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New To Me Compact 8 Cleanup Thread

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The Fishing Hobby

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#1
Here goes nothing! This will be my first lathe overhaul but I've been taking things apart and putting them back together since I was 5 (when I took my granddad's drill apart without permission :oops:). The lathe looks much worse than it actually is and it was the best thing I could find on a very limited budget. I paid $435 for it. This will be a nice temporary distraction from another project for a product I'm developing that has been consuming my thoughts every waking moment for the past several months. I need this lathe for machining some shafts for that product so that is how I got to this point. The lathe runs and cuts great but looks like it was pulled out of a scrap pile. The ways look flawless. Here are some pictures. I'm starting work on the chuck first and will move on with it piece by piece. Any tips are always wanted and welcomed! IMG_20181106_101124.jpg IMG_20181106_101145.jpg IMG_20181106_101203.jpg IMG_20181106_101219.jpg IMG_20181106_101240.jpg
 

MAKEITOUTOFWOOD

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#2
Awesome! She just needs a good cleaning and some attention. Good luck with it and enjoy.
 

The Fishing Hobby

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#4
Slight correction, I paid $425 for it
 

The Fishing Hobby

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#5
Ok, got the chuck off and apart. Ran it through a couple of cycles in my ultrasonic cleaner using a degreaser. Just a quick tip, if you use an ultrasonic cleaner, put your parts/cleaning solution in a separate container and use water in the ultrasonic cleaner tank itself. Makes cleanup a whole lot easier
I have it running through a few cleaning cycles again now using Evapo-Rust. More to come...

Chuck before:
IMG_20181106_101135.jpg

Chuck disassembled:
IMG_20181106_104938.jpg

Cleaning in degreaser: IMG_20181106_111710.jpg

Chuck parts after degreasing:
IMG_20181106_115956.jpg IMG_20181106_120004.jpg IMG_20181106_120010.jpg IMG_20181106_120018.jpg IMG_20181106_120025.jpg IMG_20181106_120030.jpg IMG_20181106_120040.jpg

Parts in Evapo-Rust:
IMG_20181106_120510.jpg
 

The Fishing Hobby

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#6
Any thoughts on rust prevention for the chuck after removing the rust? Wipe parts down with 30w non detergent?
 

The Fishing Hobby

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#7
First time using Evapo-Rust, won't be the last! Rust gone after 1 hour in heated ultrasonic cleaner
I set my oven to 170°F and rinsed everything off after the Evapo-Rust treatment then popped everything into the oven to dry. After everything was dry I coated everything in 30w non detergent oil just enough to dampen the surfaces and then wiped it all back off. I think that should keep surface rust away for a while.
Here are the finished parts:
IMG_20181106_145036.jpg

I'm happy with that, not going for a full on restoration here. Just trying to clean it up and make it look a little nicer.
 

mikey

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#8
Evaporust is some magic juice, that's for sure. The parts look good, in pics anyway.

I have a few comments/suggestions:
  • I use synthetic lubricants (Super Lube) on my chuck. They don't cake or harden with age and lubricate well.
  • I use a rag lightly coated with oil and wipe down every surface on every part before I assemble the chuck. Once assembled, you cannot reach these parts so now is the time. I found that if I failed to do this then some time down the road, something will rust. I live in Hawaii and rust is a real thing here.
  • You need grease on the pinion nose (the end of the pinion that goes into the hub), the pinion teeth and the back of the scroll. Do NOT grease the scroll itself; use oil only.
  • You do not need a ton of torque on any of the screws. Just bottom them out and give them a firm snugging, that's all they need. Emco chucks were made by Rohm and are precisely machined; they will stay secure without cranking down on the screws. Next time the chuck comes apart, it will come easy.
You are missing the tail stock ram locking lever and the split cotter that actually locks the ram. Was this left off or is it actually missing? The OEM split cotter is made from aluminum, by the way.

The lathe is filthy but is mostly all there. It will clean up nicely. Pics are your friend and I would take pics from every angle before disassembling anything. An Emco lathe can be fully assembled from just the parts breakdown alone; Emco drawings are very accurate and complete.

I assume you are familiar with electrolytic rust removal. It is a very good way to de-rust large pieces, including that bed. It removes rust and paint without touching the parent metal, thus saving a tremendous amount of work.
 

The Fishing Hobby

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#9
All the parts look good except the lead in on the scroll for the jaws. A little file work there should clean that up and I don't foresee it causing any issues. The chuck operated very smooth and precisely even in the condition it was in!
I use superlube oils and grease for old fishing reels that I collect/use so I have plenty of that!!! I am familiar with electrolysis. Believe it or not, the worst of the rust was on the chuck itself. Everything looks like it was kept oiled excessively
You can't touch the lathe without getting oil all over yourself.
It has one of the aluminum clamping sections for the lockdown mechanism for the quill. I will have to make the other one. The screw was broken that went to that part too but the handle is there. I'm pretty sure I can make those parts, they look fairly simple.
I'm going to document things here as I go in case it is helpful to someone else down the road.

