bring it back to their Salt Lake City transportation hub and really didn't want me messing with it. My son and I got the engine hoist up into the back of the truck and strapped the top of the column. We raised it about as far as we could with the hoist and got the weight up off of the head and away from the side of the truck so I could get a better visual of it. All I could see at this point was the small handle for the RPM that was broken. I was able to push it the last few degrees to get it vertical and standing back on the pallet flat on its' base. We shifted/jockied it around so I could drive the lag bolts back into the pallet and then we used a 10k pound ratchet strap to secure it to the pallet.

Once we got it out of the truck, on the ground and somewhat in place in my shop we removed the remainder of the plastic wrapping and did a thorough inspection. Unbelievably there was NO damage with the exception of the small handle for the dial. I called QMT and Matt was busy but I informed Nicole about what had transpired and she was awesome. After speaking with Matt she called back to ask a few more questions and I forwarded the pictures that I had taken to Matt.

Here it is close to its' new home in my shop.
2my7vrc.jpg

This was the only damage. No big deal and Matt was great to get a new one in the mail immediately.
2z8svo1.jpg

I got the pallet cut down so I could lift the mill off of the pallet and get it sitting on the floor. I then commenced on taking measurements for a base. I needed to get the mill a few inches up to make it more comfortable. After exchanging information with a few members of the forum who already own this machine I had originally decided I was going to build a base that was 4" in height combined with leveling feet which were 2" for a total of 6" overall height gain. I really liked the height in which it was sitting on the pallet which was closer to 8" overall height. That did it for me, so I embarked on fabricating a base that would raise the milling machine a total of 8". The base would bolt directly to the bottom of the mill yet be slightly wider at the footprint and employ leveling feet.

I started with some 2"x4"x.125" rectangular tubing and some 2"square tube x .125" wall.
29v198h.jpg

I machined some threaded bungs and welded them to the rectangular tubing to anchor the mill to the base.
1431ekl.jpg

I then welded the 2" square tubing to the 2"x4" rectangular tubing as well as gusseted it for strength.
2chu8pg.jpg

5frwic.jpg

Base completed, painted and sitting in front of the milling machine ready for installation.
29ymgyb.jpg

And there she is, sitting on her new base in her new home.
29bbrxi.jpg

fyo9zm.jpg

2q3nhgp.jpg

16kaqv9.jpg

So far this all took place on Tuesday. The truck backed up to my shop door just before 2:00PM and by 7:30PM it was sitting in its' final resting spot.

Now on to Wednesday morning. I took a couple of days off work to get it all set up and put my shop back together so I wanted to get right after it. I installed my 220VAC/30amp plug and she purred like a kitten. So nice and smooth running. I noticed immediately that none of the collets fit in the spindle and I kind of was expecting that due to other threads that I have read.

Here is how to remedy that. There is a small set screw on the back side of the quill that must be loosened to remove the collar.
2j0feh4.jpg

Next use a spanner wrench to remove the collar.
2hdd6i9.jpg

Once the collar is broken loose it should spin out freely by hand.
1195y13.jpg

Collar removed.
10ga80y.jpg

Once the collar is removed there is a set screw with another one under it. The top one is a locking set screw, remove it. Then back the inner one out just enough so that the collets, drill chucks and other tooling will fit into the spindle/quill freely. Once you are happy with the fit, install the outer set screw and tighten. Then reassemble everything in reverse order.

Now on to tramming the head. Got her dead on in both axis.
rkwo0o.jpg

119uhk1.jpg

I also installed the Eason ES-8A onto the machine and got it all hooked up and operational.

More to follow.

Mike.
 

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zmotorsports

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#2
Now on the personalization of the machine. I temporarily used some "T" nuts from my hold down kit but I wanted to make some specifically for the mill vise. I also was anxious to make my first chips so this is project No. 1.

