[4]

Need forklift advice

[3]
[10] Like what you see?
Click here to donate to this forum and upgrade your account!

strantor

Active User
Registered
Joined
Oct 29, 2012
Messages
571
Likes
271
#1
I got a great deal on a forklift through one of my customers. I don't know much about forklifts and I think I might have gotten something unsuitable for my needs. My plans for this thing were to bring heavy stuff to/from the yard and the shop. This forklift won't drive 3ft across dry dirt or grass before it gets "stuck."

The first and most obvious problem is the tiny and smooth warehouse tires. They suck so bad that I swear I saw them lose traction sitting on dry level pavement with the forklift turned off.

The other problem is the forklift has a differential which isn't of the "limited slip" variety, and no suspension. So any time it gets on a surface of unspecified flatness, one wheel comes of the ground, and that wheel is invariably a drive wheel, and the drive wheel just spins in the air. "Stuck"

Do I need to send this forklift back? Trade it in? Is the problem with the forklift or the operator (me)? Is there anything I can do to make this forklift work for me?

Note: the forklift is "stuck" in all attached pictures. It got "stuck" 5 times on the trip from the street to the shop on the temporary wooden driveway.
 

Attachments

Glenn Goodlett

Active Member
Registered
Joined
May 22, 2017
Messages
40
Likes
20
#2
Those aren't worth a dam except in a warehouse, where they shine. You need an all terrain or rough terrain fork lift.

Kind of like you got a dump truck to use as a tow truck...it just won't work.
 

Bob Korves

H-M Supporter - Sustaining Member
H-M Platinum Supporter ($50)
Joined
Jul 2, 2014
Messages
5,509
Likes
5,828
#3
If you are using a forklift off of hard surfaces like asphalt or concrete, all terrain types with pneumatic tires make more sense. They are bulkier, which makes for better traction, but they are also wider, which makes moving stuff around in a tight shop a lot more difficult. A skid steer or small tractor can also be a good idea depending on how heavy the loading will be and what other jobs you might have for it. You have a big place showing in the pics, so maybe a fork lift, skid steer, or tractor would be good to have around for other jobs as well. Fork lifts and tractors are wonderful when you need them, but they are also prone to lack of care by the owner, and tend to be cantankerous when actually needed after sitting idle outside for months. Renting one when needed negates taking care of it, and being able to borrow one from a neighbor can be worth a LOT of being kind in return.
 

FOMOGO

Active User
H-M Supporter - Gold Member ($25)
Joined
Sep 2, 2013
Messages
1,797
Likes
1,721
#4
Definitely designed for flat surfaces. If your needs require use on uneven surfaces, and you got this at a great price. I would sell it and find one with pneumatic tires. Mike
 

Downunder Bob

H-M Supporter - Sustaining Member
Staff member
H-M Platinum Supporter ($50)
Joined
May 16, 2016
Messages
963
Likes
388
#5
Can you fit larger dia wheels preferably pneumatic with tread. Alternatively trade it in on one more suitable for the intended use.
 

strantor

Active User
Registered
Joined
Oct 29, 2012
Messages
571
Likes
271
#6
I talked to the guy I bought it from and he was very understanding. He is willing to take it back. I think I'm going to return it and instead buy two things:
1. Used tractor with pallet forks for getting things to/from the shop.
2. Used Straddle stacker for moving things around inside the shop.
 

Ken from ontario

H-M Supporter - Silver Member
H-M Supporter - Silver Member ($10)
Joined
Dec 26, 2016
Messages
878
Likes
633
#7
I would love to have one of those 3 wheel forklift that hangs on the back of flatbed trailers, I have gravel driveway with a steep slope , couldn't believe my eyes when HD delivery guy used it to deliver a few heavy skids from the street all the way down the driveway and dropped them off right in front of the garage door, he went up the gravel driveway back and forth without slipping sliding not even once, the type I'm talking about looks similar to these :


linde24.jpg pl17914291-lifting_6_meters_3_ton_electric_forklift_triplex_wide_view_mast_small_electric_fork...jpg
 

Ed ke6bnl

Active Member
Registered
Joined
Nov 20, 2014
Messages
488
Likes
207
#8
I have an old Clarke 1960 ish, got if for free runs on propane and is gutless and can get stock everywhere 4 wheel smooth and small. but in the High desert that we live in the ground is normal very hard and I can ride it all over the fearly level portions of the property, I did pick up a tire tread cutting tool and was thinking of grooving the tires. also I am good till my front tire goes over a gopher hole and it can sink in and stuck. learned and a more careful where I go. Make life easier for my age to get some jobs done. Check what the limitations are on your bucket for your tractor.
 

