[4]

Old fart going nuts over nuts and bolts

[3]
[10] Like what you see?
Click here to donate to this forum and upgrade your account!

TQA222

New Member
Registered
Joined
Oct 29, 2018
Messages
22
Likes
2
#1
At the moment I am looking at a purchase list which includes

British Association [BA]nuts bolts washers mostly cap head plus taps, dies and allen keys

Metric nuts bolts washers mostly cap head plus taps, dies and allen keys

Imperial UNF? nuts bolts washers mostly cap head plus taps, dies and allen keys

It seems crazy to buy all three. Should I concentrate on one if so which? Bear in mind that I live on a sailboat in the Eastern Caribbean. While I can get stuff from anywjere in the world getting it from the USA is usually cheaper and almost always faster.

Would 0-80 to 5-40 Thread plus 3/16th up UNF and UNC which I already have.do the job? Or am I missing something?
 

JimDawson

Global Moderator
Staff member
H-M Platinum Supporter ($50)
Joined
Feb 8, 2014
Messages
7,142
Likes
5,393
#2
It seems that buying the sizes that you would use most would make the most sense. Really depends on what you are building. Given that you are on a sailboat, it seems that SS fasteners would be a priority. I don't think that I have ever seen a 0-80 screw, let alone used one.

I have thousands of nuts & bolts in all sizes and types, but many times I have to run to the hardware store when working on a project because I don't have the ones I need. If your boat is less than about 30 meters, and you tried to stow everything you possibly could use, your boat would sink. :grin:
 
Last edited:

Jubil

H-M Supporter - Gold Member
H-M Supporter - Gold Member ($25)
Joined
Apr 13, 2016
Messages
31
Likes
9
#3
Metric fasteners are available in the US. I have never been outside US so I don't know the availability of imperial fasteners in other countries. Don't know anything about BA Something to think about.
Chuck
 

BROCKWOOD

H-M Supporter - Gold Member
H-M Supporter - Gold Member ($25)
Joined
May 26, 2017
Messages
387
Likes
242
#4
Why not let the equipment in your inventory dictate what you concentrate on? For my mill, that's 5/8 - 11. For my dividing heads, that's 10 - 32. So, whatever I add or do that involves those 2 devises will utilize those bolt sizes. Likewise, my lathe likes M8 - 1.25, so I use the same on the whatever I adapt to it. Keep it simple & keep it afloat.
 

tq60

Brass
Registered
Joined
Jan 11, 2014
Messages
660
Likes
390
#5
Why are you buying????

If list is a general stock list for emergency or hobby then look at what will be needed for both.

If you are planning on building specific projects then buy suggested fasteners for those in size and type.

Worked with a navy comm tech yeasts back and he discussed how things were repaired instead of replaced simply due to being middle of Ocean limits availability of materials.

So survey your craft for general sizes of hardware required to make repairs and buy those.

Companies like fastenal and Lawson have maintenance kits that have assortment of hardware for just this case as well.

Sent from my SAMSUNG-SM-G930A using Tapatalk
 

Mitch Alsup

Active Member
Registered
Joined
Nov 17, 2017
Messages
308
Likes
208
#6
At the moment I am looking at a purchase list which includes

<snip>

It seems crazy to buy all three. Should I concentrate on one if so which?
If you are making stuff for yourself, just pick a couple and let everything else go. You can pick metric, UNF, or UNC. Pick what is most easily available

I make telescopes (from 13" through 30"Newtonians) and I have settled on 4-40 and 1/4-20. About 2/3rds of the fasteners I use are 4-40 and the structural stuff is all 1/4-20. I include 2 allen wrenches and 1 nut driver on the telescopes. 1/4-20 is fine for the maximal structural loads there things encounter, and 4-40 is fine for all the parts that need to be attached. For fasteners into wood I use 1/4-20 brass threaded inserts with epoxy. But still one 2 sizes are necessary.

I could save 2-3 oz of weight by using 6 or more sizes, but the scopes are 20-200 pounds and it seem frivolous to save that little and cause so much consternation.

The radio controlled cars I used to race used 4-40 and 2.5mm for the 50-60 threaded fasteners on the cars, with one 1/4-20 nylon nut used to apply the right amount of tension to the differential (controlling the freewheeling slip.)
 

TQA222

New Member
Registered
Joined
Oct 29, 2018
Messages
22
Likes
2
#8
OK I am going to follow the KISS advice and stick to US stuff and miss out on the tiny stuff buying

1-64 set of 3 taps
2-56 set of 3 taps
3-48 set of 3 taps

I will buy cap head set screws in different lengths. plus washers and nuts
 

westerner

If you are gonna be stupid, ya gotta be TOUGH!
H-M Supporter - Gold Member ($25)
Joined
Mar 29, 2017
Messages
164
Likes
215
#9
you tried to stow everything you possibly could use, your boat would sink.
As all those above have said- you gotta decide what you will be working on, and work your supply around that. Since I am not on a sailboat, I keep ALOT of stuff on hand. Lucky me! It would surely sink a boat,if we loaded it all on to one!
 

