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taycat

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#1
picked up electrical cabinet cheap that i want to use as power distribution box for another project.
only prob i need bigger holes than are in it and need them neat so made tool below.
was also chance to lesson in screwcutting on lathe at model eng club i belong to.
made it for use in drill press as cabinet will fit over table.

it's threaded 1/2x20 adaptor came with set i bought so i can use full range of hole saws with it.
put bigger one on first then fit saw that fits hole and nicely aligned bigger hole.

oops1.jpg oops2.jpg

next time i go will do one that fits in hand drill
 

T Bredehoft

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#2
Hand drill's fine, but hard to hold as the hole saw cuts through, it's gonna want to twist, nasty.
 

atunguyd

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#3
So you think it would twist? A hole saw is actually that, a saw, it cuts very differently to a twist drill so I don't think it will grab like a drill does.

Sent from my GT-I9505 using Tapatalk
 

hman

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#4
Atunguyrd - When a hole saw is used in a hand-held drill, it's almost inevitable that one tooth will break through before the others. Holding things dead perpendicular to the work piece is difficult. After the first break-through, a saw tooth can then catch on the edge of the cut. When it does, it will immediately stop the hole saw from turning, and all the motor's torque will be translated to the handles, trying to twist the drill out of your hands. The more powerful a hand drill you have, the more dangerous it can be, especially if you're blithely running at high speed and not anticipating the break-through. And of course, the larger the hole saw is, the more leverage it has! Been there, done that.
 

JimDawson

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#5
So you think it would twist? A hole saw is actually that, a saw, it cuts very differently to a twist drill so I don't think it will grab like a drill does.

Sent from my GT-I9505 using Tapatalk

You haven't done this much have you. ;) Yeah, they grab....big time. :eek:
 

atunguyd

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#6
Agreed, but that tooth can only dig so far because there are another 40 or more teeth that have not broken through and are all engaged in the workpiece and will minimise how far that tooth can protruded through said workpiece. I am not saying it will not grab at all, but I seriously doubt it will grab anything like a twist drill does where the lips break through and then the part gets stuck in the flutes.

Sent from my GT-I9505 using Tapatalk
 

atunguyd

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#7
Jim I will admit that my experience with hole saws and hand drills is mainly limited to wood so I am speculating here. I will stand corrected if I am totally wrong

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mzayd3

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#8
If you allow the hole saw to cut through in one spot, then "walk"the tilted hole saw around the cut counter clockwise, you really limit the amount of grab.


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JimDawson

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#9
I have holesawed a lot of electrical cabinets. The bigger the holesaw the more prone to grabbing. Below 2 inch is not bad, but cut a 4 1/2 inch fan hole sometime. You haven't lived until you've had a 1/2 Milwaukee Hole-Shooter try to twist your arm off. I have actually twisted off a 1/2 inch saw arbor with a 4 1/2 inch saw.
 
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ARKnack

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#10
I like your idea. I would used some flat washers to shim the non-threaded part of the arbor. That way it won't get jammed into the the saws threads. Also mill our grind a couple flats for a wrench to help disassemble.
 

4GSR

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#11
Here's what I made for cutting fan holes with. Jim, I also used my Milwaukee 1/2" Hole Shooter to cut the holes. Talking about messing with my Aurtritius!
DSCN2795.JPG DSCN2799.JPG
 
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awander

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#13
The holesaw actually will twist your arm much more than a small drill bit, because of the extra leverage the large diameter of the holesaw affords.

Just try it if you don't believe me....
 

mzayd3

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#14
Why are you guys using such large holes saws in hole shooters? That's what right angle drills and knock outs are for...


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4GSR

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#15
Why are you guys using such large holes saws in hole shooters? That's what right angle drills and knock outs are for.......
Have you priced a 4-1/2" Greenlee knock out punch lately????

I have Greenlee knock out punches for all the pipe sizes 1/2" up to 2", can't afford and justify any larger than that.
 

gr8legs

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#16
slightly off-topic but the HF hydraulic knockout punch set is on sale for $90 and it works about the same as the green variety and well worth the price, especially if you add the 20% coupon. 5 sizes of pipe holes from 3/4" to 2" (I think). A big improvement over the screw/wrench variety.

Stu
 

mike837go

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#17
Nice job!

You guys are sooo right about what happens when a spinning tool grabs. I've still got a ding on my off hand from when a 1/2" hand drill caught (5/8" cut down shank twist drill) and slammed my hand into the nearest piece of structure. I stopped using the 1/2' hand drill after that. I has 3 months of dust on it already.

I learned my lesson! If it can't be done with a 1/4" hand drill, I figure out how to clamp it in the drill press!
 

hman

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#18
When I remember to do so, I'll ask myself which way things will move when (not "if") something jams or goes awry before I turn on the power. Hand placement, move something out of the way, one more clamp, etc. etc. It's a good safety practice, which I unfortunately don't always remember to do. Luckily, all my "skin souvenirs" have come from hand tools, not power tools.

