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New G4003G Owner, have questions......

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CharlyArmy

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Just ordered the G4003G today and plan to pick it up at the showroom. I ordered the taper attachment to go with it. I just have a couple questions about the lathe.

Is the machine already filled with oil or do I need to purchase and fill the headstock?

What type of way oil are you using?

Basically what else do I need to purchase for the machine to get it up and running. I'm not talking about the machinist level or floor bolts or electrical hook ups. I have all the tooling and inserts I need (I'm a tool and Die Maker)

What isn't included with the machine that you found that you needed to start making chips?
 

drs23

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Just ordered the G4003G today and plan to pick it up at the showroom. I ordered the taper attachment to go with it. I just have a couple questions about the lathe.

Is the machine already filled with oil or do I need to purchase and fill the headstock?

What type of way oil are you using?

Basically what else do I need to purchase for the machine to get it up and running. I'm not talking about the machinist level or floor bolts or electrical hook ups. I have all the tooling and inserts I need (I'm a tool and Die Maker)

What isn't included with the machine that you found that you needed to start making chips?
I think all of your questions will be answered here.

RE the oil. No it does not come with it. A word of caution though. Be prepared to thoroughly clean the headstock. Myself, along with other new owners, have found them to have a considerable amount of machining swarf left over by the factory. I spent almost an hour with my telescoping magnet, varsol and a 3/8" hose duct taped to my shop vac to get it clean. Same after the initial run-in but not nearly as bad as when it was opened up for the first time.

Hope this was of some help.

Dale
 

CharlyArmy

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I already downloaded the owners manual and have been going thru it.
 

raross61

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I already downloaded the owners manual and have been going thru it.
Charly,

Here are some things that might help you I have had mine for 2 or so years now. Here are the things other people told me and I came up with on my own. The machine needed quite a bit of cleaning both on the inside and out! Be careful when you clean the outside painted surfaces, the paint was pretty fresh on mine, and will come off if you are not really careful! I put a 3/8" 45 deg, pipe nipple on the headstock gearbox drain right out of the gate! When you get it you will see what I mean, it is hard to get a funnel under there while draining! I have a HF suction tank and I used that last time to drain it and vacuum particles out of the gear case. I am using AW 68 hydraulic oil in both my headstock, and apron with good luck. Some guys are running AW 100 in the headstock, and AW 68 in the apron, in Oregon the temperatures are pretty mild here 9 month's out of the year. I also added a large, about 3" round magnet to the RH lower corner of the headstock gearcase. I think one off the HF welding magnet, or there cheap SS parts tray. I also used epoxy to glue a small magnet, from a pin type screwdriver, to the appron drain plug.

You can see on here some people are posting about the power punch moly gearbox additive, I would not use it on the first (Clean Out) run in, but I did use it on the Headstock oil change I just did this Saturday, used about 8oz, or 1/2 the 16 oz bottle. Really made those straight cut gears run smooth, and quite! When they send you the square tee wrench if they do, it fits nothing on the these newer g4003g machines, unless they have changed the book it will still show a square bolt on the carriage lock and your will be a allen, I changed that on mine by taking a rod coupler and cutting it in half, that way I could use a 13mm wrench that stays on my carriage lock bolt, way handier than hunting for the allen wrench all the time. I installed a hour meter right after break in, thought it was a good idea. Be careful with the GIT type ball oilers the plastic bottle that came with the machine would not work! I would say only use a point oiler with a Brass end on it, I had the ball pop out of one under warranty, so Griz sent me another one, but I think they are brass and forcing a steel nozzle point in there enlarged the hole and that’s why it popped out!


Bob in Oregon
 

raross61

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Sorry missed a couple of things, when you install the chip pan between the lathe and the bases I suggest you used some sealer to prevent oil, or coolant seeping! I did this, because this will probably be the only time you can, unless something major happens, and you were to take it off the bases for some reason!