Installed a piece of 1" stock and commenced on bringing it to size.
2qw37yh.jpg

Picture doesn't do it justice, very nice finish for hot rolled mild steel.
sfz1vl.jpg

All sized up and ready to cut the slots for the "T".
34qjmzr.jpg

Grooves cut down both sides.
2ns0360.jpg

Drilling both holes prior to cutting. I am also playing with and experimenting with the DRO. I have never used a mill with a DRO before. Ours at work is "old school". My son talked me into getting the DRO and now I don't think I could be without it and I have only scratched the surface on its' features.
huk57m.jpg

Threaded and cut apart.
2mm5wg5.jpg

I had previously machined and threaded some studs for this purpose so now I decided to weld them together as these will be dedicated for milling vise only.
1z6fmut.jpg

I also machined some .100" thick washers to go under the nuts for the mill vise and had purchased some large flange nuts from McMaster Carr.
2n0lsv4.jpg

Now I decided to add some table protectors to keep the table looking nice. Ours at work looks like hell due to the abuse the table gets and although my son and I will be the only ones using this machine, I realize that accidents happen and tools or parts can get dropped. I purchased some black neoprene rubber and cut it to shape/size and notched to go around the mill vise fasteners.
2j0gg45.jpg

Stay tuned as next up is my pneumatic/power drawbar. By around 6:00PM on Wednesday I realized that I need to fabricate a power drawbar as this isn't going to fly. Changing tools around this frequently is time consuming.

Mike.
 

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JimDawson

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#3
Congratulations on your new mill. Your welding is beautiful, I wish I could do that well. Love the table covers.

The only problem I see is that your shop is way too clean.:rofl: Mine will never look like that.
 

drs23

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Congratulations on your new mill. Your welding is beautiful, I wish I could do that well. Love the table covers.

The only problem I see is that your shop is way too clean.:rofl: Mine will never look like that.
+1 on all the above.

Me & You both Jim on the clean shop thing.
 

dave2176

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#5
Mike,
I'm glad there wasn't more damage. It has been a long enough wait. It looks great though.
Dave
 

zmotorsports

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Thanks guys. I appreciate the comments.

As far as cleanliness, I despise a dirty shop. It flusters me to no end and I lose focus when I have a mess to work around.

When I leave chips on the floor from one night to the next because I know I am going to be continuing my mess the next day I find it hard to quiet my mind down and I end up thinking about the mess in the shop and can't relax.

Mike.
 

zmotorsports

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Now moving on to my power drawbar. By Wednesday evening the power drawbar was officially bumped to the TOP of the "To Do" list as I was already tired of switching tooling around by hand.

I dug through some scraps and found some aluminum plate and some .625" O1 drill rod along with some bronze bushing material. I had ordered some fittings a few months ago from McMaster Carr as I was slowly building up my supplies for the power drawbar.

The top of the mill has a bearing support with three (3) 6mmx1.0 SHCS that would be a simple attachment point with some longer bolts.
29olxk6.jpg

I chucked up a 7"x7"x.5" piece of 6061 aluminum in the four-jaw chuck on the lathe and aligned the offset for the spindle center.
2mhfypi.jpg

I drilled the hole with a 1" drill bit and then commenced boring it out to 1.375" diameter. The same as the top of the bearing support.
huhwyg.jpg

I then machined a step .150" deep to sit on the bearing support. This part probably wasn't necessary but I wanted it to be a close tolerance fit onto the mill.
ifaglf.jpg

33c7j9j.jpg

Test fit on the machine and measuring the bolt pattern.
286xrmh.jpg

Next up was to start the machining of the movable parts. I set up my new work stop because I knew these parts would be in and out of the vise multiple times.
2zhmot5.jpg

9hp16r.jpg

I then showed the lathe some love and started on the bushings.
so08j8.jpg

I arbitrarily picked 1" as my target diameter and nailed it spot on. This lathe is so nice to hit a dimension on, repeatably.
ehi2yh.jpg

I machined a step into the bushing so I could press them into the aluminum right up the shoulder.
3538hg4.jpg

