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Ok.. So I am Playing Around

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USMCDOC

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#1
With this idea of a "grinding" tool for the lathe.. not sure how good of an idea it might be.. but i am taking a older Dremel "router" attachment and augmenting it to fit the cross slide on the lathe.. with this method, will be able to adjust it to the center of the bore.. by using the supports that came with the attachment for circular cuts.

Tell me what you think?

20170610_083139.jpg 20170610_214520.jpg 20170610_215015.jpg
 

Bob Korves

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#2
That should do fine for light work. If you want to do heavier work, use a pneumatic (or heavy duty electric) die grinder instead of the Dremel, on a heavier stand, or they can also be held in a toolholder for quicker on/off and quicker built in adjusting. I am lucky and have a Dumore tool post grinder, does the same job for a larger investment...
https://www.harborfreight.com/1-4-quarter-inch-45-cfm-air-die-grinder-92144.html the basic grinder
https://www.harborfreight.com/1-4-quarter-inch-inline-die-grinder-kit-53177.html the "professional" kit
Make sure you understand keeping the grit out of your lathe and other machines!
Just last week I ground a Grizzly 5C to 5MT collet spindle nose adapter. It was .0006" out as received from Grizzly, clocked it to .0005", ground it to .0002" runout. Next is the MT5 to MT3 sleeve that came with the lathe. It has .002" runout as it is now. The lathe spindle has .0001" runout. The lathe is still set up for tool post grinding...
 
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David S

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#3
Your idea will work fine. I did something similar so that it just pops into the QCTP.

Wizard mounted in QCTP.jpg

David
 

MozamPete

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#5
Your idea will work fine. I did something similar so that it just pops into the QCTP.

View attachment 235575

David
I've done similar but using the dremel flexible extension to keep the bit mounted at the tool post smaller - the actual dremel hangsout of the way somewhere.
 

USMCDOC

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#6
Well i am going to proceed with it.. i may add a support bar to the riser bars to be more stable.. i am flying by the seat of my pants right now on this.
That should do fine for light work. If you want to do heavier work, use a pneumatic (or heavy duty electric) die grinder instead of the Dremel, on a heavier stand, or they can also be held in a toolholder for quicker on/off and quicker built in adjusting. I am lucky and have a Dumore tool post grinder, does the same job for a larger investment...
https://www.harborfreight.com/1-4-quarter-inch-45-cfm-air-die-grinder-92144.html the basic grinder
https://www.harborfreight.com/1-4-quarter-inch-inline-die-grinder-kit-53177.html the "professional" kit
Make sure you understand keeping the grit out of your lathe and other machines!
Just last week I ground a Grizzly 5C to 5MT collet spindle nose adapter. It was .0006" out as received from Grizzly, clocked it to .0005", ground it to .0002" runout. Next is the MT5 to MT3 sleeve that came with the lathe. It has .002" runout as it is now. The lathe spindle has .0001" runout. The lathe is still set up for tool post grinding...
 
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Buffalo20

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#7
I know they sell tool post grinders and this is a very common practice, but maybe I'm extremely cautious, but I don't want any grinding grit, anywhere near my lathe. I cover the lathe, milling machines and other machine tools, with drop cloths, before I use any kind of grinder in the shop.
 

USMCDOC

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#8
i have a few old sheets for that!

I know they sell tool post grinders and this is a very common practice, but maybe I'm extremely cautious, but I don't want any grinding grit, anywhere near my lathe. I cover the lathe, milling machines and other machine tools, with drop cloths, before I use any kind of grinder in the shop.
 

Bob Korves

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#10
SAM_1678.JPG SAM_1679.JPG
Above is my die grinder and shop made tool shank for it. They came as part of a large tool lot purchase. The shank is 1" square, which does not fit anything I have, but my mill can fix that if and when I need to use it.

Below is my Dumore 44-011 tool post grinder. The MT5-MT3 sleeve that has excessive runout is mounted in the spindle. The grit guards are off the machine while I change the taper angle from a 5C nose in the previous job to the MT3. Visible below the belt is the sine bar and a parallel for setting the new taper (gage blocks not shown.)
SAM_1682.JPG
 

Bob Korves

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#11
I cover the lathe, milling machines and other machine tools, with drop cloths, before I use any kind of grinder in the shop.
Indeed, Jack. Grit will ruin machines. I do not use "cloth" for my drop cloths. Grit goes right through cloth. To cover the lathe ways and other parts I use wet newspaper.
 