I think it was on my facing plate, the D1-5 camlocks, were not tapped deep enough! Sounds simple enough, but the tap is a very,very,very fine metric, so first looked at the home shop, then at work, with 3 lista bins full of taps! No luck ordered it from Hall Tool here in Portland, then after I used It put it in the lathe toolbox with the lathe so I had it!

One more thing I haven't heard anybody else tell me this but just so you know, my machine was on order for 3 months, so when it got here we couldn't wait to get it running and play, we did the break in in all gears forward and reverse straight thru, not sure that was a great idea because in the end the electric motor was puffing some smoke out of it! We took pictures, and Kudos to Griz they sent us a new motor right away, the next morning we ran the motor and it was still running but I did not trust it, may have been just a bad motor or? I think now I might take a break when first running the machine in! Just my 2 cents. Bob

lathe 018.jpg 4l80 001.jpg DSCF0017.JPG lathe 008.jpg
 

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One more mod I did right out of the gate was to hole saw a hole in the side of the change gear cover, I wanted to be able to lube these gears without the hastle of taking the whole side cover off! I then took a knob (Reid Supply great place for knobs and belts), and attached it to a electrical conduit KO plug, you know the kind of plug, when you knock the wrong KO out, and need to cover it for the electrical inspector! I am using the dry teflon lube, and do not see any wear after 268 hours, you do have to be a little careful here, because the motor drive belts run in this same cover, so you don't want too much lube throwing out on the belts! When I replace the belts, I am going to make a sheet metal divider piece on my brake, so any lube will not be able to get over on the belts!! Bob in Oregon

Picture 002.jpg Picture 001.jpg
 

CharlyArmy

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I'm liking these replys. Lot's of qreat answers and info from you guys. Thanks a lot for all your assistance.

If you think of anything else, please respond.

Thanks again guys

Charles
 

raross61

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I'm liking these replys. Lot's of qreat answers and info from you guys. Thanks a lot for all your assistance.

If you think of anything else, please respond.

Thanks again guys

Charles
Charles,

I was just wondering did they have the taper attachment in stock? When I bought mine they did not have that attachment to buy, they cam out with it about 8 month's after I recieved my lathe. Every time I look on the website it is back ordered! I am ver interested when you get yours what you think of it, I am torn between building my own setup or spending the big $$ for the Grizzly OEM setup?

Take Care Bob in Oregon
 

CharlyArmy

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Yes, I ordered the taper attachment, but it won't be in until late August.

I went to the Springfield, MO showroom to pick up my lathe today. Great experience and the warehouse forklift operator really knows his stuff, loaded me up quick and exactly the way I wanted.

If the wife hadn't been with me, I would have looked around the showroom some more. Got home and all the oils and the level I ordered were sitting in the garage waiting for me. (My UPS Driver is pretty cool)

Saturday is unloading and cleanup day.
 

raross61

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Yes, I ordered the taper attachment, but it won't be in until late August.

I went to the Springfield, MO showroom to pick up my lathe today. Great experience and the warehouse forklift operator really knows his stuff, loaded me up quick and exactly the way I wanted.

If the wife hadn't been with me, I would have looked around the showroom some more. Got home and all the oils and the level I ordered were sitting in the garage waiting for me. (My UPS Driver is pretty cool)

Saturday is unloading and cleanup day.
Thanks for letting me know on the taper attachment! Glad you got your lathe, I remember when I first got mine, for the price these lathes are great! Again like I said in another post be CAREFUL around the paint, when doing the clean up! Mine was real fresh, and I took a little off, on the tread shift levers in front! I was using petrolem based cleaner, I see in the manual Grizzly lists the orenge based cleaner, probably close to like ZEP ID Orange?

