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Oil Lines on a Bridgeport

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turbotadd

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So I recently pulled the table and saddle off of my newly acquired bridgeport to straighten the chip guards and noticed that all of the oil lines were plugged. So I proceeded to take the entire oil system apart including removing the black nylon lines from the brass inserts in the saddle casting. I am now having one hell of a time trying to get the lines pushed back in. I've tried putting a little lead-in on the ends of the tubes, and also tried drilling a hole in the jaws of a pliers so I could grab the tubing and not overly distort it, but I still can't get the little guys in there. Are there any other tricks or am I missing something?
2013-07-02_22-15-07_589.jpg
Thanks,

Tadd

2013-07-02_22-15-07_589.jpg
 

Richard King

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So I recently pulled the table and saddle off of my newly acquired bridgeport to straighten the chip guards and noticed that all of the oil lines were plugged. So I proceeded to take the entire oil system apart including removing the black nylon lines from the brass inserts in the saddle casting. I am now having one hell of a time trying to get the lines pushed back in. I've tried putting a little lead-in on the ends of the tubes, and also tried drilling a hole in the jaws of a pliers so I could grab the tubing and not overly distort it, but I still can't get the little guys in there. Are there any other tricks or am I missing something?
View attachment 57252
Thanks,

Tadd

Those have a lead or pot metal tapered insert that act like a compression sleeve or farrel . I have some new ones someplace or you can buy them from High quality tool. I sometimes when I am in a hurry drill them a bit bigger and slide in the tube and tap down on the old one if that doesn't work, I dab a little fast setting epoxy on the tube when it is in the drilled hole. Being careful not to get the epoxy past the tube....I once taked to a Bridgeport Engineer at the IMTS show who said the metering units should be replaced once a year. So I would suggest you order some new ones if you haven't already. One of the reasons they plug up is using cheap poor quality oil or the litttle screen on the bottom of the pump has a hole in it or I've seen where people remove them. daa... Calm down and relax...don't blow a gasket.it must be the weather we are having 100 degree's THINK :cool2: Rich
 

turbotadd

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Drilling and epoxying it is then.
I just got the new metering units today, though they look a little bit different than the Bijur ones in that they don't have the male tapered feature on the inlet.
These appear to be the Trico variety, hopefully they'll work. I was having some luck forcing mineral spirits through my old ones, but I decided to throw all of them in a jar of acetone and shake for 1 min. After I pulled them out, I couldn't get any of them to flow at all. Evidently they don't like acetone.
2013-07-16_14-10-34_60.jpg

I got 7 #1's and 3 #0's as that is what was on the mill.

Tadd

2013-07-16_14-10-34_60.jpg
 

Richard King

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I used be a rep for Trico many moons ago and they worked but I would put a dab of Teflon paste on the treads be sure the arrow is going with the flow. I also take a 3/8" box wrench and cut a notch in the top as wide as the tube, to make a light duty hdy. wrench, to tighten them and to hold them when tightening the compression nut. Works slick next time you have to remove them too. When I am out on a job and no new ones I use mineral spirits or stoddard sovlent to clean them. I usually use the pump on the machine to clean them many have a ittle check valve and sping in them and a felt filter. I am not sure why they plugged up, . I have also taken an old one and drilled out the middle part and attach it to a air nozel to blow out the lines. Have fun...:) going to 1/2 moon the saddle? Rich
 

turbotadd

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I was just planning on slapping it back together until I have time and tools enough to re-scrape the whole thing. I never got around to making a hand flaker, although I think I have some ~1/4" thick carbide I was planning on using.
I'd probably have to practice for a couple hours just to get a decent half-moon.
 

Richard King

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Square cut it then, better then smooth ways. You know bump scraping in diagonal lines to make the checker board look. Then stone it. I would lend you my Biax 1/2 moon flaker, but the armature wore out and i have to replace it. Rich
 

turbotadd

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What blade should I use? Are you saying just one scraping cycle each direction with medium stroke to achieve the checkerboard? Should I do the same on the Gibs?
 

Richard King

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What blade should I use? Are you saying just one scraping cycle each direction with medium stroke to achieve the checkerboard? Should I do the same on the Gibs?

Yes....the checkerboard cut....Remember the 4 Rules of Scraping
1. Individual scrape marks...meaning a scrape an opening or no scrape, then a scrape. Moving sideways with a stroke of about 3/16" Long
2 Individual lines ...meaning .the line that you just scraped in and the next line is scraped so the scrape marks on each line do not touch. First line as stated in line 1. The next line (2, then 4, then 6..etc. is separated from the line in front of it by 3/16" inch.
This checkerboard scraping method not only looks nice it pulls (make it appear faster) out the bearing faster then any old pattern scraping.
3. The depth of each scrape mark should be .0002 min to .0005 deep. The depth of a square cut flaking should be the same as 1/2 moon flaking. From .001 to .002" deep.
Number 4 is new. Some of the old students only knew of the top 3, but I find the next one is as important then the other or more.
4. Hinge the part if your scraping it to a plate or pivot the straight edge on the part being scraped, to be sure it is not high in the middle. A slide that is high in the middle will rock when you change directions...visualize the bottom way of a rocking chair...When you blue up the part pivot so the hinge or pivot part on both sides is 30% in from the end. Some call this the Airy Points at 25%. I have always used 30% and have never had issues. Rich
 
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