Silverbullet

Gold
Registered
Joined
May 4, 2015
Messages
3,408
Likes
1,656
#9
On dirt and sod only wide balloon tire lifts will work. We have two next door they're air tires and if they hit the dirt or sand they sink and spin. The type sod farms use and big delivery services have that hang on the trailer behind a semi is what your talking about. If you had a bobcat or that type tractor it will go most anywhere . But we've even had people get them buried and stuck . Fork attachments are plentiful , you could build a four wheel jib crane with a hitch and use a garden tractor to move items.
 

strantor

Active User
Registered
Joined
Oct 29, 2012
Messages
571
Likes
271
#10
I want a bobcat SO bad, but the prices are outrageous.
 

vocatexas

Active Member
Registered
Joined
May 8, 2017
Messages
115
Likes
123
#11
For moving things around with forks, a skid steer loader would be much more flexible than a tractor. They will turn on a dime and can pick up a lot more than tractor forks. As Strantor said though, they ain't cheap. Plus, they are more maintenance intensive than a tractor. That said, I wouldn't trade mine for anything except maybe a larger 'dozer.
 

rock_breaker

H-M Supporter - Sustaining Member
H-M Platinum Supporter ($50)
Joined
Dec 31, 2010
Messages
532
Likes
257
#12
I have a Branson 3510 tractor with a front loader that I made a fork lift attachment that replaces the bucket. The fork lift or bucket goes in an arc so the lifting capabilities decrease near ground level. With 4 wheel drive it will go most places which can be troublesome on really rough ground, things fall off the pallet. It is relatively maneuverable but requires concentration on the work at hand. I like the convenience of having an excavator or fork lift.
Have a good day
Ray
 

Bob Korves

H-M Supporter - Sustaining Member
H-M Platinum Supporter ($50)
Joined
Jul 2, 2014
Messages
5,509
Likes
5,828
#13
I want a bobcat SO bad, but the prices are outrageous.
They can also be tricky to drive, or at least they were 30-40+ years ago, not hydraulic. I still remember one of our mechanics trying to move one without any previous training or experience. He immediately ran into the wall, hard, and the recoil from that made him pull the handles, and the acceleration made him go forward again to bounce off the wall again. And again, and quite a few more times. We were all screaming at him "LET GO". But he couldn't hear us over the engine. He finally figured it out and let go. He was WIDE awake. We couldn't stop laughing all day. I am glad I learned how to drive one AFTER watching that spectacle. I was VERY careful...

First rule of Bobcats for me -- when in doubt or trouble, let go of the controls.
 

Bi11Hudson

Artificer00
H-M Supporter - Gold Member ($25)
Joined
Feb 13, 2017
Messages
197
Likes
230
#14
I'm not real big on "skid steer" loaders. I prefer several attachments for my Cat. 1 three point. If there is room, the front bucket will reach on the roof of an old house with bolt-on forks. When things are tight, or the load real heavy, the three point has several attachments from a "skimmer" bucket to a fairly long reach pole. Any and all of them have shackles for a chain or come-along to budge stuff.

My tractor is old, and two wheel drive, but I never had it stuck. Slipped a few times when I hooked on to a tree stump that was tighter than the tractor was heavy. My bad judgement there. A home-made explosive device broke the stump loose. Another story, though. Tractor tires are cheap compared to other machines, too. The hydraulics usually have a way to tap into, even for cheaper or smaller tractors. Some stuff is bought, some is "imagineered", with regards to Disney for instituting a useful word.

With a more modern 4 wheel drive tractor, front bucket, and some thought, you will find not only a solution to your existing problems, but an easier way to handle things that usually are done manually. My input only, but I would vote for a small farm tractor any day over a more specialized machine. I live in the older city by the way, not out in the country. Although I do have a place out there, most of my work is local.
Bill Hudson​
 

strantor

Active User
Registered
Joined
Oct 29, 2012
Messages
571
Likes
271
#15
I'm not real big on "skid steer" loaders. I prefer several attachments for my Cat. 1 three point. If there is room, the front bucket will reach on the roof of an old house with bolt-on forks. When things are tight, or the load real heavy, the three point has several attachments from a "skimmer" bucket to a fairly long reach pole. Any and all of them have shackles for a chain or come-along to budge stuff.