Enjoy Bob in Oregon

One more thing, I was wondering if anyone has found a good touch up paint for these machines? I am almost completely color blind, so it's hard for me to match colors! Its a real pain, The op manual lists epoxy paint, on these for paint, My GF says the krylon almond matches pretty good, but who would I be to tell if it does! If it does match, I was kind of running it thru my head, if the appliance, almond epoxy might also be close, you also can get that, it in the small brush type touch up bottles? Thanks
 

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Thanks for letting me know on the taper attachment! Glad you got your lathe, I remember when I first got mine, for the price these lathes are great! Again like I said in another post be CAREFUL around the paint, when doing the clean up! Mine was real fresh, and I took a little off, on the tread shift levers in front! I was using petrolem based cleaner, I see in the manual Grizzly lists the orenge based cleaner, probably close to like ZEP ID Orange?

Enjoy Bob in Oregon

One more thing, I was wondering if anyone has found a good touch up paint for these machines? I am almost completely color blind, so it's hard for me to match colors! Its a real pain, The op manual lists epoxy paint, on these for paint, My GF says the krylon almond matches pretty good, but who would I be to tell if it does! If it does match, I was kind of running it thru my head, if the appliance, almond epoxy might also be close, you also can get that, it in the small brush type touch up bottles? Thanks
Bob,

I had some paint that came off during set up and cleaning as well. Someone (can't remember who) advised that Grizzly will send OEM paint if requested. I did so and had the green in two days. The almond/beige is on backorder but will ship when it comes in stock. Oh, and no charge for the paint or shipping. Fantastic service after the sale!

I couldn't be more pleased with their customer service. I wish all companies were like that.
 

george wilson

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With the time it takes to ship these machines over here,I can see no reason why the paint should still be so tender it comes off ! Something not right there. I bought 2 Taiwan made Grizzly 16x40" lathes in 1986 and did not have some of these issues that I keep seeing pop up in posts about new Grizzly lathes.
 

raross61

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With the time it takes to ship these machines over here,I can see no reason why the paint should still be so tender it comes off ! Something not right there. I bought 2 Taiwan made Grizzly 16x40" lathes in 1986 and did not have some of these issues that I keep seeing pop up in posts about new Grizzly lathes.
George,

Yes I thought the same thing, by the time it gets here from the boat ride, it should be cured! I have also noticed the same thing on some of the HF stuff! When you open the box it has a heavy paint smell, and finger nail will dig into the paint, also noticed like on my HF engine stand after a year, the paint has that dull chalk type look, not very inherent of "Epoxy Paint". Bob in Oregon
 

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It's garbage paint... The quality of paint is another option you pay for when you contract to have machines built. If you just specify a pantone shade number, they will use whatever paint they can get their hands on as long as it matches the color. Some of the better importers will specify exactly what paint to use and even setup the supply chain to make sure all components are coming from the importers preferred supplier.

I had to do this for medical device equipment (in this case, they were just simple plastic covers and housings for electronic oral and rectal thermometers). They were produced 1/4 million quantity at a time. My company had all components of our choice drop-shipped to the assembler in China. Our suppliers sent directly to my company any change notifications if raw materials changed and we would instruct the factory (after we tested the changed components) that they were allowed to use the different components when they arrived.

It's all about what you arrange and pay for at the factory. If you want it and are willing to pay for it, you'll get it. Otherwise, you'll get none more -and possibly less on any component that is not exactly specified.

EDIT: In my example, I'm not saying this is exactly how all shop equipment is built but, it's an example of how you arrange to do manufacturing in China in-general... Everything is negotiable.

Ray


George,

Yes I thought the same thing, by the time it gets here from the boat ride, it should be cured! I have also noticed the same thing on some of the HF stuff! When you open the box it has a heavy paint smell, and finger nail will dig into the paint, also noticed like on my HF engine stand after a year, the paint has that dull chalk type look, not very inherent of "Epoxy Paint". Bob in Oregon
 

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Bob,

I had some paint that came off during set up and cleaning as well. Someone (can't remember who) advised that Grizzly will send OEM paint if requested. I did so and had the green in two days. The almond/beige is on backorder but will ship when it comes in stock. Oh, and no charge for the paint or shipping. Fantastic service after the sale!

