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New Mill user a few questions

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Joez71

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#1
Hi All, I am about to purchase my first milling machine :) At this stage I am looking at buying something like this:

https://www.machineryhouse.com.au/M126D


Obviously, I need some basic tooling to get started. Now my newbie questions :)

1. What size vice would suit this machine? 4/5/6 inch? Im guessing 5 inch

2. Generally, should parallels be the same/bigger or smaller than the vice? Should I make them (on the new mill) or buy them?

3. I have seen angled parallels being used on youtube, but I am having a hard time finding them on ebay etc... do they have a special name?

I am in Melbourne, Australia so we dont have the range of options here, if theres anyone in Melbourne on this forum I'd love to hear any suggestions you have re suppliers etc..


thanks
Joez71
 

Mitch Alsup

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#2
I have a 4" vise on my Grizzly 8*30 mill (G0730). It has served me well over the last year.
But if I had to do it all over again, I would get a 4" Kurt over a 5" or 6" chinese even if I paid a bit more for it.

My parallels are longer than my vise.
You should buy quality parallels which are precision ground and hardened.
By the time you have made 200-odd well machined parts, you will be in a position to machine your own set of parallels.
But not so much early in the game. Parallels really need to be parallel as measured with micrometers--and stay that way.

I think you are looking for an angle block set. There are the std 45º and 30º, and a set that enables you to construct basically any angle from 1º to 45º
Then there are SINE plates where you can accurately set any angle (like 14º32minutes16.7seconds).....
 

Eddyde

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#3
Looks like a nice machine!
I agree with Mitch, Buy parallels, to make them correctly you'll need a surface grinder and heat treating capabilities. And yes, buy a good quality vise, a crappy vise will drive you nuts, especially if you ar a beginner. A 5" vise would work well on the machine but it could probably take a 6" as well, It also depends on the size of work you'll be doing?
 

Joez71

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#5
Perfect thanks, everyone!

If I have any other questions should I add them here or start a new thread?
 

MikeInOr

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#6
I think the biggest problem you are going to run into is mills spin backwards down under so that is going to sevearly limit your tooling selection. ;)

If you post more questions in this thread they will be viewed and answered.

I have a 6" vise on my 8 x 30 mill and do not feel it is too big.
 

Joez71

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#7
I think the biggest problem you are going to run into is mills spin backwards down under so that is going to sevearly limit your tooling selection. ;)

If you post more questions in this thread they will be viewed and answered.

I have a 6" vise on my 8 x 30 mill and do not feel it is too big.

I was planning on working whilst standing on my head ;)
 

Tony Pisano

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#8
In our shop, most every vise had a step in the jaws or removeable jaws. We would make soft jaws out of aluminum bar stock. That way you can mill a step in the jaws and eliminate the need for parallels. If they get dinged up, a light cut with an endmill cleans them up. Once they get really bad, just make a new pair. I think most who have done enough machining have accidentally hit a vise jaw with an endmill or drill. Soft jaws ensure there is no permanent damage to the vise. The other good feature is you can drill a hole or pocket, mill a slot, or otherwise customize them to hold a special job or short production run, then put them on the shelf for the next time you need them.
 

westerner

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#9
I have an import (but not the cheapest one I found) 4" vise on my Millrite, and a decent set of import parallels, 1/8" thick, 6" long. So far, so good. I like the fact the parallels are longer than the vise is wide. It allows me to easily grab the parallel to check for proper work seating, removal to avoid drilling them:eek 2:.... etc. The vise has not allowed the work to slip yet. I will build some step jaws soon, tho.
 
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