Thanks for the tips! More to come
 

The Fishing Hobby

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#10
Got the chuck back together and it feels just as smooth as before but it requires less effort to turn and it looks much better. It is much nicer than my import chucks I use on my little 7x10 lathe.
I think that the stud spacing on the back of these is the same as my really old Harbor Freight 7x10 but the studs are larger in diameter. If that is the case, then that may be a possibility for some people looking for a chuck for a Compact 8. I will do some measurements on the studs and the mounting recess later and see what the differences are.

Here are some after pictures:
IMG_20181106_195538.jpg IMG_20181106_195701.jpg IMG_20181106_195724.jpg IMG_20181106_200017.jpg
 

mikey

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#11
According to my notes, the spindle nose is built to a DIN 55021 standard. This specifies a register taper of 7 degrees, 7 minutes, 30 seconds. If you use a non-Emco chuck, make sure it has this register in back. The studs might fit but the register may not.
 

TerryH

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#12
Nice looking lathe and nice buy. I'd seen it on Craig's List for a while. I have a saved search for lathes within 200 miles of me just in case one shows up that I can't live without. :grin: Looking forward to following along with your renovation.
 

The Fishing Hobby

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#13
I just check it against my 4" 4 jaw I use with my 7x10 and they are very different. Emco on left and the 7x10 on the right: IMG_20181106_204747.jpg
 

The Fishing Hobby

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#14
Nice looking lathe and nice buy. I'd seen it on Craig's List for a while. I have a saved search for lathes within 200 miles of me just in case one shows up that I can't live without. :grin: Looking forward to following along with your renovation.
Thanks Terry, glad to see a fellow Arkansan here :encourage:
I had seen it on there for a while too but couldn't tell much from the pictures. I'm glad I finally decided to go take a look at it. I knew once I felt how smoothly everything operated and how well it ran that it was going home with me! There is a nice little lathe under all the crud.
 

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#15
Got the tail stock done today...but I'm waiting on the paint to dry before I mess with it much more (don't want to move it around much trying to take a bunch of pictures while it is drying. I painted it in this stuff and used the recommended hardener with it: https://www.tractorsupply.com/tsc/p...plement-oil-base-enamel-cub-cadet-yellow-1-qt
Not the exact same yellow but close enough for me :D
I didn't remove the old paint. I cleaned up the loose stuff and removed rusty spots. I don't have a lot of extra time to do this project because I need to get back to what I needed the lathe for in the first place so I'm not shooting for perfection here...not even close. I figured since it was going to be dissasembled anyway to service everything that a quick & dirty paint job wouldn't slow me down too much. If I need to do touch ups every once in a while, that will be OK.
 
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The Fishing Hobby

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#17
I didn't paint it before I put it back together because I almost ditched the idea of painting it...had a change of heart after I had it put together so I just did a little masking and quick prep/paint.
 

The Fishing Hobby

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#18
I'm just getting started on the cleanup of the compound for the lathe and I knew it was going to be in worse shape than anything else on the lathe when I bought it. During the inspection I noticed that one of the corners was beaten off by a chuck I'm sure at some point. Still looked like I had plenty of surface area there so that should be OK. I also noticed two of the gib adjustment screws were going to be in need of replacing. What I didn't see was that the adjustment screws had pins under them that actually make contact with the gibs. One is missing and it didn't fall out when I was taking it apart so it was lost at some other point before I got it. I am including a picture of my manual with a pencil pointing at the missing pin. I can make a pin no problem. It is made of steel (magnet sticks to it). I also figured out that the tool holder stud had been replaced by a grade 8 bolt with the head shaved down for clearance reasons. It works fine and the factory roll pin contacts one of the flat sides of the hex head so it doesn't turn.
Cleaning up those parts now...
 

mikey

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#20
Yup, that pin is steel and has a point that fits into a hole in the gib. Simple to make and important to have.

The defect on the cross slide is not uncommon. Sad but hey, it happens.

You can either use what you have or make a new tool post; also simple to make.
 

The Fishing Hobby

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#21
Yup, that pin is steel and has a point that fits into a hole in the gib. Simple to make and important to have.

The defect on the cross slide is not uncommon. Sad but hey, it happens.

