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Potd - Project Of The Day- What Did You Do In Your Shop Today?

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Franko

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I like the fuel injection on my Honda Rancher. All the others I've owned (and thumper dirt bikes) required several minutes of warm up before they'd go. You can just start it like a car and move it across the yard without waiting 5 minutes and tinkering with the choak until it warm up.

I have a service manual for this ATV. It shows and explains how to diagnose and fix anything on it. There are some special tools, but mostly a multi-meter and a basic set of tools is about all you need. No computer required, though I'm sure the dealer has one.

This is the second Rancher I've owned. The first was 4-wheel drive and had electronic shift. 4-wheel was kinda neat, but not really necessary for my purposes. I hated the electronic shift. I have a Warn wench on this one that should get me out of any trouble that I'd need 4-wheel for.
 

RJSakowski

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Greg, quiet and economical, I'll give you that. I have run Mercury's for thirty-five years and am generally happy with their performance.
 
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f350ca

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There's no question that the fuel injection makes them more user friendly, just scares me to think of it quitting in the middle of no where. Duct tape and hay wire isn't going to get it home. I think thats the same machine I have Franco but they call them a TRX up here. Went for the manual shift as well. Don't think they offer 2 wheel drive up here.
I've had Mercury's Evinrude's and Marniner's R J, they all served me well. We had a Firestone 3 hp when I was a kid, must have put thousands of hours on that thing.
My 20 some year old 3 hp 2 stoke mercury was getting tired so bought a 2.4 mercury four stroke last fall. Sure a lot quieter and doesn't vibrate the aluminum canoe the same. Need to take it in and get it checked out though, it doesn't start as nice as it should.

Greg
 

Franko

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Greg, mine is a TRX420-TM

I have a Force 40 hp on my 16' Tracker. It has been a great engine.

I don't think there are many vehicles less than 15 years old that don't have solid state modules. Personally, I'd probably be about the same screwed 40 miles out in the middle of nowhere no matter what kind of set up it was. My late 90s Caravan had computers in it and it wasn't fuel injected. I know it had computers because I had to purchase two of them after about 110K miles.
 
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kvt

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I use one of the old tool post knurlers to do that with. Seems to work but f have to press a little hard it will leave a knurl pattern on it. Have though of taking the knurls out an putting in just regular bearings but still have to get some. (keep forgetting to write the size down, and look some up, thus never got done. ) But it does work., I kind of like yours also. Question do you leave it loose on the QCTP, I do that with the knurler and it floats a bit as needed.
 

T Bredehoft

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Verify that the point of contact with the base and the point of the TI are truly vertical, not offset sideways. Any offset will nullify your findings.

I like your base. nice three point support. Did you indicate the top? is is parallel the granite surface plate?
 

dave_r_1

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Finished making the mounts for the bagger, as part of fabricating a larger power vacuum.

I've got a smaller, commercially produced one, similar to this(mine is older, and not self-propelled):
https://www.lawnmowerhosp.com/product/billy-goat-kv-series-vaccums-931
but I find that the bag it uses is a hassle to empty, particularly if you let it get too full (and it's easy to do that), and the hose attachment for vacuuming out harder to reach spots that you can't use the main vacuum on is fairly small (4" diameter) and clogs easily with small branches.

Last year, i made a powered bagger for a large walk-behind mower, and the blower I used came with a 6" diameter attachment (long hose with wand, same as that for the above unit, just bigger) and that worked really well last fall. The only problem was that the mower is pretty big and limited where I could go to use it. So, I'm reusing that same blower (I'll used it for both, and am making it fairly easy to swap between the two), and bagger (I have a second unit for holding the debris), and making a push vacuum that can get into smaller area's.

Here's the basic frame with the bagger (hood and bags for debris removed to make it easier to fab the stuff) mounted on it:
IMG_1064.jpg
IMG_1065.jpg

Tomorrow, I'll begin working on a new blower exit chute. The existing one I have is designed to angle the debris flow in a big arc upwards and back, to go into a large box on wheels, and I modified it a bit to work ok on my mower, but it winds up making this push unit too wide. So, I'll attempt to make a straight chute that goes from a roughly 8"x4" rectangular opening on the blower, to a 7" diameter circle to put a hose on to connect it to the bagger. I bought a ring roller for making the round end from a couple of strips of 1/8"x1" flat steel, weld up a rectangle for the other end, and then mangle lengths of 1/8"x1" flat steel to connect the two.
 

