Pin Gage Rust Prevention?

Kroll

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Guys when I pull out the pin gage after using them I would wipe that one down with Fluid Film which is a rust preventer and I use this on the lathe.But I don’t use Pin Gage but ever so often,well today I see couple of them is little rusty.So what Im using I guess is not long term,so wondering what others use?What do you wipe down your Pins with how do you prepare you Pins for storage.I got some money invested in these Pins just don’t want to see rust on them.Thanks guys for any direction
 

RJSakowski

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Guys when I pull out the pin gage after using them I would wipe that one down with Fluid Film which is a rust preventer and I use this on the lathe.But I don’t use Pin Gage but ever so often,well today I see couple of them is little rusty.So what Im using I guess is not long term,so wondering what others use?What do you wipe down your Pins with how do you prepare you Pins for storage.I got some money invested in these Pins just don’t want to see rust on them.Thanks guys for any direction
After use wipe them down with a cloth dampened with a light oil. The oil coating will provide a barrier to rust. A common cause of rusting is salt. Salt from sweat will leave rusty marks on them. Firearms owners will wipe down their weapons after someone handles them to remove any trace of salt.

When using a pin, wipe the film off with a clean cloth. A good idea anyway, to remove any foreign object which might interfer with the use of the pin.
 

Uglydog

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I wonder is a bag of desissicant would work. Because I'm cheap, I'd experiment with a cloth bag filled with rice. However, consider the implications of rodent attraction.

Daryl
MN

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Kroll

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I bet it would Daryl,Ted I wish my garage was somewhat close in but its not.Where I'm at it would have to run just about 10 months out of the yr.Today I pick up a block of Camphor which is for keeping bugs away but someone here told me to put a block in the case with pins that would prevent rust. I put a 3/4 block in there so we will see if this works.There was also some kind of paper that you can lay in there also with pins but can't remember what it was called.I was thinking about getting a can of T9 give it a try.I was caught of guard when I open the case up today cause I had thought I did a good job applying a coating of that fluid film but guess not.
I guess I could keep them in house till I need them,but will do that I guess after trying few other methods.
 

Uglydog

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One of my mentors (died several years ago) kept his telescoping inside mics submerged in a jar of mineral oil.

Daryl
MN

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ezduzit

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There is a treated paper that sometimes comes packaged with machine tools to prevent rust.
 

matthewsx

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If you're looking for desiccant it's mostly just calcium carbonate. I picked some up from the local horse supply, apparently it's used for dust control. It made short work of drying out my boat this spring, I just put it into little buckets and it turned solid when it had absorbed as much water as it could.

A dehumidifier is probably a good plan too if your shop has high humidity, pick one up used at goodwill or restore.
 

RJSakowski

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Calcium carbonate is limestone. Barn lime is used primarily to reduce slipping on concrete. It is not commonly used as a desiccant.

Years ago we used calcium chloride as a desiccant. It can be oven dried and reused. Cobalt chloride was often mixed with it, as it turned from blue to red when it had absorbed water and was a visual indicator of the need for rejuvenating.

More recently, silica gel is used as it is less corrosive. It is the stuff in the little packets that come inside electronic equipment packages. It can also be rejuvenated by heating in an oven and an indicator like cobalt chloride can be added for a visual end-of-use indicator.

I personally do not rely on desiccants for humidity control. They are OK when fresh but as they absorb water, they are functioning as a constant humidity source. We used them in the lab but we had a regular routine to replace them with fresh desiccant on a weekly basis. We also used desiccators sealed with silicone grease to prevent an exchange of humid air with the interior. Any desiccant which is exposed to outside air will continue to pick up moisture until it is saturated.

A better approach is to use a small oven to maintain a temperature well above the dew point. This is the method used to keep welding rod dry. We also used it to keep phenolic microspheres used in epoxy composites dry. An insulated box with an incandescent light bulb will maintain a temperature of more than 100ºF and is hot enough to prevent any condensation (we used an old refrigerator). 70% RH at 70ºF is only about 25% RH at 105ºF.

If used to prevent corrosion of metrology instruments, you will have to allow them to come to room temperature before use.
 

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Even though I live in Wisconsin where the dew point can be near or even below zero F in the winter, my dehumidifier still runs year round. My basement is only 600 sq ft, but I still have a 70 pint dehumidifier set to maintain 35% humidity. I have never found rust on anything in my basement and I make no efforts at rust proofing. Even a fresh clean weld does not rust.
 
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RJSakowski

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Also in southern Wisconsin, I run the dehumidifier from late May into November. Central A/C also rempves a lot of the moisture when outside temperatures warrant running it. The rest of the year, the wood furnace keeps the humidity low due to its draw of fresh air and keeping the basement warm. I also have about 600 sq. ft. but the 100 y.o. foundation is porous so moisture is constantly coming in. I monitor RH at four different locations in the house so I can do a cold weather dehumidifier activation if needed. The RH ranges from 40% to 65% and I do not have rusting problems.
 