It's kinda like Rule #3 of firearms safety - know what your target is and what's behind it.
 

Ebel440

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#19
My experience with 1/2 drills , hole saws and sheet metal never worked out very well. I stopped doing it and only use a 3/8 drill. If you replace the pilot drill with just a pilot after drilling the hole it works a little better.
 

Eddyde

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#20
Yup, Hole Saws grab big time and can cause serious injury if not used properly. For sheet metal, it helps to clamp pieces of scrap wood on both sides of the work and cut through the top piece of wood, remove the plug then cut through. Be sure the work is secure and you are braced against the force of rotation.
 

kvt

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#21
Never let your finger hit that little button that locks the trigger on. It can hurt until it spins enough to unplug or breaks the cord. Thought it was going to take my arm off but just broke a 2x4 instead. I'm real careful about using hole saws and large high powered drills now. Wife is like that looks like it would hurt, and I'm like yea.
 

chips&more

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#22
You haven't done this much have you. ;) Yeah, they grab....big time. :eek:
Yeah! Try a 6” hole saw mounted in a Milwaukee Hole Hawg. You just might wind up in the hospital. It will first probably give you a good merry go round ride and wrap the power cord all around you and your arms will have more joints in it than it did before. Maybe even get an electric shock from the cord, or more. Then you go to the hospital and have to tell all the staff there how it all happened :(…Dave.

PS: I just realized that someone reading this could go and try it. PLEASE DO NOT. It was only in jest. A Milwaulee Hole Hawg can produce torque that can tear your arms off. I own one, but after the first time it got away from me. I now give it all the respect it wants by letting it collect dust. And I would only use the 6” hole saw on something soft like, dry wall/sheet rock. Be Safe.
 
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kd4gij

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#23
:+1: I have an old all aluminum Milwaukee 1/2" drill If it grabs you are going for a ride. I had a friend that was 288# and layed block for a living. H was using it to drill a 3/4" hole in 1/2" steel plate. When it grabbed, it through him 4' across the yard. Needless to say he wouldn't touch that drill anymore.:laughing:. It was funny because the only thing it hurt was his pride.
 

John Hasler

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#24
:+1: I have an old all aluminum Milwaukee 1/2" drill If it grabs you are going for a ride. I had a friend that was 288# and layed block for a living. H was using it to drill a 3/4" hole in 1/2" steel plate. When it grabbed, it through him 4' across the yard. Needless to say he wouldn't touch that drill anymore.:laughing:. It was funny because the only thing it hurt was his pride.
I have an old Black & Decker like that. 1/2hp, 400rpm, no speed control. Pull the trigger and something *will* turn: the bit, the workpiece, you and the drill...
 

uncle harry

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#25
If you allow the hole saw to cut through in one spot, then "walk"the tilted hole saw around the cut counter clockwise, you really limit the amount of grab.


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+1 on this. I've had good success using that method. Also, I like to use a smooth rod as a pilot instead of the customary drill. A smooth pilot won't enlarge the center hole like a drill will.
 

mcostello

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#26
FIL has a 9/16" drill early Japanese, speed around 150 rpm. He was laying on the ground drilling upward through a truck bumper to attach an offset bumper hitch. Drill bit rotated Him around and jammed Him (around 14" handles) up against a tire. He could not move and took awhile to release His grip on the drill switch. So to even make it worse the dog thought He was having so much fun, the dog laid against Him so He could not move.:D
 

jpfabricator

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#27
Make the circle with a Sharpe and use a jigsaw with a fine tooth hacksaw blade made for jigsaws. Quicker, safer, and cheaper!

Sent from somewhere in east Texas!
 

extropic

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#28
FIL has a 9/16" drill early Japanese, speed around 150 rpm. He was laying on the ground drilling upward through a truck bumper to attach an offset bumper hitch. Drill bit rotated Him around and jammed Him (around 14" handles) up against a tire. He could not move and took awhile to release His grip on the drill switch. So to even make it worse the dog thought He was having so much fun, the dog laid against Him so He could not move.:D
LOL I'll bet there are youtube videos about that type of thing. If not yet, there will be.
 

mike837go

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#29
I have an old Black & Decker like that. 1/2hp, 400rpm, no speed control. Pull the trigger and something *will* turn: the bit, the workpiece, you and the drill...
I've got the Sears Craftsman labeled version sitting on a shelf, collecting dust just to keep us all safe.

To my knowledge, it has never severely injured anyone. But my dad and myself have gotten our wrists twisted by it.

The Bosch variable speed next to it, is only slightly less dangerous.
 

wawoodman

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#30
I used to install locks. 2-1/4 multi-tooth forstner + old Craftsman 1/2" single-speed drill motor / binding in drill guide = MAJOR torque.

(Picture Wile E. Coyote being spun around in reverse...)
 
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