My tractor is old, and two wheel drive, but I never had it stuck. Slipped a few times when I hooked on to a tree stump that was tighter than the tractor was heavy. My bad judgement there. A home-made explosive device broke the stump loose. Another story, though. Tractor tires are cheap compared to other machines, too. The hydraulics usually have a way to tap into, even for cheaper or smaller tractors. Some stuff is bought, some is "imagineered", with regards to Disney for instituting a useful word.

With a more modern 4 wheel drive tractor, front bucket, and some thought, you will find not only a solution to your existing problems, but an easier way to handle things that usually are done manually. My input only, but I would vote for a small farm tractor any day over a more specialized machine. I live in the older city by the way, not out in the country. Although I do have a place out there, most of my work is local.
Bill Hudson​
Yes, the small farm tractor is the direction I'm leaning. Next week I'll waste some people's time at the nearby mahindra and Kubota dealerships and figuring out what size tractor I need and what features. Then I'll probably go buy a used one.

Maybe you can help out a stranger tractor salesman and answer me this: how big if a tractor do I need to lift a 1000lb pallet and put it on a 9' high pallet rack?
 

JimDawson

Global Moderator
Staff member
H-M Platinum Supporter ($50)
Joined
Feb 8, 2014
Messages
7,053
Likes
5,255
#16
I got a great deal on a forklift through one of my customers. I don't know much about forklifts and I think I might have gotten something unsuitable for my needs. My plans for this thing were to bring heavy stuff to/from the yard and the shop. This forklift won't drive 3ft across dry dirt or grass before it gets "stuck."

The first and most obvious problem is the tiny and smooth warehouse tires. They suck so bad that I swear I saw them lose traction sitting on dry level pavement with the forklift turned off.

The other problem is the forklift has a differential which isn't of the "limited slip" variety, and no suspension. So any time it gets on a surface of unspecified flatness, one wheel comes of the ground, and that wheel is invariably a drive wheel, and the drive wheel just spins in the air. "Stuck"

Do I need to send this forklift back? Trade it in? Is the problem with the forklift or the operator (me)? Is there anything I can do to make this forklift work for me?

Note: the forklift is "stuck" in all attached pictures. It got "stuck" 5 times on the trip from the street to the shop on the temporary wooden driveway.
Yup, that's a warehouse forklift, but looks like a nice one. Not good at all for off road. Mine works fine on my hard pack gravel drive, but definitely will not work off of the hard pack gravel, it will get stuck in the loose gravel at the drive edges. There is a reason I have two forklifts, one for use in the shop and drive, the other is a 4WD all terrain machine.

Nothing you can do to make it work off of the drive. If you want to run across the grass, you have going to need a forklift designed for that purpose.
 

Shootymacshootface

Active Member
Registered
Joined
Mar 17, 2018
Messages
86
Likes
57
#17
I have 1958 Farmall Cub with a loader. It has assisted me with countless cords of fire wood, lifted many engines that range from a big block Chevy to complete v6 outboard motors. Other tasks are snow removal, and mowing the lawn. I find that if it cannot lift an object, I can push or roll it. I pushed my 3000lb mill across my garage floor. I couldn't imagine life around here without it.
 

rock_breaker

H-M Supporter - Sustaining Member
H-M Platinum Supporter ($50)
Joined
Dec 31, 2010
Messages
532
Likes
257
#18
Answering your "How big" questions can lead to bad results, but I believe the dealers have that type of specifications. They also sell used equipment. Perhaps that information is on the internet too. A safety margin of 10% popped into my mind, no real basis for that however. I don't believe my Branson 3510 will lift 1000 pounds from the ground. One experience I had involved lifting a box of tools out of the rear end of a freight truck but when lowering it to the ground the rear wheels of the tractor came off the ground. If the dealers sell front loaders they will probably tell you the capacity of the bucket (which is a good thing to know), from that you can calculate the approximate lifting capability. One table in the Caterpillar hand book list dry loose sand at 2400 Lbs. per cubic yard, damp sand at 2850Lbs. per cubic yard and wet sand at 3100 bs. per cubic yard. Wet clay is 2800 Lbs. per cubic yard. I would use the lessor of these weights to calculate the lifting capacity. Some unknown reason now tells me to use 2100 Lbs. per cubic yard in order to allow for the weight of the lifting frame. If I have confused you PM me.
Have a good day
Ray
 

strantor

Active User
Registered
Joined
Oct 29, 2012
Messages
571
Likes
271
#19
I am still considering the tractor (especially all of its added utility) but reading the lift capacities on these buckets has me leaning once again toward a forklift. In order to match the 5,000lb lifting capacity of this little forklift, I would need a tractor of probably 90hp, which wouldn't even probably fit in my shop and I would have to sell one of my kids to afford it.