You can either use what you have or make a new tool post; also simple to make.
I was thinking of buying an OXA and making a bushing for a good fit on the smaller stud. What sort of tool post could I make without a mill?
 

mikey

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#22
I meant that a new tool post stud is easy to make if you needed one, and you would use your lathe for that. Once you buy the OXA qctp, you will see if it will work with the post you already have. If it won't then make one that will fit.

The original stud has a round bottom and a hole was drilled in the side of it and the edge of the cross slide so that a roll pin locked it in place and prevented any movement. The diameter of the stud was a light press fit in the hole in the cross slide and the pin just kept it from turning.
 

The Fishing Hobby

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#23
Well, I found a problem. The lead screw mount for the cross slide came apart and I didn't notice someone had tried to solder it together at some point and painted over it. I totally missed that when I looked it over. It worked fine but I saw this as I was taking it apart. 3 pieces and it show signs of cracking in other places as well. I'm sure this part is zamak. There was a smaller plate mount for the compund slide lead screw I noticed when I had it apart and it looked like Zamak as well but it is in great shape.
A used cross slide is crazy expensive on eBay ($250 + $25 shipping). Not sure what to do about this part right now. Any ideas on how to attempt to make one from aluminum? I don't have a mill. I haven't attempted to make a part like this before. It almost seems like it could be made in sections.
IMG_20181108_084816.jpg IMG_20181108_084826.jpg IMG_20181108_084903.jpg IMG_20181108_084916.jpg
 

The Fishing Hobby

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#24
Well, I've gotten a lot done but still have a ways to go. I haven't been taking as many pictures as I planned on because I'm in a hurry to get it done. At this point, I have the tailstock, cross slide, compound, apron and 3 jaw chuck all cleaned, rust removed and painted where they needed paint. That is most of the business end of things. I have moved on to the pulleys/motor/electrical area of the lathe today. I apologise for a lack of pictures, I will make sure to get some as I start putting things back together (hopefully next week).

This has been a great experience! I will know exactly how to do all of the needed adjustments and have developed a better understanding of this lathe and how everything relates to each other. This may even be better than just buying a new lathe in some ways. I will know everything there is to know about the parts and I've made mental notes of areas that I will want to be mindful of as I use it.
 

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#25
Got everything tore down completely today. The only parts that I'm not removing is the headstock from the bed and races that are in the headstock. Other than that it is completely disassembled. I took the bed/headstock and the base cabinet to the carwash and got the bulk of the grime removed that way. I know that is probably a big no-no, but guys...this thing was unbelievably filthy! I drove about 20 miles with the parts I cleaned at the carwash in the bed of my truck and that air dried everything nicely.
Now I need to paint the base cabinet and headstock, clean the motor up and gears/pulleys and other miscellaneous parts. Hopefully everything will start being put back together by mid-week next week.
 

The Fishing Hobby

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#26
BTW, somehow the bearings and races are in very good condition. I'm planning on reusing them. They may have been replaced at some point because they look like they haven't seen much use and the spindle was tight as a drum when it was installed, no play at all.

Any recommendations for lubrication of the various areas of the lathe (bearing grease, lead screws and other parts)? Anything that is easily overlooked when reassembling a lathe. This is my first time doing a teardown of a lathe and I think I have been pretty lucky so far because the lathe sure seems to be in much better shape than it looked. Most of it was just filth, functionality wise everything is looking really good so far!
 

mikey

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#27
Look at the manual. It has a lube chart with all the lube points and recommended lubricants.

Personally, I substitute Super Lube grease for all the grease points and use DTE 25 Hydraulic oil for oiling. I use Vactra2 for the ways.

Reassembly is just the reverse of the teardown, nothing to it. Pay attention to the parts breakdown in the manual to make sure it all goes back in the right order. The manual will tell you how to adjust what needs adjusting. When you get to the part where you need to adjust the gibs, give a shout out.

Don't worry, you can easily handle this. Again, do NOT force stuff. Emco machines their parts precisely and it should all go in easily; if it doesn't, its not the part that is the problem.
 

The Fishing Hobby

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#28
Thanks! The ways weren't "flawless" :rolleyes: after all, but they aren't wrecked either. They will be perfectly serviceable for the type of work I do. Dirt on the ways filled up some little dings here and there but nothing major and the cross slide and tail stock move over them without any issues. No raised metal around the dings so that is good.
 

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#29
Got the bed/headstock cleaned up and painted. Again on the paint, not going for perfection. Just wanted to make it look nicer than it was before. Here is a picture of the ways. You can see some of the little dings on the ways. None have any raised metal around them so I assume they were smoothed over by someone already. Nothing major, just not a smooth as they looked when they were dirty. IMG_20181112_075928.jpg IMG_20181112_080011.jpg
 

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