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Old die filer

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Scruffy

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#1
. I was given this Illinois die filer several years ago. I have gathered some files for it but, it seems to be going to fast to be useful except for smashed fingers ect.
Has any one else ran into this?
Thanks ron
 

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ghostdncr

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#2
Of the few I've used, it seemed they all ran at a pretty good clip. Like shapers, I was just getting into the trade as they were on their way out.
 

Bob Korves

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#3
Nice old machines!
 

Silverbullet

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#4
There are ways to slow it down. I've been watching for one I can afford near me there great for hand fitting parts. Depending on the motor a simple reostat May work. The router speed reducers at HF sometimes work fine . The motor looks small enough it may work. What speed is the motor if it's 3600 rpm get a slower one or variable speed one.
 

ndnchf

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#5

Martin W

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#6
Hi Scruffy, I really like your shop. You have some great looking machines.
Cheers
Martin
 

Dredb

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#7
Motor should be 4 or 6 pole.
There should be a pair of hold downs with the machine. Trying to hold the workpiece by hand can be very painful.
Nice machine!
Dredb
 

Terry Werm

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#8
I just purchased a used die filer from a retired tool and die maker this past summer. It does not have an overarm, but it runs at a nice speed, right around 200 or 250 strokes per minute. It uses a small gear motor and a belt to drive the filer. It cuts on the down stroke like all filers should, but can still lift the part off of the table if too much pressure is applied against the file. I learned in a hurry how to keep my fingers in a safe place when using it! I have not yet decided if I will attempt to make an overarm for it, but there are times where it might be nice to have.
 

f350ca

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#9
I have one i built from a casting kit, runs faster than I'd like, the post made me think maybe a tread mill motor might work,

Greg
 

Dredb

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#10
I just purchased a used die filer from a retired tool and die maker this past summer. It does not have an overarm, but it runs at a nice speed, right around 200 or 250 strokes per minute. It uses a small gear motor and a belt to drive the filer. It cuts on the down stroke like all filers should, but can still lift the part off of the table if too much pressure is applied against the file. I learned in a hurry how to keep my fingers in a safe place when using it! I have not yet decided if I will attempt to make an overarm for it, but there are times where it might be nice to have.
Bigger machine but shows hold downs for work piece. There may be some benefit to make one of them L shaped for use with sheet material. The ones shown can easily run off the edge. Dredb.
002.JPG
 
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