I couldn't be more pleased with their customer service. I wish all companies were like that.

Thanks for that advise, and yes I have to say, Grizzly has been very helpful whenever I have a problem. I did e-mail them Friday, asking them about getting a regular electrical schematic, and not the block diagram, or pictures, that are in the book. They said they did not have one, when I removed my electrical cover plate there was a sticker inside the door, with a regular electrical schematic on it, I took a jpg picture of it and converted it to a PDF for "future use" should I ever need it! I also just wanted to make sure everyone knows this, even with the lathe turned OFF the Power Transformer inside the lathe, it creates the 24 VAC for the work lamp, and the 110 VAC for the control power for the relays, from the 220 VAC, is always ON. That is why your work lamp will always operate, no matter what position the control panel is it! When I put my mill and lathe in, I came out of my wall with the power and went right to a fused handle type disconnect switch. That way when I am done with my machines I can turn the disconnect off, and even lock it should I need to! the transformer in the control panel is NOT drawing much power just being connected to the line, but it is still making a little heat, I know some of these electrical components are not "military spec" or anything so I figured why have it powered if I don't need to. You do not have to have this disconnect to meet code here, but its a nice way to kill or lock the power off. And pulling the plug on the cord out of the wall every time is a pain! Also I have a 18 month old grandson, named Dexter and he is all over out here some times, and I have seen him eyeing the thing so a lock in the future will probably be in order!

Bob in Oregon


 


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raross61

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#16
It's garbage paint... The quality of paint is another option you pay for when you contract to have machines built. If you just specify a pantone shade number, they will use whatever paint they can get their hands on as long as it matches the color. Some of the better importers will specify exactly what paint to use and even setup the supply chain to make sure all components are coming from the importers preferred supplier.

I had to do this for medical device equipment (in this case, they were just simple plastic covers and housings for electronic oral and rectal thermometers). They were produced 1/4 million quantity at a time. My company had all components of our choice drop-shipped to the assembler in China. Our suppliers sent directly to my company any change notifications if raw materials changed and we would instruct the factory (after we tested the changed components) that they were allowed to use the different components when they arrived.

It's all about what you arrange and pay for at the factory. If you want it and are willing to pay for it, you'll get it. Otherwise, you'll get none more -and possibly less on any component that is not exactly specified.

EDIT: In my example, I'm not saying this is exactly how all shop equipment is built but, it's an example of how you arrange to do manufacturing in China in-general... Everything is negotiable.

Ray
Thanks for the information, I sure would be curious to see the factory, where they actually build these import machine’s like the lathe’s, mill’s, etc, at? I wonder how many they produce per year in a factory? I think the Shop Fox and the Grizzly have to be made at the same factory! The G4003G Grizzly, and the M1112 Shop Fox look very close to the same, a few minor differences. I also have seen a couple of lathes, that look like, they are very close to the, Precision Mathews, PM1236 that Matt sells. It would be interesting to see the level of tools, either hand or automated, they use to make these machines? Maybe we would not want to see the casting's being poured, and finished, there! Bob in Oregon
 

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How many per year... thousands. Automation?... things are semi-automated except for stuff like gears, leadscrews etc and those are not made at the factory. There are dedicated suppliers for stuff like that. The motors come from different suppliers -have no idea how automated that is.

All importers know who else's equipment are made in the same factory. You'd be surprised at how much "intermix" is going on. In many cases, the base chassis components are (or virtually so) the same. Maybe some holes are drilled in different places, some have higher requirements for grinding, heat treating, gears and gear-ratio options, spindle bore diameters and motor options... Also, there are a couple tiers of equpment such as hobbyist + light industrial and then there's professional industrial stuff. Similar "intermix" happens with the professional stuff but not as much.

It's highly inappropriate to name names and for the most part, a given importer does not know exactly what another importer is paying for but, when an importer looks at another's machine, they can tell exactly. -And BTW, this whole business of what I'm discussing is not some deep, dark secret... Any one of thousands of people in the US who have overseas manufacturing knows the score.

