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Potd - Project Of The Day- What Did You Do In Your Shop Today?

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HBilly1022

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I see the the dreaded red x but I think it might be my computer since I'm having issues with it lately and have never had a problem seeing f350ca's posts before.
 

roadie33

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Made the hoops for the barrel, 1/2 inch banding silver soldered with a lap joint.

Greg
Looks great.
I wonder how some home brew would age in it and what it would taste like after?
But what are you going to do with it?
 

dave_r_1

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me too. had to do the 'reply' trick (hit the reply button in the post) to see his nicely made barrel.
 

WoodBee

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I doubt such a tap exists, or at least isn't readily available. The threads are about 45mm diameter, maybe 1mm pitch or so.
What I meant is use a tap as a thread gauge. In this case any tap with a 1 mm pitch. I believe thread form and depth should be the same, no matter the diameter. It could be used to verify your measurements with the play-doh.

As for everything on the lathe being metric: so am I
But seriously: if you don't have access to a metric tap with the desired pitch the idea to use it as a thread gauge obviously isn't going to be helpful either.

Peter
 
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f350ca

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I can't figure the red X thing. Some days pictures come through right away, sometimes after a while. Im using a Mac desktop with Safari.
Thanks for the patience and comments.

Greg
 

dave_r_1

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Finished v1.0 of a powered grass catcher for my 52" Snapper Pro walk-behind mower (the same one that on another thread, I made a snow plow attachment for it).

I did buy the main parts of the catcher, mainly so it would look semi-professional. The front part where the grass bags are is from an Ariens zero-turn bagging setup, the blower motor/fan is from a DR Power power vacuum setup, and a Trac Vac chute on the output of the mower deck.

Here's the main bracket for securing the grass bag setup:
IMG_0833.jpg
IMG_0834.jpg
It comes off by pulling 4 pins, for when I mow and I don't need the grass catcher setup. In an extremely rare (for me) showing of skill, I welded it all together and the holes for the 4 pins exactly lined up, so the pins could easily slide in/out (without the weight of the bagger setup). Naturally, once I had this completely as you see here, I realized that, when it's bolted to the drive unit, the two brackets are pulled slightly together, and 2 of the bracket holes no longer lined up...doh. Drilled them out and it works fine again.

The motor assembly slides in from the side, with a single pin holding it in, and the chute also comes off with a single pin.

And here's the whole thing, all assembled:
IMG_0835.jpg
IMG_0836.jpg
IMG_0837.jpg

I also bought slightly wider rear wheels, as overall, I've added about 150 pounds to the mower, and grass can be pretty sensitive to too much pressure (if the grass is really dry, you can leave strips of brown grass from the wheels, shows up after a couple of days, or if the ground is wet, wheels dig in too much).

It was raining out today, but I took it out for a short spin on a local park and it did a decent job of vacuuming up leaves and debris from it, even when everything was pretty wet.

However, after getting everything together, I think the hose between the chute and the blower motor is kinked a little too much, so I'm going to remake the bracket for the blower motor so the motor itself mounts directly to my bracket instead of having DR Powers "mount" in between (I kept it on to make it easy to remount on the original power vacuum if I ever wanted to use it again, which is actually unlikely). As a bonus, it will shed maybe 10 pounds or so.
 

dave_r_1

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Spent some time working on v2 of the mount for my blower motor for my bagger system.

v1:
IMG_0838.jpg
v2:
IMG_0839.jpg

Lowered the engine about 5", making for a noticeably better offset between the chute and the deck (so the hose connecting them is a little straighter and a little shorter).

And I think I'm turning into a CNC machine. Measured and drilled the 4 5/16" holes for bolting the engine down, and all 4 bolts went in without needing to enlarge any of the holes.
 

xman_charl

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Grizzly "heavy duty bench drill press"

Sure, heavy duty, whatever…

On sale for $299

AC motor worked okay, but sort of oscillated, so
Put this stiffing plate, over tension rods. Sandwiched motor mounting plate with that stiffing plate.

Green motor mounting plate came with drill press, sort of cheap…

Tested everything out, worked okay.

Next.... DC motor swap.

Both motors are 3/4 HP.

Slots on both motor mounting plates aligned
with both motors, mounting holes….except

Bottom holes of DC motor extended below motor
mounting plate.