So what do you gents think of this forklift? The seller assures me that it will drive across dry ground, and its appearance does suggest a higher aptitude for off-the-pavement operation than my little warehouse forklift, but it still isn't an "off road forklift."
 

Bob Korves

H-M Supporter - Sustaining Member
H-M Platinum Supporter ($50)
Joined
Jul 2, 2014
Messages
5,509
Likes
5,828
#20
A tractor will not have as much maneuverability in your shop as some of the other options if it is at all tight in there, most of our shops are jam packed with machines and stuff.
 

rgray

Active User
H-M Supporter - Gold Member ($25)
Joined
Nov 26, 2012
Messages
1,007
Likes
526
#21
So what do you gents think of this forklift? The seller assures me that it will drive across dry ground, and its appearance does suggest a higher aptitude for off-the-pavement operation than my little warehouse forklift, but it still isn't an "off road forklift."
That one will do it. Much better. Still will want to stay off the grass or any unpacked ground.
 

Bi11Hudson

Artificer00
H-M Supporter - Gold Member ($25)
Joined
Feb 13, 2017
Messages
197
Likes
230
#22
I don't have a need to lift that much weight that high so have little insight to the problem. From an imagineering perspective, what comes to mind is linking a forklift mast to the 3 point base. Hydraulics would be standalone, with the pump driven from the PTO. Counterweights hung from the front of the tractor et al. Just look at the way a full time back-hoe is constructed.

What it comes down to is that most machines were primitive early on. Then as specific needs were recognized or developed, the modified machines were fine tuned for each specific application. That's the beginning of the industrial forklift, as well as most any highly developed machine. To retrofit such a machine to another application would be much more difficult(and likely more costly) than to start with the primitive machine and figure out how to adapt it to the job. Just look at the overall generalized frame of a forklift, it greatly resembles a tractor. Mast on one end, steering and counterweight on the other. Engine and aux stuff in the middle.

Hence my reference to a farm tractor as a starting point. Yes, it's bigger. But the front bucket concept is not the best answer. It will lift a half ton (actually 600 Kg) to a height of some 16 feet, for my tractor. Small as farm tractors go, some 27 HP, but much larger footprint than the fork lift. But as a starting point, a whole nuther matter..... If one is interested enough to buy (cheap) a forklift that doesn't work as well as thought, what would it take to do the job?

Let us start with the mast, which would give the necessary lift. A scrapped out forklift would provide that. Remove the 3 point lifting bars and make a frame to fit between the tractor and the mast. Bolted (or pinned) to the frame, welded to the mast. Hydraulic pump from the PTO, don't try to tap into the average tractor system. An 18 to 20 HP tractor would have sufficient power but wouldn't weigh enough by itself. So, counterweights... But the front axle wouldn't stand up to that. So, beef up the front axle and add some counterweights. Starting to look like a forklift, huh? Actually I used to have a 15 HP machine that would handle that half ton without counterweights. The mast and forks would be a part of that half ton though. No tilt, but on an inside job not really necessary. Outriggers, Feet? Couple of tons there.

That would be my perspective for the problem, anyway. Just imagine what was wanted and build a contraption to do the job. When finished, unbolt the contraption, rehang the 3 point bars, and loan the tractor to a neighbor. Or plow the back 20. Assuming the front 20 was the shop. And dwelling......
Bill Hudson​
 

strantor

Active User
Registered
Joined
Oct 29, 2012
Messages
571
Likes
271
#23
I don't have a need to lift that much weight that high so have little insight to the problem. From an imagineering perspective, what comes to mind is linking a forklift mast to the 3 point base. Hydraulics would be standalone, with the pump driven from the PTO. Counterweights hung from the front of the tractor et al. Just look at the way a full time back-hoe is constructed.

What it comes down to is that most machines were primitive early on. Then as specific needs were recognized or developed, the modified machines were fine tuned for each specific application. That's the beginning of the industrial forklift, as well as most any highly developed machine. To retrofit such a machine to another application would be much more difficult(and likely more costly) than to start with the primitive machine and figure out how to adapt it to the job. Just look at the overall generalized frame of a forklift, it greatly resembles a tractor. Mast on one end, steering and counterweight on the other. Engine and aux stuff in the middle.

