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oldepole

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#1
I haven't started metal working yet but I would like to get into it.
My question is: What's an engine lathe and how is it different than other lathes?





Thank You
oldepole
 

Dave Paine

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#2
I think an engine lathe is the same as a typical metal lathe.

Other lathes are e.g., wood lathe which is very different design for very different purposes. Another type is a Rose engine lathe. This uses intricate gears for machining ornamental shapes.

If you want to machine metal, cut threads etc. a typical metal lathe is what you would purchase.
 

Bob Korves

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#3
It is a lathe with a 4, 6, or V8 engine running it. ;)

Here is Merrian-Webster's definition:
: a screw-cutting lathe equipped with a back-geared cone-driven headstock or with a headstock of the geared-head type
 

oldepole

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#4
I've been browsing CL just looking and pricing used metal lathes and I see engine lathes listed on occasion and have wondered what the difference was. I have a small wood lathe I use to make pens and I'd like to get in to refurbishing old iron hence my lurking about here.
 

oldepole

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#5
It is a lathe with a 4, 6, or V8 engine running it. ;)
MORE POWER!!

Here is Merrian-Webster's definition: [B said:
: [/B]a screw-cutting lathe equipped with a back-geared cone-driven headstock or with a headstock of the geared-head type
OK I know what a headstock is and a geared-head type I would take to mean driven by gears not rubber bands. I'm not sure about back-geared cone-driven though.
 

Dave Paine

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#6
A backgear is a method to slow down the lathe speed for e.g., screw cutting.

The motor pulley drives a special shaft, the backgear shaft which drives a large gear, the backgear on the spindle. The regular pulley are disconnected for this arrangement.

The backgear design on my Grizzly G9249 lathe allows me to use the normal pulleys. A picture to illustrate.

The backgear shaft is in the middle. It is disconnected for this picture. When backgear is engaged the middle shaft is rotated so the two gears mesh with the two gears seen on the spindle shaft. There is a pin not shown in the picture on the right most gear on the spindle. This pin is pulled.

The backgears then slow down the spindle speed.


Grizzly_new_belt_installed_3584.jpg
 

oldepole

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#7
Cool!
 

Moderatemixed

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#8
Someone will likely correct me but I think that an engine lathe is larger than most hobby, vocational lathes. I had a South Bend 14 inch (referring to the size of material that can be turned) engine lathe. It was enormous. I now have an Atlas 10”, fully restored and it is what I would call “screw cutting” or a light duty/hobby lathe. Back gears are simply like having 1st and 2nd in your cars transmission. If you want to go super slow, or have lots of power, use them. Typically you would just use the other speeds; always starting in 3rd or 4th“ so to speak. I hope this hasn’t confused you further. Good luck. Great hobby. Avoid buying cheap if you can; you’ll either end up buying twice, or frustrated. Cheers.


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
 

macardoso

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#10
I understood that an engine lathe continuously ran the drive motor, but only engaged the spindle by the closure of a clutch. This feature gets to be common on larger manual lathes, where the spindle motor also runs the oil pump and any hydraulics if needed. Then a smaller lathe like many of us would be used to with a lead screw would be called a "screw cutting" and a metal lathe without a leadscrew or gearbox, but included a tailstock turret would be referred to as a turret lathe.
 

Dave Paine

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#12
How on earth is yours so clean?! I spent weeks cleaning mine and it still doesn't shine like that :)
The cover on the headstock does a good job on the Grizzly to keep out debris. There was some grime when I got the lathe in 2014, looked like particles from the belts and oil. I did clean the area before I took this picture. The picture was after replacing the motor belt which required removing the motor driven pulley/shaft assembly. A good time to clean. In this case it was quick.

My Southbend Heavy 10 was a different story. This was the view inside the apron. I spent weeks cleaning the SB.

Southbend_Heavy_10_apron_sump_removed_debris_2897.jpg
 

jdedmon91

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#13
I haven't started metal working yet but I would like to get into it.
My question is: What's an engine lathe and how is it different than other lathes?





Thank You
oldepole
Simple answer there are the same. When I started in the shop in 1974 that is what the lathes was called. I’d always wondered who coined the term and why?




Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

macardoso

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#14
The cover on the headstock does a good job on the Grizzly to keep out debris. There was some grime when I got the lathe in 2014, looked like particles from the belts and oil. I did clean the area before I took this picture. The picture was after replacing the motor belt which required removing the motor driven pulley/shaft assembly. A good time to clean. In this case it was quick.
Whenever I grease my headstock, it flings the grease all over the inside giving it nice black bands.
 

benmychree

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#15
I use the term "engine lathe" when I am talking about one; the definitions posted in the Wikepedia reference above are excellent.
 

Dave Paine

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#16
Whenever I grease my headstock, it flings the grease all over the inside giving it nice black bands.
My earlier picture was taken in early Oct 2014 after replacing the motor pulley belt. I just took an updated picture. A little of the grime from belt particles and some grease but may not be as bad as your lathe.

G9249_headstock_inside_not_as_clean_9372.jpg

This is what it looked like with the motor pulley removed to change the belt. I had to drift out a shaft to get the lower pulley mount removed so I could replace the belt.

Grizzly_motor_pulley_removed_3578.jpg

While looking for the older pictures I came across this one. My lathe is manually operated, but even a simple lathe like mine can need debugging at times. :)

This was the day after replacing the motor pulley belt. I have no idea where this critter came from, but it was escorted outside.

Grizzly_needing_debugging_3593.jpg
 

oldepole

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#17
Someone will likely correct me but I think that an engine lathe is larger than most hobby, vocational lathes. I had a South Bend 14 inch (referring to the size of material that can be turned) engine lathe. It was enormous. I now have an Atlas 10”, fully restored and it is what I would call “screw cutting” or a light duty/hobby lathe. Back gears are simply like having 1st and 2nd in your cars transmission. If you want to go super slow, or have lots of power, use them. Typically you would just use the other speeds; always starting in 3rd or 4th“ so to speak. I hope this hasn’t confused you further. Good luck. Great hobby. Avoid buying cheap if you can; you’ll either end up buying twice, or frustrated. Cheers.


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
OK now I understand. Thanks!!
 
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