[4]

Need some advice on first tooling for new PM-30MV

[3]
[10] Like what you see?
Click here to donate to this forum and upgrade your account!

AndrewH

Swarf
Registered
Joined
Nov 25, 2017
Messages
15
Likes
4
#1
Hey guys, the PM-30MV that I ordered just shipped and will be to me on Monday, so I’m planning to purchase a couple sets of end mills and maybe a face mill. Here’s what I’ve found so far:

E5E2A41E-C4D3-4322-949F-70755EED585D.png

87852D75-8A1F-45B0-994C-F2FB6FF1C43C.jpeg



Anything wrong with these choices just starting out? I figured this would cover me for mild steel and aluminum for now. I’ve also got my eye on this face mill:


4890FAA3-8DE6-41B3-B924-C88BD0E0C60E.png

So I figured that would get me started, any thoughts? Comments? Better suggestions?

Thanks guys!
 

Bob Korves

H-M Supporter - Sustaining Member
H-M Platinum Supporter ($50)
Joined
Jul 2, 2014
Messages
5,400
Likes
5,732
#2
I suggest you stay away from carbide as a newbie(?). Carbide is brittle breaks easily, especially on less than rigid machines. Learn how to get the right feeds and speeds with high speed steel, and learn how the metal and the chips talk to you when you are too slow, too fast, feeding too hard or too light, and what all that feels like to your hands on the machine and to your ears. You will break stuff unless you are lucky or going too slow and/or too easy, in which case you will dull the tools quickly. After you do that for a while, and have studied and learned things more, then take some baby steps with carbide. It gets annoying and frustrating watching $20-50 tools break one after the other...
 

markba633csi

H-M Supporter - Gold Member
H-M Supporter - Gold Member ($25)
Joined
Apr 30, 2015
Messages
2,768
Likes
1,434
#3
Like Bob said- use HSS cutters for a while first. And do some aluminum milling first before trying to mill steel, just to get the hang of it.
You will find that you have to feed slower and take shallower cuts in steel, and while you can usually cut aluminum dry, with steel you usually
need to drip a little oil on while you cut.
Mark
ps I recommend getting a small fly cutter rather than a face mill
 
Last edited:

Grandpop

H-M Supporter - Silver Member
H-M Supporter - Silver Member ($10)
Joined
Jan 20, 2016
Messages
61
Likes
61
#4
I would highly recommend a set of end mill holders with side screws to prevent those end mills from pulling down, and a starter collet set. Most other accessories I would wait till you actually need them before you purchase them. I bought a lot of stuff that still have not used in 3 years.
 

Aukai

H-M Supporter - Gold Member
H-M Supporter - Gold Member ($25)
Joined
Oct 4, 2016
Messages
422
Likes
361
#5
The good stuff is noticeably better than the imported HSS you can get, but HSS is way cheaper to learn on. Operator induced error will consume bits. One of my life sayings is "experience is something you get right after you needed it" I am learning the new language the machine is trying to teach me, sound and vibration tell you a lot. If you already have the experience disregard, otherwise these gentlemen speak volumes.
 

AndrewH

Swarf
Registered
Joined
Nov 25, 2017
Messages
15
Likes
4
#6
I suggest you stay away from carbide as a newbie(?). Carbide is brittle breaks easily, especially on less than rigid machines. Learn how to get the right feeds and speeds with high speed steel, and learn how the metal and the chips talk to you when you are too slow, too fast, feeding too hard or too light, and what all that feels like to your hands on the machine and to your ears. You will break stuff unless you are lucky or going too slow and/or too easy, in which case you will dull the tools quickly. After you do that for a while, and have studied and learned things more, then take some baby steps with carbide. It gets annoying and frustrating watching $20-50 tools break one after the other...
My apologies, I should have been a little more clear in my original post. I do (some) manual machining and a whole lot of CNC machining for a living (automotive parts), this is just the first mill that I’ve bought for my home so I’m by no means a total beginner.