Hence my reference to a farm tractor as a starting point. Yes, it's bigger. But the front bucket concept is not the best answer. It will lift a half ton (actually 600 Kg) to a height of some 16 feet, for my tractor. Small as farm tractors go, some 27 HP, but much larger footprint than the fork lift. But as a starting point, a whole nuther matter..... If one is interested enough to buy (cheap) a forklift that doesn't work as well as thought, what would it take to do the job?

Let us start with the mast, which would give the necessary lift. A scrapped out forklift would provide that. Remove the 3 point lifting bars and make a frame to fit between the tractor and the mast. Bolted (or pinned) to the frame, welded to the mast. Hydraulic pump from the PTO, don't try to tap into the average tractor system. An 18 to 20 HP tractor would have sufficient power but wouldn't weigh enough by itself. So, counterweights... But the front axle wouldn't stand up to that. So, beef up the front axle and add some counterweights. Starting to look like a forklift, huh? Actually I used to have a 15 HP machine that would handle that half ton without counterweights. The mast and forks would be a part of that half ton though. No tilt, but on an inside job not really necessary. Outriggers, Feet? Couple of tons there.

That would be my perspective for the problem, anyway. Just imagine what was wanted and build a contraption to do the job. When finished, unbolt the contraption, rehang the 3 point bars, and loan the tractor to a neighbor. Or plow the back 20. Assuming the front 20 was the shop. And dwelling......
Bill Hudson​
I can picture everything you're describing and it sounds badass, albeit a little involved. I was originally thinking of something like a pallet stacker attachment that would bolt to the front of my big 60" zero turn mower, turning the mower into a limited capacity forklift. I have most of the stuff to do it, and it would probably suit most of my needs inside the shop, but what I don't have is time. that's why I decided to buy instead of build. I bought badly, and wasted even more time that I can't afford to waste any more. If I were going to buy a tractor and immediately start modifying it, i would probably do something quick & dirty like hang couterweights off the ass end and put higher volume, higher pressure cylinders on the existing bucket, weld plates all over it to beef it up, and just turn it into a more capable lifting machine trying to make the most use of what is already there and the most use of my time.
 

Downunder Bob

H-M Supporter - Sustaining Member
Staff member
H-M Platinum Supporter ($50)
Joined
May 16, 2016
Messages
963
Likes
388
#24
I can picture everything you're describing and it sounds badass, albeit a little involved. I was originally thinking of something like a pallet stacker attachment that would bolt to the front of my big 60" zero turn mower, turning the mower into a limited capacity forklift. I have most of the stuff to do it, and it would probably suit most of my needs inside the shop, but what I don't have is time. that's why I decided to buy instead of build. I bought badly, and wasted even more time that I can't afford to waste any more. If I were going to buy a tractor and immediately start modifying it, i would probably do something quick & dirty like hang couterweights off the ass end and put higher volume, higher pressure cylinders on the existing bucket, weld plates all over it to beef it up, and just turn it into a more capable lifting machine trying to make the most use of what is already there and the most use of my time.
Is it possible to just put larger dia. wheels on it that have some tread. will that get you out of trouble?
 

Downunder Bob

H-M Supporter - Sustaining Member
Staff member
H-M Platinum Supporter ($50)
Joined
May 16, 2016
Messages
963
Likes
388
#25
My go to machine is what we call a dingo over here. a small skid steer machine smaller than a bobcat you don't sit in it, you stand on the back on a small platform, your body weight is part of the counterweight. I hire it from the local machine hire shop. comes with a variety of attachments including fork blades, a bit limited on lift height, only about 6ft. but enough for me. Got it for the weekend for $100 when I picked up my lathe from the freight depot. used it to lift the lathe off the trailer and position it on a subframe I had already made. Worked a treat.
 

strantor

Active User
Registered
Joined
Oct 29, 2012
Messages
571
Likes
271
#26
Is it possible to just put larger dia. wheels on it that have some tread. will that get you out of trouble?
I don't think so. The bigger problem as I see it is the differential and (lack of) suspension. it's like when you go to eat at a restaurant and they put at a table where the ground is unlevel or the legs aren't all perfectly the same length, so the table teeters back and forth, only ever having 3 legs on the ground.