Bob Korves

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#12
Well i am going to proceed with it.. i may add a support bar to the riser bars to be more stable.. i am flying by the seat of my pants right now on this.
Oh, yes, proceed! Show us the finished product and give us a report on how it works for you...
 

David S

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#13
Indeed, Jack. Grit will ruin machines. I do not use "cloth" for my drop cloths. Grit goes right through cloth. To cover the lathe ways and other parts I use wet newspaper.
Yes indeed and in my picture that I posted it is really staged, just to get a shot of the set up. The picture is actually a very fine polishing wheel for polishing pivots, but it is indeed slightly abrasive.

I always cover the ways with paper towel sprayed with wd-40. Sometimes I use plastic food wrap since it conforms more with moving of the carriage.

Thank you for emphasizing this.
David
 
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Buffalo20

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#14
Indeed, Jack. Grit will ruin machines. I do not use "cloth" for my drop cloths. Grit goes right through cloth. To cover the lathe ways and other parts I use wet newspaper.
I guess it would depend on what the newspaper was wet with...................
 

Bob Korves

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#15
I guess it would depend on what the newspaper was wet with...................
I have used mineral spirits, water, and WD40. All of those work. I quit using mineral spirits for fear of fire or explosion. WD40 is too expensive for that (tightwad). Kerosene would be about the same, but cheaper. Don't know if it is a fire hazard around sparks. Actually, water works pretty well, lay the papers down, get them arranged, and then spritz them with a spray bottle to keep them damp but not soggy. Still looking for the ideal protection that is also cheap.
 

mikey

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#16
I use plastic sheeting, the kind used for home construction. It covers almost the entire lathe except the parts that are actually turning/working and is held in place with magnets. I give it a light spray with WD-40 to make the chips stick. When I'm done, I take it out and spray all the chips off and let it dry in the sun before storing it for the next use. Cheap enough for the limited use it sees and it works well. I do admit that I use this mainly for cutting cast iron as I have not done any grinding on the lathe.
 

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#17
I was thinking that the rubber (type) of liner that they have in the plumbing section for shower installs would be perfect.
 

savarin

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#18
Indeed, Jack. Grit will ruin machines. I do not use "cloth" for my drop cloths. Grit goes right through cloth. To cover the lathe ways and other parts I use wet newspaper.
I never thought of wet news paper thankyou.
This will come in very handy when I start on grinding my slightly belled chuck jaws.
 

darkzero

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#19
I've been using 3M painter's film that is pretaped on one end. It's not always ideal but it works for me most of the time. Pull a desired length out of the dispenser & pull to cut off with the built in serrated blade. I stick the pretaped end to my backsplash. It unfolds where it is long enough to reach past my leadscrew & power feed rod. My apron leaks a bit so the spindle power switch rod is always a bit wet, the end of the film will stick to the rod. Figured out to do it that way after a time where the film wrapped around my power feed rod when it was running. :)

The dispenser/rolls are expensive but a few years back Home Depot & Osh were clearing out the dispensers w/ roll & refill refils for really cheap. I think they were being discontinued for that size but they're now available again. I bought everything I found at few locations when I was in the areas. I have enough to last me a pretty long time. One downside is I have to wipedown my backsplash to stick it on whenever it's filthy or oily.


Img_0426.jpg

Sorry for the blurry pic, only one I can find except I mostly have the black dispensers.
applsupp-cat-jpg.jpg
 

darkzero

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#20
USMCDOC, I have one of these brackets from ebay that screws onto the nose of a Dremel. I have no idea how well or bad it works, I purchased it when I had a mini lathe but I never used it. If you want it, it's yours for free, just PM me your mailing address.

Some people have had good results using Dremels for light duty grinding, many have not. Problem is a Dremel is a light duty tool, small bearings that are housed in plastic. So no matter what part of the Dremel you use to attach it, it will flex.

