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Need help with my hammer....

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KBeitz

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#1
I love going to our local junkyard and finding thing to fix. I'm always looking for anything with a broken handle.
Like ax heads or hammers. I found this head that I'm going to call it a parting hammer. I really have no idea
what it is. I googled for an hour looking at all kinds of hammers and I can not find anything that looks even
close to what i found. I make handles with a shave horse and draw knifes. After i made the handle I have no
clue which end to put the handle in. Should the curve curve to the right or left? Anyone have any idea what this
hammer was used for? It's 7" from the head to the single claw.Weighs 4 lbs.

Parting hammer.JPG
 

KBeitz

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#2
Pic 2.JPG
 

Ken from ontario

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#3
I googled for an hour looking at all kinds of hammers and I can not find anything that looks even
close to what i found
I guess it could be some type of shop made hammer used in auto body repairs, I found a few pictures of similarly shaped:
Vintage-Auto-Body-Shop-Tools-Hammers-Dolly-Dollie.jpg IMG_1483.jpg images.jpg
 

ELHEAD

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#4
I would guess so,etching from railroad construction or maintenance.
Dave
 

RJSakowski

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#6
Nice looking hammer handle. I would guess that it is a blacksmith's tool. Blacksmiths were the engineers of their time and were constantly inventing tools that would make their work easier.

At first glance it looks very unwieldy. Is there any evidence that the hammer end was struck? I was thinking in terms of a fullering tool used to make grooves in a horseshoe but it appears too large for that. From the curve, it looks like if it were placed in a groove in hot metal, it would preferentially displace metal toward the outside of the curve.

This page has a number of similar tools. https://www.google.com/search?q=ful...MKHcytBqsQ9QEwAXoECAIQBg#imgrc=JuyFbOL_UnkSBM:
 

RJSakowski

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#7
From the size and weight, it would have been struck by the blacksmith's helper using a sledge. It could have been used as the starting tool for making tenons in some heavy iron, possibly architectural.

The struck end looks fairly pristine suggesting that the design was too radical to work properly and was discarded.
 

KBeitz

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#8
It sure was used...The cutting end looked untouched. The hammer end I retouched up with
a grinder to remove the rolled edges. Looking close it looks very well made.
 
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