I bored them to allow a couple thousands clearance for the .625" O1 drill rod to slide through. Test fit.
2u89v0n.jpg

Then moved back to the mill to bore out the plates to accept the bushings. Ended up with a .001" interference fit.
23iawsx.jpg

Holes bored and bushings completed.
2guba07.jpg

Bushings pressed in and butterfly gun installed on lower plate.
6xvybq.jpg

Top movable plate was drilled and lapped to mate to the end of the butterfly gun once the end cap was removed.
zk6cyd.jpg

Mocked up.
4kbscx.jpg

Using the bolt circle layout feature on the Eason DRO. I figured I paid for it I may as well learn how to use it. There are a lot of features I have only scratched the surface on as far as learning the DRO. I am so glad I let my son talk me into purchasing the DRO.
1z4laio.jpg

Test fit on the mill. Bolted right on.
ekotmo.jpg

Now on to the air line plumbing.
2d0fd04.jpg

Lastly on to the controls/buttons for activation. Using the end of the butterfly gun and a piece of scrap aluminum.
25ft08l.jpg

Lapped the aluminum and the valve body.
of66a8.jpg

Then moved on to machining the lever.
33zepkx.jpg

All of the components of the controls sitting out and ready for assembly as well as identifying a mounting position/location.
2i8aayu.jpg

I bent up a piece of steel to mount the switch next to the electrical switch for the mill. This will use the same mounting point of the electrical switch without having to drill or tap another hole(s). I also bead blasted and painted it gloss black.
2jaenas.jpg

And last but not least the finishing touches. I found a piece of 1" aluminum round stock to make a couple of large diameter buttons for the control lever.
mj4uuw.jpg

2gtt0ue.jpg

Installed and completed. Almost looks like it belongs there.
35ndl3m.jpg

That is it as far as modifications at this point. Overall I am just as impressed with the Precision Mathews small knee mill as I am the PM1340GT lathe. I am sure glad I spent a little extra and purchased the Taiwanese machines and for the most part I feel good about the purchase(s).

Mike.
 

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drs23

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#8
Another fine job Mike. I'm getting to the point where I'm wanting to do the same thing. Now if my scrap/drop buddy would just trickle the material in...
 

catoctin

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#9
And I thought the shipping companies only did this to me. Fortunately, nothing major happened to the mill. This could have been a real pain after waiting so long.

My 935 is somewhere in Nebraska right now on it's way to the Livermore depot. I expect it will arrive Thursday or Friday. Things should get very interesting then.

Thanks for the heads-up on the collet issue. I had almost forgotten that someone else had problems with that.

-Joe


My PM935TV knee mill finally arrived last Tuesday and I have spent a few days last week getting it set up and personalized a bit.

First off, I must say that now after having it for nearly a week it is everything I had hoped for. The quality is extremely high end and compliments my PM1340GT very nicely.

I will admit that when the driver backed up to my shop and opened the door, my stomach jumped into my throat and I wanted to strangle the driver. The mill had tipped over onto its' side, broken through the pallet and was leaning against the inside of the truck box. It didn't go all the way over onto its' side but more horizontal than vertical. Evidently the driver was a bit aggressive at driving and the mill had pulled the four large lag bolts right up and out of the pallet it was sitting on. I jumped all over the driver and asked if he didn't see the large "TOP HEAVY" lettering on each of the four sides of the crate. Needless to say I did NOT tip the driver on this delivery.

He wanted to close up the truck and bring it back to their dock and get it stood upright with a forklift. Although a forklift would have been the best alternative, I didn't think it would make it another 30 miles back to Salt Lake City without going the rest of the way over and for sure creating more damage. I also didn't want to wait another 5-months to get another one. I wanted to get it upright and inspect prior to making any definitive decision.

