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Photos Of Old Workshop 100 Years Ago

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buffdan

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#2
fantastic.. Imagine being able to take a shop tour during the day..
Thanks for sharing
 

pdentrem

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#3
Look at all the guarding around the flying belts! Modern safety inspectors would have a heart attack.
Pierre
 

ogberi

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#4
You can almost smell the grease, cutting oil, and cigarette smoke. :)

Ballsy of those guys working that close to cast iron without much protection. Some big honkin' cores in those castings, too. Wonder if they were sodium silicate bonded or what method was used to bind them.
 

brino

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#5
Wow! Just Wow!

Thanks for sharing.
-brino
 

Ulma Doctor

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#6
great pictures of an era gone by.
thanks for the picture link!!!
 

Travis7s

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#7
It simply amazes me how they were able to engineer and build quality things back then. I can barely change a light bulb without consulting Google!
 

pdentrem

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#8
Here is a workshop back in approximately 1930. Williams Gold in Fort Erie Ontario. They were also the makers of Williams Warblers fishing lures. Note that the lineshafts are still in use but the belts have wooden covers at the machines. There is also some more pointed protection in place as well.
Pierre williams gold.jpg
 

taycat

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#9
great pics, cheers.
 

hdskip

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#10
I bet the guy supplying drive belts was a happy fellow!
 

thomas s

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#11
Great pictures thanks for posting.
 

ray

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#12
Guess OSHA wasn't even a dream back then. Amazing thinking of how things were made and with limited equipment back then.
 

psychodelicdan

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#13
I don't know. It looks like they had a lot of tooling on those shelves on the left in that one photo. I bet those belts made quite a ruckus.

Master of unfinished projects
 

DougD

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#14
Wow, great pictures......thanks for sharing

doug
 

core-oil

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#15
You can almost smell the grease, cutting oil, and cigarette smoke. :)

Ballsy of those guys working that close to cast iron without much protection. Some big honkin' cores in those castings, too. Wonder if they were sodium silicate bonded or what method was used to bind them.
Hi Ogberi
It is amazing the "advancements" we have made since those photographs were taken, In fact I think on the so called advancements made in the foundry trade in my time scale over the last 58 years And my take on the matter is I would rather be back in the foundries I worked in then, than the similar apologies for foundries of today
It is a horrifying thought these guys were casting metal with no eye protection, In my young day's we had safety goggles and asbestos gloves!, As regards the hot metal , We were careful but not afraid, The core sands used then for the big cores was usually a mixture of a natural rock sand some silica sand, and additional binding materials to hold the sand grains together during forming the cores and casting the metal into the moulds, where they had to withstand the wash of the molten metal
The supplementary binders were numerous, We used a clay /water wash, starch powder , & sometimes some dried horse manure! For the tiny cores we used oil binders, Usually a linseed oil base, When making small cores this was pleasant stuff to work with.
In those days there was a lot of skill involved, the old moulders were a happy go lucky bunch of guys, One just jogged along at a reasonable pace, Unlike today with its zero hours contracts, folks in charge who haven't a clue etc.. !
Well I guess I had then youth on my side + enthusiasm, & did not mind getting my face & hands grimy with the graphite powder, Would I do it all again or some other occupation?
 

DanBlack

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#16
Such an insight to the old ways of manufacturing
 

Round in circles

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#17
Thanks for taking me back into yester year (& some ).
I liked the heavy machine leveling ramps , that's not something I've seen for over 49 years when they were used to level & true up a big capstan lathe capable of turning a six foot internal diameter at The Ruston Bucryus Works of Lincoln England .
 
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#18
Absolutely amazing. I see some old Giddings and Lewis horizontal boring mills in a couple photos. I worked for them for almost 12 years. Some of those old machines are still running. I have worked on a couple. Some have been retrofitted with slightly newer technology.
 

bpratl

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#19
Great photos, thanks for sharing.
 

tomh

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#20
Wonder what the lever action rifle on the wall is for. :cautious:
 

pdentrem

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#21
Varmints, when they are far. Something for short range critters is on the left!
 

51cub

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#23
Amazing pictures! Thank you for sharing!
 

Half Nut

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#24
Great pics, thanks for posting them, Osha would have a field day if they were around back then.
 

planeflyer21

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#25
Great pics, thanks for posting them, Osha would have a field day if they were around back then.
No they wouldn't. They would see so many violations, they wouldn't know where to start and their heads would POP! :eek 2:
 

'Topcraft

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#26
Thats Awesome, I will be looking at those pic's for a long time
 

'Topcraft

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#27
I think that is a really good example of why OSHA was formed. I worked in a "modern foundry" back in the 80's and it was dangerous as hell. Looking at those photos I can't imagine how dangerous it was back then. Come to think about it, Appleton Electric Foundry wasn't all that modern at the time I was there. The building where my shop was located housed a brass foundry in the late 1800's. Not there anymore tho
 

Jcl

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#28
Those pictures are great! It appears that housekeeping was fairly low on the list in that factory. I began my training in a flat-belt machine shop. The joke was, "Those belts are hanging around looking to see who's for lunch." It didn't take long to learn to live with them, and I thought they were fun. I collected a good amount of line shafting, and I was going to set up a flat-belt shop in my barn with some of my older equipment. In time the idea faded, and I gave most of the shafting and hangers to a museum. Jcl
 

wrat

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#29
I will probably regret being such a killjoy, but a few of those pictures are obviously from a time newer than the title would indicate.
Still, very cool and always a twinge of nostalgia comes through. Even disc sanders got a belt to the ceiling. Amazing.

Wrat
 
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