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kd1yt

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I am the excited new owner of a pretty good condition Cincinatti Toolmaster 1-b milling machine, which I have just finished hauling home in sub-assemblies after taking it out of basement using sleds... The price was 'very right' but I earned it (with the help of a good friend) in other ways,

No collets, unless they turn up somewhere in the mix from whence it came, so that may be a puzzle to solve.

And along with re-assembly (and some cleaning and lubing while it is apart in sub-assemblies) I need to set up a rotary converter, as I have only single phase power available.

I do not have any heat in the shop (in Vermont) where it will live, so I would like to coat the sliding surfaces under the table, etc, with some form of good rust preventative to ward off condensation corrosion. Any suggestions? Would good-grade chainsaw bar & chain oil be a bad idea (I like the fact that it has a lot of 'cling' to it).

What is the best reasonably available and affordable oil to refill the various lube reservoirs on the machine with, for a unit that is going to operate in a wide range of temperatures?

Thanks! [photo is of the Toolmaster in its former home before the move]

Toolmaster 1-B.jpg
 
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GK1918

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Nice looking machine. Ok; I suppose bar & chain oil will work some do use it , if you can deal with the sticky mess to clean up. Myself I use chain oil spray by liquid wrench. Pro or con
it works for me on all machines. Then by habit usually Sundays I will use chrome polish on all my hand wheels. As far as the one shot lube system I have been using #20 non detergent
oil. Hydraulic oil will work, if it works with high precision hydraulic components it should be fine. I see you have a power X feed= #20 non detergent and the head. Don't overfill the
power feed gear box or it will be all over the floor. (they tend to weep out through the electric motor shaft). Collets?, I advise buying the most needed, 1/2 3/8 and maybe a MT3.
because they usually run $35 a pop on ebay. I use the MT3 collet for drill chuck and boring head. It should have the 3CH type (the big one) although not as popular some used
the type "A" they look like a mini 3C. If unsure let my know I have the collet dimentions cause I machine my own...
sam
 

kd1yt

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Thanks for all of the suggestions.

Would there be any big downsides to my getting a large (say 1.25) proper 3CH collet and then using that to "mount up" a more common straight shank collet chuck like an ER40?
 

Cal Haines

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For way oil, including the one-shot oiler, use Mobile Vactra #2. It's available from Enco, MSC, McMaster-Carr, etc.

I would not use motor oil in the gearbox. Motor oil is designed for very different service. A major problem with motor oil is that it is designed to be used with a filter. It has additives to keep moisture and debris suspended in the oil until the filter can remove the debris and the heat of the engine can drive off the moisture. You want debris to settle harmlessly to the bottom of the gearbox and water to float on top until it can evaporate. With motor oil, you're constantly recirculating the debris across your gears and bearings, causing unnecessary wear. Something like Mobile DTE Heavy Medium would probably be right for the gearbox. I don't know about the spindle; it might need a lighter oil.

Cal
 

Uglydog

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#5
It's to bad you have to deal with that old powerfeed.
However, I'll volunteer to relieve you of the burden!

There are Operator and Maintenance Manuals available free off the net.
I believe they provide some coaching on recommended oils.
Be careful about substitutes. Some oils have additives inappropriate to the mill.

Daryl
MN
 

kd1yt

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It's to bad you have to deal with that old powerfeed.
However, I'll volunteer to relieve you of the burden!

There are Operator and Maintenance Manuals available free off the net.
I believe they provide some coaching on recommended oils.
Be careful about substitutes. Some oils have additives inappropriate to the mill.

Daryl
MN
Thanks- to my good fortune, the operator and service/parts manuals were with the machine, but they are reprints of 1960s Cinci literature, and reference some specific Cinci-spec-number oils that don't shed much light on the actual parameters of the oil. Good point, above, though, about not using detergent motor oil.
 

Uglydog

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#7
I've had good luck with ENCO (I'm sure other suppliers would help) they pulled their charts and found modern equivalents.

Daryl
MN


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

Cal Haines

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It's not about detergent vs. non-detergent oil. The term "detergent", when used for oil, has a very different meaning that it does for, say, laundry detergent. A "detergent" additive in an oil is an additive that reacts with combustion byproducts and form solids that can be removed a the filter. AFIK, all modern motor oils contain additives to suspend debris and are intended to work with a filter.

Call the Exxon/Mobile lubrication hotline and talk to one of the techs. They can take whatever oil specs you have and tell you what the best replacement product is. In most cases, the oils that existed at the time the mill was built have been replaced by something better.

Cal
 

Chipper5783

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#9
Re: New Toolmaster owner - machine dissassembly !!!

Wow, taking the machine apart must have been a fair project. I have the recent post of the 1D machine, so looking at it - the head would come off okay (still a good sized lump of metal), the ram at the slew joint not much of an issue (also a good sized lump of metal), probably the table not too much of a problem (again, not light) - but the remaining "lump of metal" is still heavy! Do you have pictures of the machine when it was broken down?
 

kd1yt

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Re: New Toolmaster owner - machine dissassembly !!!

Wow, taking the machine apart must have been a fair project. I have the recent post of the 1D machine, so looking at it - the head would come off okay (still a good sized lump of metal), the ram at the slew joint not much of an issue (also a good sized lump of metal), probably the table not too much of a problem (again, not light) - but the remaining "lump of metal" is still heavy! Do you have pictures of the machine when it was broken down?
My friend who helped me and I were so focused on pulling off the disassembly and move that we did not think to take pictures of the adventure. I used an ice-fishing-type polyethylene sled to move the head and arm, and then, for the biggest parts (table, hip, and base) I took a big 40X48 inch plastic pallet and made a set of six 2x6x8 "sled runners," (vertical, so as to minimize actual surface dragging on the ground, but still spread the load over a wide overall area) cleated underneath the pallet (beveled on both ends so that the sled could move both forward and back. Used a large engine hoist to support and maneuver the sub-assemblies to be able to do it slowly with no injury to man or machine. Used various ropes and pulleys and come-alongs and the hitch on my truck to maneuver it out of the cellar and then up the hill to where I could load most of it into my truck and load the base (bolted to the pallet sled with allthread) onto my utility trailer.

Right now all of the sub-assemblies are sprawled out across the floor of a large portion of my barn/shop. Have to catch up on some other responsibilities so it may be a while before it's all back together, and I want to clean out the chips and goo and minor corrosion crud from all of the ways before I re-assemble.

When I first learned of this opportunity to acquire this on very generous terms, I was walking on air. When I was contemplating how to move it, I was at times overwhelmed and had no small amount of dread that either the machine or I would be damaged in getting it out of its awkward location. The actual "doing" wasn't that bad (largely due to great teamwork with the friend who helped (and who looks forward to having it running and will have lifetime privileges to use it))
 

Chipper5783

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Re: New Toolmaster owner - machine dissassembly !!!

Right now all of the sub-assemblies are sprawled out across the floor of a large portion of my barn/shop. Have to catch up on some other responsibilities so it may be a while before it's all back together, and I want to clean out the chips and goo and minor corrosion crud from all of the ways before I re-assemble.
I hear you on it taking a while to get the Cinci cleaned up and ready to start making chips. It generally takes me a year to get a machine going (so long as there is nothing really wrong with it)! I have positioned the one I got close to the power hook up and started cleaning. I hope to not really take much apart (just cleaning and oiling) - time will tell.
 
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