Here is how it showed up at my home/shop.
2md5fv4.jpg

2mnp5cw.jpg

After removing three sides of the pallet/crate to get a better look.
30ii0d3.jpg

Luckily my son had just gotten home and was able to help me because the driver was absolutely worthless as far as helping. All he wanted to do was bring it back to their Salt Lake City transportation hub and really didn't want me messing with it. My son and I got the engine hoist up into the back of the truck and strapped the top of the column. We raised it about as far as we could with the hoist and got the weight up off of the head and away from the side of the truck so I could get a better visual of it. All I could see at this point was the small handle for the RPM that was broken. I was able to push it the last few degrees to get it vertical and standing back on the pallet flat on its' base. We shifted/jockied it around so I could drive the lag bolts back into the pallet and then we used a 10k pound ratchet strap to secure it to the pallet.

Once we got it out of the truck, on the ground and somewhat in place in my shop we removed the remainder of the plastic wrapping and did a thorough inspection. Unbelievably there was NO damage with the exception of the small handle for the dial. I called QMT and Matt was busy but I informed Nicole about what had transpired and she was awesome. After speaking with Matt she called back to ask a few more questions and I forwarded the pictures that I had taken to Matt.

Here it is close to its' new home in my shop.
2my7vrc.jpg

This was the only damage. No big deal and Matt was great to get a new one in the mail immediately.
2z8svo1.jpg

I got the pallet cut down so I could lift the mill off of the pallet and get it sitting on the floor. I then commenced on taking measurements for a base. I needed to get the mill a few inches up to make it more comfortable. After exchanging information with a few members of the forum who already own this machine I had originally decided I was going to build a base that was 4" in height combined with leveling feet which were 2" for a total of 6" overall height gain. I really liked the height in which it was sitting on the pallet which was closer to 8" overall height. That did it for me, so I embarked on fabricating a base that would raise the milling machine a total of 8". The base would bolt directly to the bottom of the mill yet be slightly wider at the footprint and employ leveling feet.

I started with some 2"x4"x.125" rectangular tubing and some 2"square tube x .125" wall.
29v198h.jpg

I machined some threaded bungs and welded them to the rectangular tubing to anchor the mill to the base.
1431ekl.jpg

I then welded the 2" square tubing to the 2"x4" rectangular tubing as well as gusseted it for strength.
2chu8pg.jpg

5frwic.jpg

Base completed, painted and sitting in front of the milling machine ready for installation.
29ymgyb.jpg

And there she is, sitting on her new base in her new home.
29bbrxi.jpg

fyo9zm.jpg

2q3nhgp.jpg

16kaqv9.jpg

So far this all took place on Tuesday. The truck backed up to my shop door just before 2:00PM and by 7:30PM it was sitting in its' final resting spot.

Now on to Wednesday morning. I took a couple of days off work to get it all set up and put my shop back together so I wanted to get right after it. I installed my 220VAC/30amp plug and she purred like a kitten. So nice and smooth running. I noticed immediately that none of the collets fit in the spindle and I kind of was expecting that due to other threads that I have read.

Here is how to remedy that. There is a small set screw on the back side of the quill that must be loosened to remove the collar.
2j0feh4.jpg

Next use a spanner wrench to remove the collar.
2hdd6i9.jpg

Once the collar is broken loose it should spin out freely by hand.
1195y13.jpg

Collar removed.
10ga80y.jpg

Once the collar is removed there is a set screw with another one under it. The top one is a locking set screw, remove it. Then back the inner one out just enough so that the collets, drill chucks and other tooling will fit into the spindle/quill freely. Once you are happy with the fit, install the outer set screw and tighten. Then reassemble everything in reverse order.

Now on to tramming the head. Got her dead on in both axis.
rkwo0o.jpg

119uhk1.jpg

I also installed the Eason ES-8A onto the machine and got it all hooked up and operational.

More to follow.

Mike.
 

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zmotorsports

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#10
Another fine job Mike. I'm getting to the point where I'm wanting to do the same thing. Now if my scrap/drop buddy would just trickle the material in...
Thanks Dale, I appreciate the compliment.


