Potd - Project Of The Day- What Did You Do In Your Shop Today?

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hman

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well, as the tool was traveling down the threads and taking them off, i could see the tip of the tool flexing up and down. crap, i think i did;t leave enough metal to support the tool, and of course, taking a light cut with carbide is not really pretty either. i probably should stick with has or cobalt and just keep grinding as needed. . .

Before you give up, I'd suggest milling just a smidgen of material off the top of the tool, so the clamp can move downward a bit. It kinda looks like the top of the steel is either even with the top of the insert, or maybe just a slight bit high, allowing the movement you observed. The support beneath the insert looks OK to me.

And by the way, thanks for the idea. I've always thought brazed carbide tools were kind of wasteful. Now I have something I can do with them when I pull a stupid goof!
 

cathead

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Looks like you could do away with the clamp and silver solder the carbide
in place and that would hold. That can be done easily using a torch
or MAPP gas. I save old scrap carbide for making tooling and
it has several advantages. First, it is inexpensive and second, you don't
have to wait for the UPS man.





Before you give up, I'd suggest milling just a smidgen of material off the top of the tool, so the clamp can move downward a bit. It kinda looks like the top of the steel is either even with the top of the insert, or maybe just a slight bit high, allowing the movement you observed. The support beneath the insert looks OK to me.

And by the way, thanks for the idea. I've always thought brazed carbide tools were kind of wasteful. Now I have something I can do with them when I pull a stupid goof!
 

road

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The kids gave me some me time to finish making my new matching handles today.

003.JPG 004.JPG
 

wnec65

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Installed a power feed on my Grizzly 0704. Took about 2 hours with no hitches. It did necessitate my I-Gaging being moved to the back of the table.


powerfeed 004.JPG

powerfeed 004.JPG
 

cathead

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Resurrected an OLD motor and made ?

Well, I've been working on this project for a few days now. A friend gave me
an old electric motor which I didn't end up using for anything. It's been laying
around in the shop for months. It is a Brushed AC 110-220v motor with brass
bushings, the kind with a ring on the shaft dipping into the oil reservoir and
some real brass Gits oilers. It was really dirty, that took a day to get it
cleaned up. Then I noticed the armature had been rubbing on the field
assembly, a sure clue that the bearings might be worn. The motor shaft side
was pretty loose so I removed it from the case and squeezed it a bit in my 4 jaw
lathe chuck. Not much play now. After cleaning up the brushes and armature,
it ran just fine. Well it ran fine but the output shaft was out of true by 20 thousandths
or so. A few good hits with a big hammer and it was straight enough to be
undetectable. Also a 12 inch wire wheel was given me by a friend so made an
arbor for that. As luck would have it I found a truck axle shaft and a matching
rim so made a base using that. The hard part was cutting off the axle. It was
very hard material! The HSS cutoff just made a few turns and was dull. On to
the carbide cutter... not much luck there either, it cut hair fine blue in color chips
and immediately the leading edge of the cutter gave way. I had to grind it in half
with my angle grinder. Finally it all came together with a bit of band saw work
and welding. I think I will put this outfit in an outbuilding and use it there
since it is a messy tool leaving rust residue all over the place. I think some heavy
gloves will be in order and maybe some rocks piled into the wheel rim for stability.
I still have to clean up and paint the stand but for the most part it's complete.

IMG_0525.JPG IMG_0528.JPG
 

randyjaco

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Hey Cathead,
Nice work on that motor, but you really ought to get rid of that wire wheel. You need to find a twisted wire wheel to replace it. Any wire wheel is dangerous, as when the wires break, they come off at tremendous speed. (Think sharp pointed bullets) not only are they dangerous for the eyes, but other parts of the body. Since the wheel has no guard, those projectiles are going 360 degrees. I truly hope you are wearing goggles and protective clothing when you run that thing. The twisted wire will not stop the fragment, but it will reduce them. Please be very careful of that device.

Randy
 

tazza

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Feb 22, 2013
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Randy - with twist knot brushes, i find you don't have the save versatility as you do with the standard wires. I use a wire wheel to clean up bolt threads, not sure how well a twist knot one would do that.

Yes, wires do break off and fly out at high speed. Eyes are always a must when using one or any grinding tool. I find that they only just pierce the skin, never really deep.
 

Mark in Indiana

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Jun 14, 2014
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Randy - with twist knot brushes, i find you don't have the save versatility as you do with the standard wires. I use a wire wheel to clean up bolt threads, not sure how well a twist knot one would do that.

Yes, wires do break off and fly out at high speed. Eyes are always a must when using one or any grinding tool. I find that they only just pierce the skin, never really deep.

Twist knot or braided wire wheels are more aggressive and seem to last longer than their straight wire counterparts. I use them on my grinder and on my air sander (in cup wheel form). They make short work of the job.

Shrapnel is a normal danger of using a wire wheel. The best way to reduce the danger is to wear safety goggles along with a full face shield, buy only high quality wire wheels, and wear protective clothing so you're picking more wires out of your clothes instead of your skin.


Happy Trails!
 

MattM

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Aug 5, 2012
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Made a manifold to distribute Argon gas to wine kegs in our barrel room and thence to the tap heads in the tasting room. The Argon protects the wine from oxygen and drives the wine to the tap heads.

Manifold2.jpg

Hardest part was drilling the hole through the brass block. I used the mill and worked up very slowly from both ends. Not perfect but it doesn't have to be since it is gas at only 3-7psi.

I now have capacity to run six separate kegs. Our plan is to have all of our wines available in bottle and in growlers.

Manifold1.jpg Manifold2.jpg
 
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