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PM-25MV ordered, seeking CNC kit advice

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ExplodingLemur

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After about 8 years (!!!) of looking at various mills (starting with the Sieg X2/X3, then G0704, and finally the PM-25MV) I placed my order! It should ship sometime in late September.
Which brings me to my question. I want to convert it to CNC. What kits have people had experience with? I know of the arizonavideo99 and procutcnc kits. Any thoughts on one vs. the other? Other kits I don't know of?
Thanks!
 

coherent

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#2
I don't have first hand experience with their kits, but Pro Cut CNC has a kit with all the hardware for about $650 that looks well made. You can always get the stepper or servo electronics kit from a place like automation technologies. I do have experience with their stepper/electronics packages and have been satisfied. This would allow you to build to suit with the motor, power supply sizes of your choice and save you some $ . You don't need huge servos for the smaller mills. I've converted a couple of mills and the Nema 23 (and some put a larger Nema 34 on the Z) steppers in the 570oz range perform very well on these size mills with ball screws/nuts. I researched arizonavideo's kits when I converted a Grizzly mill and his kits receive high praise from those who have bought them. I decided to use the mill "in manual mode" to make the mounts etc myself and ordered the ball screws etc to fit which is another option if you want build your own and save even a little more.
 

shooter123456

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I would make your own! You will save a ton of money and learn to use the machine a little bit. I converted my PM-25 with a kit I designed, got some ballscrews online and it was very easy. The way this machine was built, it is very easy to convert to CNC.
 

GunsOfNavarone

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Yeah, if you're half as sharp as these guys around here and you can design your own (I'm with you, sounds tough) you'd save a lot of cash. I poked around and the kids i saw were 3 to 5k! Seems like the mechanical adaptations wouldn't be bad, but getting that into a computer and working with software...I wouldn't know where to start. Enjoy it the way it is for a while! Congrats!
 

pontiac428

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Here's another voice for rolling your own kit. You can spec your ideal parts and buy only what you need. Wiring and fitting are going to need to be done with or without a kit purchase. You can use the money you save to buy electronics that are made in USA with good support available, rather than Chinese stuff. I bought Geckodrive stepper drives and PMDX control and I/O boards for less than "bundled" China parts through a forum. By the time you are done, you will know the system inside and out- which is a big plus in my book. There's a learning curve no matter what, so you may as well skip a lot of the hardware frustration (at least) by avoiding kits and shopping for higher quality used components.
 

ExplodingLemur

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I poked around and the kids i saw were 3 to 5k!
What kits were you looking at? The Pro-Cut CNC and arizonavideo kits are around $650-$750. They come with ballscrews, mounts, and couplers for the X/Y/Z axes and bolt on to the mill.
 

GunsOfNavarone

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FlashCut and Grizzly. The kits your speaking of, is this everything (minus the PC) to get up and running? That is TOTALLY reasonable. I like Pontiac's argument as well, just think that might be very frustrating. Subscribed to see this evolve! Good luck Lemur!
 

ExplodingLemur

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Mill: $1600 (+$400 misc accessories to get started)
Ballscrews/mounts: $750
Steppers/drivers/optoisolator board: $600ish
I've got spare PC parts around including a parallel port card

So around $3350 to get running total.
 

GunsOfNavarone

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I would make your own! You will save a ton of money and learn to use the machine a little bit. I converted my PM-25 with a kit I designed, got some ballscrews online and it was very easy. The way this machine was built, it is very easy to convert to CNC.
Where can I find your build at? If it's better AND less cost? I'm in! Mine would be for a PM-727M but I assume it could be altered (other than motor drive details...if it even related to that...)
 

shooter123456

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Where can I find your build at? If it's better AND less cost? I'm in! Mine would be for a PM-727M but I assume it could be altered (other than motor drive details...if it even related to that...)
My machine is here: https://www.hobby-machinist.com/threads/new-pm-25mv-mill.65939/

I can't say whether it is better, but I am confident it costs less. The stepper and ballscrew mounts were basically free (Maybe $5 in scrap aluminum), the ballscrews actually ended up being free because they were defective, but maybe $250 for a decent set of new ones, couplers $15, motors $100, drives $120 or so, etc etc.
 
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