And I thought the shipping companies only did this to me. Fortunately, nothing major happened to the mill. This could have been a real pain after waiting so long.

My 935 is somewhere in Nebraska right now on it's way to the Livermore depot. I expect it will arrive Thursday or Friday. Things should get very interesting then.

Thanks for the heads-up on the collet issue. I had almost forgotten that someone else had problems with that.

-Joe
Joe, good luck on the delivery and be sure to post up some pictures and thoughts of the unit when you get it.

Mike.
 

Stonebriar

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#11
I know what you mean about shipping companies. When I got my 935 the side and front of the crate was off and the top was sitting on the machine.
They had balanced the mill pallet on another pallet because the original didn't fit their pallet jack. The thing was just sitting up there half off and the bottom pallet was junk and half crushed. Luckily I had no damage.

Rick
 

zmotorsports

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I know what you mean about shipping companies. When I got my 935 the side and front of the crate was off and the top was sitting on the machine.
They had balanced the mill pallet on another pallet because the original didn't fit their pallet jack. The thing was just sitting up there half off and the bottom pallet was junk and half crushed. Luckily I had no damage.

Rick
Thankfully you didn't end up with any damage either. I know when that door opened on the truck my stomach leaped into my throat. I didn't know what to do or say for a moment.

Mike.
 

Smudgemo

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#13
Wow. My first reaction was feeling lucky mine arrived looking mostly like how RoadRunner got it in PA, but I should feel relief they did their job? Sounds like maybe. I'm just glad you like it since I recommended it so confidently.

And I feel the same about the DRO. The function I've used the most is the 1/2 position function to center the spindle on a part or a hole. I also go back and forth a lot between metric and Imperial when I'm making Harold Hall's projects (he works in metric, but I don't really want to.) Sure is handy.

-Ryan
 

zmotorsports

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Wow. My first reaction was feeling lucky mine arrived looking mostly like how RoadRunner got it in PA, but I should feel relief they did their job? Sounds like maybe. I'm just glad you like it since I recommended it so confidently.

And I feel the same about the DRO. The function I've used the most is the 1/2 position function to center the spindle on a part or a hole. I also go back and forth a lot between metric and Imperial when I'm making Harold Hall's projects (he works in metric, but I don't really want to.) Sure is handy.

-Ryan
Ryan, I agree about the 1/2 function. Once I saw that in the manual I used that a lot over the past several days. Very nice feature. I really liked how easy the bolt pattern feature was to use. It is very user friendly and I see myself using that a lot in the future.

I seem to always have my calculator on the lathe and one sitting on the mill table. I am going to start using the one on the DRO and noticed you can have it import to the axis of your choice once you calculate the dimensions. That is another feature I see myself using a lot in the future.

Mike.
 

rmack898

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#15
I was wondering when your mill was going to show up, I'm glad you had no major damage. I'm not sure I would have been as nice to the driver as you were.

Nice job on the base and power draw bar.
 

John Hasler

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I was wondering when your mill was going to show up, I'm glad you had no major damage. I'm not sure I would have been as nice to the driver as you were.
I'm not so sure I'd blame the driver. Maybe he had to take evasive action to avoid an accident. IMHO those lag screws should not have pulled out. Through-bolts would have been better, and I might have added diagonal bracing as well.
 

Smudgemo

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Thanks for the heads-up on the collet issue. I had almost forgotten that someone else had problems with that. -Joe
That would be me. They said to pull the part to access the screws to adjust, but didn't mention the set screw in the back and I never thought to look. Note that those are reverse threads, so now you have no excuse for getting it wrong.

-Ryan
 

zmotorsports

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That would be me. They said to pull the part to access the screws to adjust, but didn't mention the set screw in the back and I never thought to look. Note that those are reverse threads, so now you have no excuse for getting it wrong.

-Ryan
Good point Ryan, I forgot to mention that it is a left hand thread.