Redmech

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Verify that the point of contact with the base and the point of the TI are truly vertical, not offset sideways. Any offset will nullify your findings.

I like your base. nice three point support. Did you indicate the top? is is parallel the granite surface plate?
The way I understand these to work, is get the indicator set to read against a vertical plant in the center area of the convex radius then rock the base back and forth against the cylinder square to find thre closest reading, working your way all around the cylinder square, finding total difference, then splitting the difference in two, to find the perpendicular plane.

The skate was parallel with in a few tenths before drilling holes for the ball bearings, i drilled the holes all to the same depth, but haven’t checked it since installing the bearings. Where this tool isn’t really designed to check squareness from top to bottom in one smooth sliding motion like the high end squaresness checking devices, I’m not sure perfect parallelism is necessary. I copied Stan’s video from BarZ on youtube,

I may go back to my mill and cut the front bumper convex radius down on the top side so the bumper portion is only maybe .200” thick instead of 3/4” like it is now.

Thanks for the interest and thoughts. It’s a simple device only as accurate as the person using it can make it perform.
 

BFHammer

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Built a rack for my turning and other small stock. It’s nice to get it in one place instead of on the workbench, stacked in the corner, on the other workbench and on the shelf. Made completely out of the steel scrap I had lying around.


E0AE61D8-1A42-4655-9D92-584A8C0C5067.jpeg08A1415C-27E0-45B9-97C8-8E88EDEA7FAA.jpeg2FDDE439-548B-41CC-AEE0-99725F5AE52C.jpeg8230A74D-CF3F-47E5-8AC4-8C8ACFECD15A.jpeg
 

tweinke

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Nice way to organize your materials! My bench and all available corners hold my stock at this time but that may have to change now that I see what you have done.
 

ch2co

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Entirely too organized!
I’m also quite jealous.
Well done.
 

dave_r_1

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Continuing on with this project (https://www.hobby-machinist.com/threads/potd-project-of-the-day-what-did-you-do-in-your-shop-today.14637/post-562589), yesterday I bought a cheap 1" ring roller from PrincessAuto (same one as the Harbor Freight one), 1" x 3/16" capacity.

Evidently I picked good ring roller, as even with using stock wider than it is designed for, the ring didn't twist very much (ie, the ends of the ring were only offset sideways about 1/2" in my 7" ring).

Clamped to my precision welding table, and then ran 2 strips of 1.5"x1/8" mild steel through it. Worked ok, I ran it through on both edges because it's wider than the rollers, would leave maybe 3/4" at each end unbent. After getting the right diameters, trimmed the ends to get the right length, welded the ends together, then ground the weld smooth. Then I ran each hoop through the ring roller again to get the welded part round as well.
IMG_1066.jpg
then welded the two hoops together and ground the weld flat. The flexible tube will slide onto this part, and carry debris to the bagger.
IMG_1067.jpg

Then, I fashioned the flange that mounts onto the blower. Not too bad to do, just my usual problem of being unable to drill holes where I want them to go.
IMG_1068.jpg

Tomorrow, it's cutting/bending/welding strips of 1x1/8 and 1.5x1/8 steel to connect these two parts, so they are about 6" apart.
 

pdentrem

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RWM’s post of his bedside lamp, inspired me to post a couple pictures of a lamp I rebuilt last month. These goose neck lamps are NOT cheap and it had been dropped and the plastic housing was shattered. It was tossed into the garbage at work. I grabbed it and thought about making a new housing for the transformer and switch. One of those SS insulated mugs was cut opened and with a little thinking I was able to make the lamp functional again! I used the plastic cover which was the bottom of the mug as the top cover. Reinforced the top after drilling a hole for the neck to prevent flex there and a plug in the now bottom to attach to the base and brass screws holding the can to the plug. Looks pretty good to me!