Finally, I would never, ever talk about the specifics of what "I think" other companies are paying for but rather, only talk about what I know about for one given manufacturer. And finally, I can't stress enough that what really matters is how much pre-delivery inspection the importer does before sending to their customer. When I did medical devices, depending on what it was, we did between 5% and 100% QC checks. The little black funnels for nasal and ear canal inspection -big deal... easy to make, low risk -only 5%. Neonatal heart monitor enclosures, darn right, 100% inspection before we shipped them.

I'll talk to Matt to see if I can share some pictures of his factories.

EDIT: In case it's not clear... yes Lathe from company A, could come from the same factory and be the same base model as from company B -but the two lathes might have totally different quality levels.


Ray



Thanks for the information, I sure would be curious to see the factory, where they actually build these import machine’s like the lathe’s, mill’s, etc, at? I wonder how many they produce per year in a factory? I think the Shop Fox and the Grizzly have to be made at the same factory! The G4003G Grizzly, and the M1112 Shop Fox look very close to the same, a few minor differences. I also have seen a couple of lathes, that look like, they are very close to the, Precision Mathews, PM1236 that Matt sells. It would be interesting to see the level of tools, either hand or automated, they use to make these machines? Maybe we would not want to see the casting's being poured, and finished, there! Bob in Oregon
 

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How many per year... thousands. Automation?... things are semi-automated except for stuff like gears, leadscrews etc and those are not made at the factory. There are dedicated suppliers for stuff like that. The motors come from different suppliers -have no idea how automated that is.

All importers know who else's equipment are made in the same factory. You'd be surprised at how much "intermix" is going on. In many cases, the base chassis components are (or virtually so) the same. Maybe some holes are drilled in different places, some have higher requirements for grinding, heat treating, gears and gear-ratio options, spindle bore diameters and motor options... Also, there are a couple tiers of equpment such as hobbyist + light industrial and then there's professional industrial stuff. Similar "intermix" happens with the professional stuff but not as much.

It's highly inappropriate to name names and for the most part, a given importer does not know exactly what another importer is paying for but, when an importer looks at another's machine, they can tell exactly. -And BTW, this whole business of what I'm discussing is not some deep, dark secret... Any one of thousands of people in the US who have overseas manufacturing knows the score.

Finally, I would never, ever talk about the specifics of what "I think" other companies are paying for but rather, only talk about what I know about for one given manufacturer. And finally, I can't stress enough that what really matters is how much pre-delivery inspection the importer does before sending to their customer. When I did medical devices, depending on what it was, we did between 5% and 100% QC checks. The little black funnels for nasal and ear canal inspection -big deal... easy to make, low risk -only 5%. Neonatal heart monitor enclosures, darn right, 100% inspection before we shipped them.

I'll talk to Matt to see if I can share some pictures of his factories.

EDIT: In case it's not clear... yes Lathe from company A, could come from the same factory and be the same base model as from company B -but the two lathes might have totally different quality levels.


Ray
Yes thanks for all that info, makes more since now, Just looking at the lathe sales picture, pretty much means O, if you haven't had the chance to inspect the machines, or get the imformation from someone who has the machine then!

Bob in Oregon
 

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That sums it up pretty well.

Track record says a lot too... "swings" in quality over the long term is meaningful. -And this does not apply to just machine equipment but to all manufactured products.

Ray



Yes thanks for all that info, makes more since now, Just looking at the lathe sales picture, pretty much means O, if you haven't had the chance to inspect the machines, or get the imformation from someone who has the machine then!