Mike.
 

darkzero

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#19
Congrats Mike, looking good.
 

zmotorsports

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Thanks Will. I appreciate that.

Mike.
 

zmotorsports

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I was wondering when your mill was going to show up, I'm glad you had no major damage. I'm not sure I would have been as nice to the driver as you were.

Nice job on the base and power draw bar.
Thanks Mac, I appreciate that.
 

nickmckinney

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I'm not so sure I'd blame the driver. Maybe he had to take evasive action to avoid an accident. IMHO those lag screws should not have pulled out. Through-bolts would have been better, and I might have added diagonal bracing as well.
I would have to agree, you can't blame a driver for an item coming loose from inside its packaging. I know for a fact you would lose any insurance claim with those pictures.

Thats a beautiful machine and a beautiful shop. I am the same way, I can't stand a mess or grease sitting around even though it seems to grow on its own.
 

Falcon67

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#23
That is a very nice machine. You're braver than I am - in spite of the wait I'd have likely just refused delivery. There's no excuse for a large heavy expensive item to show up with the crate in that condition. I don't know about Salt Lake, but I've seen how the bob tails drive in Fort Worth, Dallas and Atlanta and it's not pretty. And I drive fast in traffic. Having stated such, these machines put up with a lot of guff. You think about the trip from the factory to your door and all the bump and grinding that occurs in between, then we stand 'em up and fuss over .0005 per foot of adjustment. :))

Like the stand - have to remember that when I finally get up into the knee mill territory. Nice shop too, like the layout.
 

zmotorsports

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That is a very nice machine. You're braver than I am - in spite of the wait I'd have likely just refused delivery. There's no excuse for a large heavy expensive item to show up with the crate in that condition. I don't know about Salt Lake, but I've seen how the bob tails drive in Fort Worth, Dallas and Atlanta and it's not pretty. And I drive fast in traffic. Having stated such, these machines put up with a lot of guff. You think about the trip from the factory to your door and all the bump and grinding that occurs in between, then we stand 'em up and fuss over .0005 per foot of adjustment. :))

Like the stand - have to remember that when I finally get up into the knee mill territory. Nice shop too, like the layout.
Thanks Chris. I appreciate that.

I am anal about my tools/equipment. Had it shown even the slightest bit of damage more than that broken handle I would have not unloaded it and refused it. However, it appeared to be a "soft" lean and it really didn't come crashing all the way down that is why I opted to right it on the pallet and take a closer look.

After just seeing the small handle is when I opted to off-load the machine into the shop.
 

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#25
Wow Mike, the mill and lathe compliment your shop nicely, or is it the other way around! Anyway glad damage was minor and look forward to seeing your projects.

David
 

zmotorsports

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#26
Thank you David, I appreciate that.

I do like what I see when I walk into my shop from the front door. I thought I had it arranged nice before but everything seems to "flow" better now as far as equipment placement. I also am glad I hung the electrical and air lines from the ceiling as I hate having cords and hoses lying across the floor when feeding machines. It is one thing when running an air gun or a drop light momentarily or intermittently, but to feed machines permanently I hate things on the floor.

Thanks again.
 

maker of things

Hermit
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#27
Mike, you should be careful floating those clean shop pictures around. People might feel peer pressure to clean up their shop too. In middle school we were taught that peer pressure is bad.

Now if only there was a way you could make a new handle for your mill...

-Jon
 

zmotorsports

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#28
Mike, you should be careful floating those clean shop pictures around. People might feel peer pressure to clean up their shop too. In middle school we were taught that peer pressure is bad.

Now if only there was a way you could make a new handle for your mill...

-Jon
Thanks Jon, no need to have to machine a new handle. Matt threw one in the mail and I have already received it. Pretty good customer service if you ask me.
 

rpmMan

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#29
Mike

Very nice work.. and when I grow up I want a shop like yours..

rich
 

zmotorsports

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#30
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