537557C2-0AB6-4CFF-8946-472DA5766BAF.jpeg2BFA7317-A6E7-4A20-A5E2-09765158D5DC.jpeg
 

dave_r_1

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Continuing on this project (previous post: https://www.hobby-machinist.com/threads/potd-project-of-the-day-what-did-you-do-in-your-shop-today.14637/post-563041)

Connected the rectangular flange to the round one. Used 1.5x1/8" strips until I ran out of it, then some ~1.25x1/8" (from cutting down the width of a long piece of 8x1/8" for another project), and finished up with some 1x1/8" strips.

Warning: the welding is....uh....not particularly good...

Partly done:
IMG_1069.jpg

Done:
IMG_1070.jpg

IMG_1071.jpg
Mounted on the blower:
IMG_1072.jpg

Original Chute (it's been cut down about 8" already to make it more usable with the bagger system on the walk behind mower):
IMG_1073.jpg

Tomorrow I have to massage it a bit with a prybar, as all that welding has pulled the two end flanges out of round/rectangular a little, and grind/re-weld it so it looks nicer. The inside turned out pretty smooth, which is good as debris will catch on rough points and then start building up over time.
 

Dredb

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I liked your warning about the welding not being pretty, it doesn't actually look too bad. Some of mine looks like chicken dung. I don't do a lot of welding, it takes an hour or so to get back into it, by which time the job's finished and chicken dung is holding the part together. Amazing what you can do with filler!
 

FanMan

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Today I finished making a wood cart for my oxyacetylene welding tanks. I had been using the tiniest size bottles in a plastic carrier, but a friend gave me a set of the next size larger tanks. Had them strapped to a hand truck for awhile, but that took the hand truck out of commission. The end result is laughably crude but functional, and met the goal of making it 100% from materials on hand, purchasing nothing.

The handle folds down so I can put it in my truck without laying it down (which you should never do with an acetylene tank). Wheels are from a rusted out Weber grill, axle bolts from the treadmill I pilfered for my mill motor conversion, a few other odds and ends, all else is scrap wood I had laying around.

IMG_20180228_220920112.jpg
IMG_20180301_184831869.jpg
 

brino

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The end result is laughably crude but functional, and met the goal of making it 100% from materials on hand, purchasing nothing.
Nothing wrong with some Yankee frugality!
Seems sturdy and functional, and meets all the requirements.
-brino
 

dave_r_1

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Continuing on this project (https://www.hobby-machinist.com/threads/potd-project-of-the-day-what-did-you-do-in-your-shop-today.14637/post-563420)

After killing most of a grinding wheel and some more welding where I ground a bit too much due to the strips not being even enough (the 2 or 3 I didn't get the side of the strip very even with the previous one, but after that I learned how to make then better).

The result:

IMG_1074.jpg

Still have to add a small safety tab (the blower as safety switches on both the input and output, so the engine stops/can't run if either chute isn't on), and then some paint, but this thing is done.

Time to move on to fashioning a mount for the blower on the frame, so the blower assembly can be easily attached/removed with just a pin or two to hold it in place, so I can transfer it between this vacuum and the mower.

But that will have to wait, as there is snow in the forecast for the next couple days....
 

mattthemuppet2

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Made a hamster powered LED light with my youngest daughter and her friend for their science fair project. Made a pulley and an axle for it and they did the drilling, painting and assembling. Took 2 iterations to get it to work right, but unfortunately Hammy the Hamster didn't have enough power to get the motor/ generator to turn. I guess it needs more than 1HP :)
Hamster powered LED light 1.jpgHamster powered LED light 2.jpgHamster powered LED light 3.jpg
 

MontanaAardvark

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Made a hamster powered LED light with my youngest daughter and her friend for their science fair project. Made a pulley and an axle for it and they did the drilling, painting and assembling. Took 2 iterations to get it to work right, but unfortunately Hammy the Hamster didn't have enough power to get the motor/ generator to turn. I guess it needs more than 1HP :)
View attachment 260650View attachment 260651View attachment 260652
This is the best thing I've seen in days. It's first thing I've seen here that made me laugh out loud.
 
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