Bob in Oregon
 

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About electrical schematics: They CAN be totally BOGUS!!!! I had a mill drill probably made in Taiwan even,because I got it about 1980. The electrician wanted to run it on 220 for better performance(I hadn't noticed less performance on the 110 I'd been using for over 2 years),but I'm no electrician,so said o.k.. He went by the schematic and couldn't get the thing to work. There were 6 wires. He kept changing wiring,flicking the switch on and off to see if it was working. Half the time the mill ran backwards. Finally,he gave up. Somehow,in a moment of I still don't know what,I said to wire it thus and so,because it was the only combination he hadn't tried. He raised his eyebrows at me and wired it as I suggested. The mill ran properly!!! I still don't know how I'd kept track of all those changes!! I can only do simple wiring,like light switches,reversing motors,etc.. Anyway,the final solution had NOTHING to do with the wiring diagram.

I THINK those Chinese might just sometimes grab the closest wiring diagram and stick it in your machine. (I doubt most of them have any knowledge beyond the little task they do.) And THIS was in a TAIWAN made machine!! A good machine I never had any problems with other than the bogus diagram.

My advice to you is: LOOK AT THE ORIGINAL DIAGRAM before you alter it to change to another voltage. This way,you can at least put it back to what it was if needed. These lathes have much more complex diagrams than my mill drill did,so be extra careful.

I say most of them have little knowledge beyond their assigned task not without reason: There was a bench lathe posted somewhere,which had the rear foot put on sideways,so that the 2 mounting holes were in line with the bed of the lathe,instead of being front and back!! The foot pattern apparently was separate from the bed,and would still "fit" turned sideways. They sold it like that!
 

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About electrical schematics: They CAN be totally BOGUS!!!! I had a mill drill probably made in Taiwan even,because I got it about 1980. The electrician wanted to run it on 220 for better performance(I hadn't noticed less performance on the 110 I'd been using for over 2 years),but I'm no electrician,so said o.k.. He went by the schematic and couldn't get the thing to work. There were 6 wires. He kept changing wiring,flicking the switch on and off to see if it was working. Half the time the mill ran backwards. Finally,he gave up. Somehow,in a moment of I still don't know what,I said to wire it thus and so,because it was the only combination he hadn't tried. He raised his eyebrows at me and wired it as I suggested. The mill ran properly!!! I still don't know how I'd kept track of all those changes!! I can only do simple wiring,like light switches,reversing motors,etc.. Anyway,the final solution had NOTHING to do with the wiring diagram.

I THINK those Chinese might just sometimes grab the closest wiring diagram and stick it in your machine. (I doubt most of them have any knowledge beyond the little task they do.) And THIS was in a TAIWAN made machine!! A good machine I never had any problems with other than the bogus diagram.

My advice to you is: LOOK AT THE ORIGINAL DIAGRAM before you alter it to change to another voltage. This way,you can at least put it back to what it was if needed. These lathes have much more complex diagrams than my mill drill did,so be extra careful.

I say most of them have little knowledge beyond their assigned task not without reason: There was a bench lathe posted somewhere,which had the rear foot put on sideways,so that the 2 mounting holes were in line with the bed of the lathe,instead of being front and back!! The foot pattern apparently was separate from the bed,and would still "fit" turned sideways. They sold it like that!

George,
I agree I looked at the electric diagram closer, and I do see some discrepancies, The output from the transformer show’s 3 wires, and the control transformer I have has 4! Looks like the forward and reverse relays are correct, that’s all I looked at just skimming reading it! Thanks for the warning! This is the only schematic I have found, Grizzly says they have none, for this machine, the rest are pictures, and block diagrams!
Bob in Oregon
 

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#22
Got the lathe setup and leveled, did the break in, changed the oil and went thru and lubed everything today. I'll recheck the level tomorrow and than finish up the tailstock setup and run a test cut.
 