 

USMCDOC

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#21
You sir have a PM
USMCDOC, I have one of these brackets from ebay that screws onto the nose of a Dremel. I have no idea how well or bad it works, I purchased it when I had a mini lathe but I never used it. If you want it, it's yours for free, just PM me your mailing address.

Some people have had good results using Dremels for light duty grinding, many have not. Problem is a Dremel is a light duty tool, small bearings that are housed in plastic. So no matter what part of the Dremel you use to attach it, it will flex.

 

darkzero

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#22
You got it Doc, it's yours.

Here's another idea I slapped together a couple of months ago. Well not actually my idea but I had both the pencil die grinder & extra boring bar adapter laying around so why not. Just had to make the sleeve & I also milled down the ends of the boring bar holder so the speed knob would be easier to access.

I have 2 Dumore tool post grinders so not sure why I bothered to do this but maybe it will come in handy one day. Sure is a lot easier to set up. I have not tried this one yet either.


20170615_002833-800x580.jpg
 

USMCDOC

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#23
You got it Doc, it's yours.

Here's another idea I slapped together a couple of months ago. Well not actually my idea but I had both the pencil die grinder & extra boring bar adapter laying around so why not. Just had to make the sleeve & I also milled down the ends of the boring bar holder so the speed knob would be easier to access.

I have 2 Dumore tool post grinders so not sure why I bothered to do this but maybe it will come in handy one day. Sure is a lot easier to set up. I have not tried this one yet either.


View attachment 235601
Yeah.. if a Dremel had a long goose neck body to it! i guess one could use the flex shaft tool.. hmmm

And i just discovered that Dremel makes a 3D printer.. goes to show how much i have been keeping up with that!
 
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darkzero

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#24
Yeah.. if a Dremel had a long goose neck body to it! i guess one could use the flex shaft tool.. hmmm

And i just discovered that Dremel makes a 3D printer.. goes to show how much i have been keeping up with that!
The Proxxon Pro series rotary tool is better for this application as it has a metal nose. But Proxxon tools are not cheap.

Like Bob mentioned, an electric die grinder would be much better for a TP grinder, even the HF die grinder would do a much better job than any Dremel like rotary tool & it's very inexpensive. Biggest plus is you would move up to 1/4" shank bits rather than the flimsy 1/8".

The Dremel 3D printer, another one of those Dremel tools that are limited & will be discontinued soon if not already. Dremel tends to do this often, much like their other short lived & limited tools like their wood lathe, hot glue gun, scroll saw, etc. But at least they try, I guess.
 

USMCDOC

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#25
Yeah..i can see that! i am going to be working a lot with Delrin, so the Dremel will come in handy for that.. But yes, i can see that your right about stepping up.. even if is the HF model! Though you and i know that is should be HFM.. for Help Fix Me..
The Proxxon Pro series rotary tool is better for this application as it has a metal nose. But Proxxon tools are not cheap.

Like Bob mentioned, an electric die grinder would be much better for a TP grinder, even the HF die grinder would do a much better job than any Dremel like rotary tool & it's very inexpensive. Biggest plus is you would move up to 1/4" shank bits rather than the flimsy 1/8".

The Dremel 3D printer, another one of those Dremel tools that are limited & will be discontinued soon if not already. Dremel tends to do this often, much like their other short lived & limited tools like their wood lathe, hot glue gun, scroll saw, etc. But at least they try, I guess.
 

kd4gij

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#26
I have a Foredom flex tool that is 1" dia. and fits a boring bar holder just right.
 

USMCDOC

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#27
I tried to talk a fella out of a Demure this evening.. with mount for the tool holder.. didn't work.. at least.. not yet that is..
 

ddickey

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#28
I have used mineral spirits, water, and WD40. All of those work. I quit using mineral spirits for fear of fire or explosion. WD40 is too expensive for that (tightwad). Kerosene would be about the same, but cheaper. Don't know if it is a fire hazard around sparks. Actually, water works pretty well, lay the papers down, get them arranged, and then spritz them with a spray bottle to keep them damp but not soggy. Still looking for the ideal protection that is also cheap.
Windex, and it smells good too.
 

Bob Korves

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#29
Windex, and it smells good too.
I find that Windex makes metals rust. Well, at least the cheap wannabe Windex I use...
 

ddickey

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#30
Okay. No more Windex
 
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