Bi11Hudson

Artificer00
H-M Supporter - Gold Member ($25)
Joined
Feb 13, 2017
Messages
213
Likes
236
#10
While I do have a set (eBay) of small sizes of metric, most of my model work is on older models with Imperial (American) threads. Looking at your list, with 2-56 in the middle, I would have to say that a goodly portion of what you are working on/with would determine what you need. On my models, 2-56 is toward the large end of the spectrum. A lot of my stuff has 00 or 000 fasteners. As in 00-90 or 000-120... ... There is a 0000-160 available, but I don't use that size so don't have one. I do have the larger sizes, up to 1-1/2", to fit my machines. But the large sizes don't get used very often.

At issue here is the American versus Metric versus British threads. For older equipment, you may wish to keep some British sized taps and dies. But for more recent equipment, you would want to keep American or Metric. The British standard has 55 degree threads, the others 60 degree. The bottom line is to look at what you will be working with/on and base any call on that. I would tend toward Metric, but that final call would be your's.

In reality, I'm just babbling away to get my name in here. I have had small boats in the past. But all riverine craft, nothing off shore. Wishful thinking in my old age, I guess. Again, I would say whatever your boat is, keep those.
 

Thomcat316

Registered
Registered
Joined
Nov 11, 2018
Messages
6
Likes
2
#11
Where in the Eastern Caribbean are you, and what are you planning on doing with the assortment of fasteners and tools you will be purchasing?
 

TQA222

New Member
Registered
Joined
Oct 29, 2018
Messages
22
Likes
2
#12
Where in the Eastern Caribbean are you, and what are you planning on doing with the assortment of fasteners and tools you will be purchasing?
I am currently anchored off North west Guadeloupe but plan to be down in Grenada for January. 1-IMG_2496.JPG I go skiing for three weeks in the USA in Feb. and the current plan is to buy everything I need for my tiny workshop in the USA then organise the shipping from Miami to Grenada by sea. Hopefully I will be allowed to bring everything into Grenada as 'spares for yacht in transit'. Things like the mini lathe just are not available in Grenada nor are tiny cap head screws. Anything 5/32 and above is usually OK.

What will I be making well the list goes something like this a wobbler single. a flame licker [ I am aware that they are tough to get running ] a twin wobbler [ I MAY buy the Stuart kit but am not too happy with the problems associated with getting the frame casting held square enough to drill the crankshaft boss true. ] I may build one from scratch using a slab of brass as the frame. If that works I may try a steam boiler. After that a 3.2 cc IC engine from bar stock. This will be stretching the capabilities of the Mini Lathe but we can only try.
 

tcarrington

Making miscellaneous parts for years now
H-M Platinum Supporter ($50)
Joined
Dec 27, 2013
Messages
58
Likes
47
#13
I recently began modelling and had the same choice you are debating. Made a spreadsheet which illustrated that BA was not necessary, in my case. For me, the decision was how to be able to replace a BA call out with an acceptable substitute. Seems the SAE (or imperial) threads do quite well. I think due to their thread design and tolerance, they are a bit stronger, not that strength is a primary concern.

Be sure to get dies as well so you can at least repair a thread gone bad. I would advise you to get numbers 4, 5 and 6 as well. If you buy some some round or hex stock you can make a screw if necessary. Screws you make will generally be "tighter". And give you more satisfaction. For all this some good files will prove most useful.
 

Thomcat316

Registered
Registered
Joined
Nov 11, 2018
Messages
6
Likes
2
#14
If you are planning on being in the South Florida area please PM me for my email address. I'm in Fort Lauderdale, and may be able to help you out with sources locally for the screws, drills, taps, etc., as well as forwarders for anything you can't carry out under "spares".

I like the suggestion someone made about sticking to stainless, you'll be happy about that.

I might suggest you standardize on metric for simplicity's sake, as the taps and dies are readily available, and drill bits can be interpolated from letter/number sizes. If not, standardize on fractional (UNC/UNF) for easy availability across the board.

In the meantime, go around to all the repair shops down where you are and see if there's chunks of brass or bronze (or stainless, if you're brave) prop shafting, broken propellers (for the hubs), and damaged large nuts that could be used as machining stock. I remember there always being that sort of stuff laying about when I spent time in the Bahamas.
 
[6]
[5] [7]
Top