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eac67gt

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  1. eac67gt - 03-08-13, 11:47 AM
    Painting is another one of those subjects I would like to kick around. I have sprayed more paint then I can remember and that probably is because I sprayed so much paint but did not wear a resporaitor. Years ago when I did the Mustang I would spray for hours than leave the building. As soon as I walked out the door you could instantly tell you inhaled way to much. I use to shot all lacquer based paints. Another thing is you never wore any hand protection to clean the equipment. Oh, the amount of acetone and lacquer thinner that more than likely soaked into my system. I wonder now if one day I won't get cancer from it. Many years of working in the old electronics industry also exposed me to a lot of other solvents. Combined they all had to do damage but time will tell. I am kind of getting off course here but in someways I am not because it is an issue. All these finishing processes we discuss even just creating metal dust can in time do damage. Always protect yourself. If you don't love yourself I imagine there is someone that does. This paragraph runs on and on because for some reason my RETURN button is not working. Got to figure that out. Ed​
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  2. xalky - 03-08-13, 12:07 PM
    Painting is definitely one of those subjects that should go in the group. I was restoring my 70 Nova SS back in the late 80s. I was in my early 20s then. I sprayed it with epoxy primer in my garage wearing a carbon respirator. Well, about 3-4 days later I wasn't feeling very well, so i go see my doctor and he sais to me have you been drinking a lot of alcohol lately. I said no, why? He sais, you look Jaundiced, skin yellow, whites of my eyes turning yellow. I don't remember exactly what he gave me, to clear up the jaundice, but it did clear up.

    The thing is, at the time i never put 2 and 2 together that the paint is what had gotten me sick. It took me about a month to figure out what had gotten me sick after learning that i was wearing the wrong respirator. I know that I've been exp[osed to a lot of toxic stuff, Things like tons of pressure treated lumber and solvents, lead from lead paint dust, asbestos and oodles of xylol aka paint reducer. I try not to think about it too much...we're all gonna die from something.:(
 
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xalky

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This is a test.
I'm trying to figure out why the posts in the metal finishing section keep showing up as "unread" posts even though they haven't been responded to and they've been read by me daily just to see why they're showing up as unread.
 

Tamper84

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Hmmm a lot to think of here. What about brush paint? Like techniques to have a good finish on a machine? And paint?

thanks,
Chris
 

eac67gt

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Hi Tamper84,

Not sure I understand what your question is? :confused:
 

Tamper84

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Hi Ed, sorry I was rushed to finish my question lol. But I was wondering how to go about proper preperation, and technique to recieve a good finish on old machines. Every time I have painted something that has bad oil on it( like my lathe) it seems the paint ends up peeling off some where. I know cast iron is porous and can hold oil in it. I just don't know how to go about proper prep for paint

Thanks,
Chris
 

eac67gt

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Typically I always used a product called Prep-solv. There are many ways to prep the surface to remove contaminates. The one big thing on large surfaces is that when you flush out oils they must be fully washed off or they will just move to another spot. Prep-solv or a pre paint cleaner should be used immediately before painting. The next thing is to follow up with a good primer. I recommend a good etching primer. It bonds to the metal better than typical primers. It has an etching solution in it that will, to make it sound easy, cut/scratch the metal chemically so that the actual primer adheres to the metal. On extremely oily - greasy things I first break the oil - grease down with WD40. Sounds crazy but great solvent for grease. Then I wipe it down with some basic mineral spirits. Next I wash it with Purple Power or some good degreaser. Most purely metal things don't be afraid to get wet. After cleaning dry good. Be it the air compressor, hair dryer or even leaf blower. Make sure to dry completely and immediately to minimize rust or oxidization. Then right before paint hit it with the prep-solv or even wipe it down with lacquer thinner, acetone or some other quick evaporating solvent. If a little rust does appear it is completely superficial and the etching primmer will bond to it. The one main thing in any metal is time. Do not allow parts to sit around after prepping without paint. The longer it sits the more chance of contamination, oxidization or rust. There is great brush on etching primers so you don't have to spray.
Most important part of any paint job is prep, prep, prep.
If a part is already de-greased or basically de-oiled the WD40 thing I do isn't needed of course.

I hope this isn't confusing it is the way my head works and things just seem to pour out. :nuts:


These products are not what I am suggesting you buy just ideas on such products. These I have not used but once again they are just examples.

Here is a prep-solv http://www.eastwood.com/ew-pre-painting-prep-aerosol-11oz.html?reltype=2&parent_id=435

Here is a etch primer http://www.eastwood.com/ew-self-etch-primer-quart-gray.html

Here is an etch primer I use a lot http://www.duplicolor.com/products/selfEtchingPrimer/

Here is prep products at Duplicolor http://www.duplicolor.com/products/greaseWaxRemover/

Here is the prep-solv I get at the auto body supply shop http://chemtools.com.au/index.php/welding-a-metal-treatment/aluminium-prep-a-treatment/375-prep-solv-metal-cleanerdegreaser


Again any paint job is all about prep, prep, prep. Paint adhering is all about how the metal or surface was prepped.
 

Zeke

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No need to expose yourself to chemicals, but sometimes I think safety has gone overboard. True, there are some chemicals found in today's paints that weren't around 40 years ago. Education is the key.
 
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Nelson

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I tried my best to fix this, had not made a backup in two days, and ended up crashing the database.

My bad for not making a more recent database, but I just wanted to silence everyone on this issue.

Arrrgh!
 

chevnova396

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Mill #2.jpgIMAG0444.jpgIMAG0441.jpgIMAG0440.jpgMill #1 completed -web sized.jpg

We just finished a Groriep Turret Mill w/ a 11 foot diameter table at our local water treatment plant.

1) We de greased mill w/ purple power. We used an airless sprayer to apply de greaser. This worked great as the pressure from the airless was great to remove the grease.
2) We then used tsp (again thru airless) to remove de greaser. Make sure to protect the ways and unpainted surfaces. The tsp will etch the metal if it is not protected.
3) We then used wire wheels on makitas to smooth out rough areas. We then applied 3 gallons of bondo. After it dried we started with 100 grit sandpaper on orbital sanders. Finished up with 150 grit.
4) We then re sprayed the tsp and wiped entire unit with laquer thinner.
5) We applied Pratt & Lambert HP universal primer (purchased @ www.paintplace.biz) This is a waterbased industrial primer w/ low voc's
6) We then applied Pratt & Lambert DTM (purchased @ www.paintplace.biz) This also is a waterbased Industrial direct to metal paint. It is very important to have the air, metal surface and paint above 60 degrees f. This product will not work in cold weather.

The clients were very happy with the finished product.

Ted
detailpaint.com

Mill #2.jpg IMAG0444.jpg IMAG0441.jpg IMAG0440.jpg Mill #1 completed -web sized.jpg
 
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