As soon as the ground gets unlevel enough for one of those wheels to come off the ground, it's one of the front drive wheels, because all the weight is in the back. That drive wheel comes off the ground and then the diff starts doing what a non-LSD diff does, and spinning the wheel that's up in the air. And when I say "up in the air" I mean like 1/4" off the ground. This thing can literally get "stuck" on pavement if it isn't level enough. A small pothole is the end of the road. I don't see how bigger tires are going to fix that.

P.s. I have tried the old "power brake" trick to "lock" the diff and it does work to a limited extent, but the lift barely has enough power to overcome its own brake, and it makes weird noises and smells.
 

Downunder Bob

H-M Supporter - Sustaining Member
Staff member
H-M Platinum Supporter ($50)
Joined
May 16, 2016
Messages
963
Likes
388
#27
I don't think so. The bigger problem as I see it is the differential and (lack of) suspension. it's like when you go to eat at a restaurant and they put at a table where the ground is unlevel or the legs aren't all perfectly the same length, so the table teeters back and forth, only ever having 3 legs on the ground.

As soon as the ground gets unlevel enough for one of those wheels to come off the ground, it's one of the front drive wheels, because all the weight is in the back. That drive wheel comes off the ground and then the diff starts doing what a non-LSD diff does, and spinning the wheel that's up in the air. And when I say "up in the air" I mean like 1/4" off the ground. This thing can literally get "stuck" on pavement if it isn't level enough. A small pothole is the end of the road. I don't see how bigger tires are going to fix that.

P.s. I have tried the old "power brake" trick to "lock" the diff and it does work to a limited extent, but the lift barely has enough power to overcome its own brake, and it makes weird noises and smells.
1. If the bigger wheels will work should be easy enough to lock the diff, or fit an LSD kit to it and if the tyres were a bit soft , aka low pressure would that cope I guess it depends on how rough your ground is and how far you have to go.

2. Someone mentioned converting an old tractor to a forklift, this is done quite a bit over here where contractors have to deliver house bricks and other building materials to building sites that are all chewed up and muddy, etc.

They get an old tractor and set up a forklift mast (probably second hand) onto the rear of the tractor and attach a suitable hydraulic pump and set of control valves, they work a treat handle really rough ground can lift a few tons and get good height,all depends on the size of the forklift mast you use.

One trick is the closer you can mount the mast to rear wheels the more you can lift without going overboard on counterweights.
I've seen some that get real sophisticated and fix it so the seat will swivel around to face the rear and have the fork controls set up there.
 
Last edited:

strantor

Active User
Registered
Joined
Oct 29, 2012
Messages
571
Likes
271
#28
if the bigger wheels will work should be easy enough to lock the diff, and if the tyres were a bit soft , aka low pressure would that cope I guess it depends on how rough your ground is and how far you have to go.
How do you mean lock the diff? Like as in open it up and weld it? The turn radius on these things is crazy and that's owed in part to the diff. I can't imagine how it would respond to tight turns with a locked diff.

The tires are solid rubber BTW. I don't know if it is possible to put pneumatic tires on it. But if it is possible, I imagine that would make an an appreciable difference. But honestly I'm just disgusted with this lift and I don't feel like it deserves any special attention.
 

rock_breaker

H-M Supporter - Sustaining Member
H-M Platinum Supporter ($50)
Joined
Dec 31, 2010
Messages
532
Likes
257
#29
Another $0.02 worth. I cannot get my tractor through the doors so all my forlift usage is out side and either pipe rollers or a 1000# furniture mover (4 casters on a low frame) do the machine moving. I like the machine Downunder Bob described if you could find one here. It seems the decision maker is how often the machines must be moved and to where. Good luck
Ray
 

JimDawson

Global Moderator
Staff member
H-M Platinum Supporter ($50)
Joined
Feb 8, 2014
Messages
7,053
Likes
5,255
#30
I am still considering the tractor (especially all of its added utility) but reading the lift capacities on these buckets has me leaning once again toward a forklift. In order to match the 5,000lb lifting capacity of this little forklift, I would need a tractor of probably 90hp, which wouldn't even probably fit in my shop and I would have to sell one of my kids to afford it.

So what do you gents think of this forklift? The seller assures me that it will drive across dry ground, and its appearance does suggest a higher aptitude for off-the-pavement operation than my little warehouse forklift, but it still isn't an "off road forklift."
That one will run around on packed gravel, but don't try to take it in the grass unless the ground is really hard and flat. To really run off road, you need much bigger tires or the balloon tires that you see on the turf delivery forklifts.

Something like this would be in the ballpark of having some off hardpack capibility
 
[6]
[5] [7]
Top