I was mostly asking about their quality because at work we use Tungaloy and Seco tooling with a couple others sprinkled in but for the most part their prices are too high for a non-production environment so I’ve been looking around for lower cost alternatives.

I do absolutely appreciate your response, I have some cheaper HSS end mills to get a feel for this specific machine and once I do I plan to move on to carbide pretty quickly. Ultimately this machine will be converted to CNC, but of course I’m going to play with it in the meantime.
 

BGHansen

H-M Supporter - Gold Member
H-M Supporter - Gold Member ($25)
Joined
Nov 23, 2014
Messages
885
Likes
2,223
#7
Congrats on the new mill! Assuming you have a vise, some T-nuts, edge finder, R-8 collets, drill chuck, etc. Perfect timing as Christmas is coming up; lots of things you could ask for as gifts.

Bruce
 

AndrewH

Swarf
Registered
Joined
Nov 25, 2017
Messages
15
Likes
4
#8
Congrats on the new mill! Assuming you have a vise, some T-nuts, edge finder, R-8 collets, drill chuck, etc. Perfect timing as Christmas is coming up; lots of things you could ask for as gifts.

Bruce
Thanks! I am pretty excited to get it, most of my experience is with machines quite a bit larger so I’m sure there will be a small learning curve compared to running Mori Seiki, Gleason and Saginaw machines.

Should definitely be an adventure, especially when I convert it to CNC.
 

BGHansen

H-M Supporter - Gold Member
H-M Supporter - Gold Member ($25)
Joined
Nov 23, 2014
Messages
885
Likes
2,223
#9
You're gonna love the CNC. I bought a Bridgeport mill about 3 months ago really for the mill, not the 1985 Anilam 2-axis CNC. Love the mill but have a little buyer's remorse as I now want the 3rd axis. I'll upgrade mine at some point with a quill control like Jim Dawson added, new motors, controller, etc. Really makes me more productive and "cool" stuff with curves, tapers, etc. are a snap with a computer turning the wheels.

Just drove through Three Rivers by the way, headed to NSG (Pilkington) who supplies our GM assembly plant with windshields and back glass.

Best regards, Bruce
 

mksj

Active User
H-M Supporter - Gold Member ($25)
Joined
Jun 12, 2014
Messages
1,857
Likes
2,269
#10
So back to your original question, I see no problem with using carbide or cobalt end mills, yeah we all make a few mistakes but we are learning. I primarily use 3 flute for aluminum, and those look like the ones you are looking at are ZRN (might help) coated. I can get 6+ months on carbide and I usually break a tooth from something stupid. May want a backup on the sizes you use the most, for me it is 1/4, 3/8, 1/2 and 3/4". May want a fine rougher for quick material removal, I also use combination end mills that are both a rougher and fine finish like the Minicut (powdered Cobalt). Climb milling for aluminum, some air and light lubricant. Otherwise I go with 4 or 5 flute for steel, etc. I have a bunch of 2 flutes, rarely use them as I get much better performance and less vibration with 3 and 4 flute. I would get a better insert end mill, maybe Shar's or Glacern should be able to swing a 3" on that size mill. You can also look for better brands like Iscar, Seco, etc. on evilbay. I also pick up a lot of name brand cobalt and carbide endmills there, although it is getting uncommon that ther is any bargains anymore. I did just pick up a bunch of Wadia 1/2" 3 flutes that work great in aluminum.
 

wrmiller

Chief Tinkerer
H-M Supporter - Gold Member ($25)
Joined
Mar 21, 2013
Messages
3,386
Likes
1,366
#11
Hey Mark, just a heads up regarding referring to Ebay by any other name. I did, mashing two common terms, and was accused of being "disrespectful" or some such. The post was altered by the same moderator.
 