Gray adjustable motor mounting plate, about $25, from surplus center. Some of those
adjustable motor mounting plates cost $50 or more, from other suppliers.

drill press build_1.JPG drill press build_2.JPG drill press build_3.JPG

4 round spacers to clear, tension rod motor mounting plate, nuts

Ran it, with my test DC motor power box,
works good.

Cannot stand to be without a drill press. Could
use my square column bench mill, but
it’s a beast. Older drill press works okay, but
needs new bearings. Will eventually replace them.

Run out on new drill press, arbor, (chuck not installed) less than .001

Charl
 

woodtickgreg

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I really gotta learn about how to wire controllers and such to dc motors. I come across tread mills and their motors all the time.
 

38Bill

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So it all started with aligning the tail stock on my lathe. I was using a scrap piece of SS shaft to make the test cuts and when I was finally done I had this nice piece of straight shaft so I had to do something with it. As I didn't have one of these dual indicator tools and the shaft seemed like the perfect start I built this. Pretty basic so I added a little bling to it to jazz it up.
tramming tool.jpg
 

mksj

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Had a few slitting saws that I wanted an arbor for, looked online and really didn't care for what was available and the $ of some of the better arbors. Since I had standardized on 1" hole for the arbor, I didn't need one with an adjustable hole, nor needed multiple arbors. Spent the day and turned some 1.5" oil rod and was able to get very minimal runout. I use the same wrench as I use on the QCTP to hold the arbor and it locks with a 5/16" Allen bolt with a spring lock washer. Nice to make some chips on this project.
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38Bill

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serving boards.jpg So I'm out in the shop cleaning up from my morning metal working and my daughter shows up with a "little" project for me. She and her husband have a coffee shop/cafe/bike shop and they also serve craft beer. She had purchased 26 bamboo cutting boards to use to serve their beer samplers on. Of course they wanted them machined to hold the five small glasses that they use for the sampler. I have never worked with bamboo before but it machined very nicely. And here I was thinking that metal working was messy.......
 

woodchucker

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Had a few slitting saws that I wanted an arbor for, looked online and really didn't care for what was available and the $ of some of the better arbors. Since I had standardized on 1" hole for the arbor, I didn't need one with an adjustable hole, nor needed multiple arbors. Spent the day and turned some 1.5" oil rod and was able to get very minimal runout. I use the same wrench as I use on the QCTP to hold the arbor and it locks with a 5/16" Allen bolt with a spring lock washer. Nice to make some chips on this project.
View attachment 231088View attachment 231089 View attachment 231090 View attachment 231091
I like the light. Does it really light the work? I find led's to not light as well, don't know why whether it's the color, the soft look. Many are actually flashing at a very high rate of frequency. When I would take my high powered flashlight out to walk the dog and make sure there were no deer, or fox, that he would chase I would see the effect against the fog or rain. So maybe that's what I am seeing as not as sharp as incandescent.
 

mksj

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I like the light. Does it really light the work?
There is a wide variation on the light output and color for LEDs, often they have the wrong color spectrum so they appear either too yellow or blue, the latter appears dimmer. I often use a combination of LEDs to prevent shadows, and also for the color balance. I use a light bar and then a focused light source on the work, light color is usually something in the 3200-4000K which is considered Daylight spectrum. The combination of the LED light bar and halo ring is about equivalent to 150-200W with halogen bulbs, but without the heat. Everything runs off of DC, have not had any issues with flicker. I often use Philips daylight LED MR16 bulbs which have higher lumen output and the light bar is an industrial one made by Waldman, make a very big difference in the quality of the light.
20161121_162102.jpg20161121_163600.jpg
 

Cheeseking

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Made an adjustable tooling rack for my Tormach TTS holders and some commonly used tools like the Haimer or my caliper etc. Mounted it to the enclosure using the existing screws so no customizing required. Used shelf standards from the big box store and S4S pine for the shelves. Hole pattern machined on the 1100 of course. . This wont be my actual tool placement but I wanted to put some on the shelves to take pics...
ImageUploadedByTapatalk1491879424.063849.jpg
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ImageUploadedByTapatalk1491879450.963253.jpg
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ImageUploadedByTapatalk1491879497.681648.jpg
 

extropic

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After another look, I see you have all those shelf brackets, IMO, upside down (perpendicular edge down). I don't think I've ever see brackets that are, what can I say, AC/DC? But I like it.