Janderso

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I am fortunate to have recently acquired a complete set of Meyer Pin Gages.
From .011” to .500”.
All the pins are accounted for and they are pristine.
The paper used to absorb moisture is Cortec vapor barrier.
I am a believer. No rust after at least 35 years.8C344D04-6D54-41F1-8EE7-9F04C0FA5917.jpeg248B432B-9AD2-4EB9-8ABC-CFABF0CEE833.jpeg
 

ezduzit

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J--I have the Meyers pin gage set and also that Bondhus (sae) hex set.
 

mmcmdl

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I had sets of pins sitting in the basement for years . Every once in a while I would open the boxes and spray them . They looked great until I pulled the pins out of the bottom box . They were rusted from pulling moisture out of the concrete . :mad: They are since gone .
 

benmychree

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I keep my precision tools in a heated space in winter, no rust problems, but, that's California.
 

matthewsx

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Yes, calcium chloride that’s what I meant:oops:
 

Bob Korves

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I use VCI paper for tools well enclosed in boxes. For steel tools stored in drawers or on shelves in my shop, I use a mixture with 2 parts ATF, 5 parts mineral spirits, and 2 parts anhydrous lanolin. Heat the lanolin gently and until it is completely melted. Add the ATF and mix in. Add the mineral spirits and mix it in. Do not use flame heat. I shake it before each use, but do not know if that is really necessary. I apply a thin wet coat to tools and parts mostly with an old toothbrush, and then let it dry. It leaves a thin coating that is unnoticeable. I have never seen any rust on anything so treated in my unheated shop in Sacramento, Calif. I would not trust it on anything stored exposed outdoors without testing it first on something unimportant.
 
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Janderso

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Where do you get anhydrous lanolin?
What does it do the atf doesn’t?
I know atf is loaded with detergents
Mineral spirits, hugh
I know we get foggy cold days in Sacramento so your recipe should work in most climates.
 

Bob Korves

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RobertB

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I use VCI paper for tools well enclosed in boxes.
Yeah, that is the key to VCI paper. To be effective you have to limit free air circulation around the metal to be protected. Either place the paper in a closed container or completely wrap the tool in the paper.
 

RJSakowski

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Here is an explanation of hoe VCI paper works. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Volatile_corrosion_inhibitor

VCI paper is available on eBay but at a horrendous price. The vendors dealing in packaging materials offer a much better price . $.06/sq. ft. from Global Industrial and $.07/sq. ft. from ULine. The issue is the quantity.... 1000 sheets. That would be a many lifetime supply for most of us.

A good HM project would be to buy the bulk and offer it to members in smaller quantities, say 10 to 50 sheets. Shipping would be the killer but if 9 x 12" sheets were purchased (ULine,$58/1000), 10 in an envelope would mail for $1.30 and 50 for $2.50. Per sheet cost would be %.058 plus some s%h and overhead.

It would be a great idea for giveaways for sale at some of the group gatherings as well.
 
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Kroll

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Do these have a shelve life,say if a person keeps them sealed till a sheet is needed.Say if you keep them in a baggie?
Is this the correct paper?
 
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Bob Korves

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Do these have a shelve life,say if a person keeps them sealed till a sheet is needed.Say if you keep them in a baggie?
Is this the correct paper?
I have had much better results than the link suggests. I do use the paper in closed boxes, and I do keep my stock in air and water tight packaging. I was a parts guy for 40 years. Many parts came in thin cardboard boxes with ends that just pushed into place, no sealing at all, no plastic around the parts. It was quite uncommon to see a factory part in a box with VCI paper with even the slightest amount of corrosion, even new old stock (NOS.) I have seen surplus parts in simple cardboard boxes that have been left out in the weather, and those corroded badly. I live in the California central valley. Just my experience, and worth all that you paid for it... ;)
 

Kroll

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Guys my VCI paper has come in,and I have to say will it looks like just piece of plain ole paper.I don't smell anything,so I cut a piece to fit into my block gage set so I hope this works.Any suggestions,there's not much to it so I guess it absorbs moisture?
Paper.jpg
 

Bob Korves

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I have the same stuff. It lets off a chemical that prevents rusting. It only really works in closed containers, so it should be fine with your gage blocks. However, it will go bad if you do not store your stock of VCI paper in a package with minimum air and zero leakage. A large Ziploc bag that has zero leaks, and you squeeze all the air out of it as you seal it, will work well.
 

Bob Korves

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By the way, Kroll, your photos do not show what type paper you have there. Here is a source to the maker:
Look for sure at the compatibility chart of the different products:
 

Bob Korves

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Kroll, I am using Armor Wrap MPI, FYI...
 
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