19E60

H-M Supporter - Gold Member
H-M Supporter - Gold Member ($25)
Joined
Feb 21, 2017
Messages
33
Likes
24
#12
I have an Accusize face mill, it's their higher end Northward brand, a very nice piece.

Would also recommend an ER collet set and R8 chuck. I started with ER32 generic off ebay. Just recently got the Techniks ER40 set and a Shars ER40 chuck and am very satisfied. Either size should be fine, depending on your needs.

I am very pleased with YG-1 tooling (I have some of their end mills, spotting drills, and spiral taps). Made in Korea and very nice.
 

tq60

Registered
Registered
Joined
Jan 11, 2014
Messages
636
Likes
373
#13
My apologies, I should have been a little more clear in my original post. I do (some) manual machining and a whole lot of CNC machining for a living (automotive parts), this is just the first mill that I’ve bought for my home so I’m by no means a total beginner.

I was mostly asking about their quality because at work we use Tungaloy and Seco tooling with a couple others sprinkled in but for the most part their prices are too high for a non-production environment so I’ve been looking around for lower cost alternatives.

I do absolutely appreciate your response, I have some cheaper HSS end mills to get a feel for this specific machine and once I do I plan to move on to carbide pretty quickly. Ultimately this machine will be converted to CNC, but of course I’m going to play with it in the meantime.
Get in good with the guy in the tool crib as the worn out stuff or obsolete sometimes get tossed.

Small mills and solid carbide do not get along but carbide inserts work if you can get decent holders.

The collet with set screws are handy as easy to change but only need maybe 3/8 and 1/2 and harbor freight once sold a decent set of 2 and 4 flute end mills for reasonable price.

We get most of our tooling in the used department of a local machine dealer where one end is chilled but other good for a buck.
 

AndrewH

Swarf
Registered
Joined
Nov 25, 2017
Messages
15
Likes
4
#14
Brought it home yesterday! It’s currently disassembled in my basement due to PM forgetting to include the leveling feet on the skid. I feel all 690 lbs this morning..

16E95DAB-9168-434E-B48A-5E5BFC4998A4.jpeg
 

19E60

H-M Supporter - Gold Member
H-M Supporter - Gold Member ($25)
Joined
Feb 21, 2017
Messages
33
Likes
24
#15
Congratulations Andrew, Christmas came early! Good job getting it into your basement, hope your back is still intact.

Afaik, leveling feet would not be included, as that would be left up to the individual's particular requirements.

Enjoy your new mill.
 

AndrewH

Swarf
Registered
Joined
Nov 25, 2017
Messages
15
Likes
4
#16
Congratulations Andrew, Christmas came early! Good job getting it into your basement, hope your back is still intact.

Afaik, leveling feet would not be included, as that would be left up to the individual's particular requirements.

Enjoy your new mill.
I ordered them with the mill, $17/piece! Sure wish they were included!

I’m sure they’ll make it right.
 

19E60

H-M Supporter - Gold Member
H-M Supporter - Gold Member ($25)
Joined
Feb 21, 2017
Messages
33
Likes
24
#17
I'm sure you looked in the tool box, but yes Matt will definitely make it right.
 

AndrewH

Swarf
Registered
Joined
Nov 25, 2017
Messages
15
Likes
4
#18
I'm sure you looked in the tool box, but yes Matt will definitely make it right.
Definitely did, I thought I had set them somewhere and couldn’t find them, fortunately I didn’t and they confirmed that they didn’t make it on the skid. All is well, they’re on the way to me now.
 

Larry42

Registered
Registered
Joined
Jun 22, 2016
Messages
43
Likes
24
#19
By now you have mastered the little mill. Give us your impressions.
I've been buying some used tooling and sharpening it on a Shars universal end mill cutter grinder. It's a pain to get setup but once there it doesn't take long to sharpen a 3/4" 4 flute end mill. I only use the CBN or diamond wheels. Don't want the grit from AO all over the shop. It also works well on lathe tooling.
 
[6]
[5] [7]
Top