Please post a pic of the business end of an un-mounted bracket for my (our?) education or 'fes up, you made the brackets too?
 

MozamPete

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Please post a pic of the business end of an un-mounted bracket for my (our?) education or 'fes up, you made the brackets too?
Looks like custom made brackets to me - commercial ones have a angle bend into them for the shelf to sit on.
 

Cheeseking

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Ya I bought one standard shelf bracket and then reverse engineered the hook profile. Designed the side profiles to match the standard lumber widths. Brackets are 16 ga 430 SS cut on laser. I went thru several iterations before finding the down angle that worked best.
As far as wood causing rust I have heard that potential issue but in all the years Ive used it for my Bp collets, drills etc never once had a spec of rust on my tools. Could be I keep them cleaned and oiled?? Also my basement shop is relatively dry and constant humidity so maybe that is part of it. I do have some 3/4" hdpe I can use but the pine is cheap and easy to cut to length, machine and test various hole patterns. I could easily have just fabricated the whole shelf/side bracket as one integral pc of ss but Was trying to keep things simple (minimal press brake work) and not be locked in to a fixed width.
Heres the profile.
ImageUploadedByTapatalk1491907853.212320.jpg
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HBilly1022

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Started making Harold Hall's end mill sharpener and had some mishaps. They say you learn more from your mistakes so I should be learning fast. :D I couldn't figure out a good way to drill and tap the hole in the bottom of the collets. I didn't think I could machine the whole collet then flip it around to hold the tapered end in the 3 jaw, so I figured I'd just drill the hole in the bottom while I still had the collet chucked on the parent piece. That turned out to be a bad decision. I made all 4 collets, then chucked them in the 3 jaw to tap and discovered 2 things, 1) it was easy to chuck in the 3 jaw .... I just had to indicate the part to get it centered and 2) the drill holes were not centered :eek:. I decided to tap them anyways and see how bad the fit would be but then mistake number 2 ..... I broke a tap in one of the collets. Looks like I may have to make a new set of collets and drill / tap the back ends after flipping them end for end. At least I'm gaining more experience.

The spindle is the tall piece and the collet in the front is the one with the broken tap in it.
upload_2017-4-11_7-54-26.png

Here's a pic with a collet in the 3 jaw all ready to be tapped. But I need to get more taps first and maybe make another set of collets.
upload_2017-4-11_7-57-35.png

Since I couldn't finish the collet tapping I decided to make a jig for sharpening my slitting saw. This is also from Harold Hall's book. I couldn't finish it either because I don't have any small enough cap screws for the side mounted indexing spring. Calls for M3 but I will use a UNC equivalent. Just have to wait till I go into the big city again.
upload_2017-4-11_8-2-31.png

I didn't get a pic of it, but I finished my larger outboard spider and used it to hold the long piece of 1 1/2" stock used for the spindle and collets. I mounted the long stock piece and indicated the outboard end before tightening the 3 jaw. After roughing one of the pieces down I checked and found that there was a taper in it. How could that be. I checked the lathe set up before hand to make sure it was running true to the ways. Took a bit of tail chasing but I came to the conclusion that the long stock (not being straight) was causing this. At least I think that was the issue. In any case it went away after I reversed the setup and tightened down the chuck first then the outboard end. I figured that by tightening down the outboard end first, I was forcing the bend to be carried through the jaws and not allowing the chuck jaws from grabbing the stock along the entire length of the jaw.

Here's a pic of the smaller spider that screws into the lathe spindle.
upload_2017-4-11_8-21-57.png

Heading into the city today and hope to get the supplies I need to carry on.
 

chips&more

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Picked up an as-is Levin double tool cross slide that needed a shaft with gear part. So I made one. Luckily the sample part had a few teeth left. So I was able to hand grind a HSS tool bit to match the spacing between the teeth and did the gear with the fly cutter method. I made the shaft with gear out of 1144. I think I’m going to leave it alone and not heat treat it…time will tell. The original part was harder, but then most of the teeth broke off to. So, maybe it was too hard.
levingear.JPG
 
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