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Lathe has been awesome, I have done 3 barrels, made some little tools for my shop, and some work for a friend who is restoring a really old pickup (I'm not into the car thing so I didn't pay attention to anything about year and make)
Going to go thru the lathe tomorrow and check everything out and lube.
So far, I am very happy with this lathe, it does exactly what I need it to do. The wife unit is even coming up with ideas for things I need to make for her.:phew:
 

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Lathe has been awesome, I have done 3 barrels, made some little tools for my shop, and some work for a friend who is restoring a really old pickup (I'm not into the car thing so I didn't pay attention to anything about year and make)
Going to go thru the lathe tomorrow and check everything out and lube.
So far, I am very happy with this lathe, it does exactly what I need it to do. The wife unit is even coming up with ideas for things I need to make for her.:phew:
Glad you're happy with your new Grizzly. I guess it's natural for people to only report issues but I can tell you my G4003G was perfect right out of the crate with the exception that one camlok on my 4 jaw needed to be screwed in one more turn. The paint is fine and was very little swarf in the headstock. The only complaint I have is that the 2MT drill chuck I got with my lathe was junk so I bought a replacement. I'm blown away by the quality of the machine for the price.
 

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#25
Necroposting... Raross61, Bob, I was wondering if you still are utilizing that hole you made in the gear cover to lube the gears or have you tried something else? Also, did you ever make that belt cover idea you had so lube wouldn't get all over the belts? Thanks.
 

Mitch Alsup

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#26
Necroposting... Raross61, Bob, I was wondering if you still are utilizing that hole you made in the gear cover to lube the gears
Back geats, or Norton Gearbox gears? Spindle gears are inside the oil filled spindle box.
 

Splat

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#27
Mitch, sorry I meant the spindle gears, not the qcgb.
 

gman10259

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#28
About electrical schematics: They CAN be totally BOGUS!!!! I had a mill drill probably made in Taiwan even,because I got it about 1980. The electrician wanted to run it on 220 for better performance(I hadn't noticed less performance on the 110 I'd been using for over 2 years),but I'm no electrician,so said o.k.. He went by the schematic and couldn't get the thing to work. There were 6 wires. He kept changing wiring,flicking the switch on and off to see if it was working. Half the time the mill ran backwards. Finally,he gave up. Somehow,in a moment of I still don't know what,I said to wire it thus and so,because it was the only combination he hadn't tried. He raised his eyebrows at me and wired it as I suggested. The mill ran properly!!! I still don't know how I'd kept track of all those changes!! I can only do simple wiring,like light switches,reversing motors,etc.. Anyway,the final solution had NOTHING to do with the wiring diagram.

I THINK those Chinese might just sometimes grab the closest wiring diagram and stick it in your machine. (I doubt most of them have any knowledge beyond the little task they do.) And THIS was in a TAIWAN made machine!! A good machine I never had any problems with other than the bogus diagram.

My advice to you is: LOOK AT THE ORIGINAL DIAGRAM before you alter it to change to another voltage. This way,you can at least put it back to what it was if needed. These lathes have much more complex diagrams than my mill drill did,so be extra careful.

I say most of them have little knowledge beyond their assigned task not without reason: There was a bench lathe posted somewhere,which had the rear foot put on sideways,so that the 2 mounting holes were in line with the bed of the lathe,instead of being front and back!! The foot pattern apparently was separate from the bed,and would still "fit" turned sideways. They sold it like that!
Well George they have not changed much on their quality control for wiring diagrams over the last 38 yrs. Just bought a Jet Gear head Mill (Taiwan) that was wired for 120V and I wanted to wire it for 240V. The diagram in the manual showed hooking up the six wires one way the wiring diagram in the motor cover (Pecker Head) showed it wired a different way. Called Jet and they said wire it according to the motor cover diagram. WRONG!
The wiring diagram in the motor cover had one of the 240V legs just capped off not tied to any motor winding (It never would have worked).

So I wired it according to the manual and the motor runs fine.
 

Mitch Alsup

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#29
Mitch, sorry I meant the spindle gears, not the qcgb.
The back gears in my G4003G are lubed with a light coat of grease.
The spindle gears are in the oil filled box.
The Norton QC gears are lubed with a light coating of grease, the bearings are lubed with oil daily.
 
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