Potd - Project Of The Day- What Did You Do In Your Shop Today?

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mattthemuppet2

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You are getting more use out of that collet chuck than I got out of it since the late 60's,Matt:)
it's one of the coolest things I've ever been given (after my "I love Dad" mug and the like) and it'll get a ton more use too. I have a lot more projects lined up including a couple of high power LED lights for my mountain bike which I'm not quite ready for yet. I'll just have to remember not to buy any more metric tooling!
 

zmotorsports

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Played with a little more threading last night to get a feel for it on my new lathe.

Ground my own HSS threading tool. 60* cutting angle, 5* helix angle.
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Helix angle can be seen a little better in this picture.
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Flat is ground @ a width of Pitch/8. Calculated out to .0096". Turns out I passed it a bit but @ a fat .0011" I should be fine.
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I like to just breath over a stone with the cutting edges prior to beginning.
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Cut my relief groove, then set up the bit in the toolholder.
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Marked it with a Sharpie for visual reasons and made a scratch pass to verify thread pitch was correct.
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Completed. The nut threaded right on and is a nice fit. I shot for a 2A fit.
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All in all threading on my new lathe is a pleasure.

Mike.
 

drs23

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Good job Mike! I'm not in the least surprised to see that you're pleased with your lathe. Can't wait to see you get the mill set up and running after it gets there.

Dale
 

zmotorsports

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Last night I had some time to kill while waiting for a guy to pick up his bike so I thought I would cross another item off of my list of things to do. I had wanted to make a larger die holder for my tailstock threading die holder for years and never seemed to get around to it. I didn't have one for 1.5" round dies so I grabbed some 1144 round stock out of the rack and cut a 2" long piece of 1.75" diameter off in my new to me Jet 7x12 horizontal bandsaw that I finally refurbished and got up and running.

Turning one half down to 1.00" diameter to fit precisely into the smaller die.
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While machining this part I decided to focus on getting more familiar with my new lathe and seeing just how accurate it is and how repeatable I can make cuts. Like everyone else, once you get a feel for your machine you have a much more precise idea of what kind of roughing cuts you can make and how close to your final dimensions you can get prior to your finishing cut(s).

Here I removed .080" (.040" actual DOC). Machine didn't even flinch. Keep in mind that this is only a 1300 pound/2hp lathe, not one of the 3k pound/5+ HP monsters that some of you guys may have.
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Now I decided to push it a little and take half a dial revolution and measure for accuracy. Here is a .050" DOC, .100 total diameter removal. This dial is taking some getting used to but I am getting much more comfortable with the total diameter markings vs. what I was used to with dial markings signifying crossfeed movement. Prior to this cut I had a measurement of 1.331" and after this cut I had landed at a measurement of 1.229", .002" difference from target to actual.
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Okay now I decided to take that measurement and make one complete revolution of the crossfeed dial in two consecutive cuts, each cut taking .100" material removal for a total target of .200" material removal. Starting measurement was 1.229" and after one complete dial revolution in two .100" cuts I landed at a measurement of 1.031". Only .002" shy of my target in one revolution of the crossfeed dial, I'll take it. I am completely satisfied with that. Now I am at least getting a very comfortable feeling for the machine to rough out and get within .010"-.020" before taking another measurement and dialing in on the final dimension.
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After measurement I offset my dial to the final dimension and took a final cut of about .014" and faced out.
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My target was 1.000" and after the final cut of .014" here is my actual dimension. Sorry, I should have grabbed a micrometer for this but was too lazy to walk to the toolbox and get another measuring tool out for something that had some margin. I was more trying to make a target dimension and shoot for it to get a feel for the machine.

Final measurement was 1.0005". Half a thou off from target. Very satisfied.
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Breaking the edge and throwing a chamfer on each of the two sharp edges.
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Test fit into the smaller die holder prior to turning around and machining the other half.
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1.5" round thread die drops right in. All I have to do now is drill/tap for my retaining screws.
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After chamfering the outer edge and the inner bore.
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And after all cleaned up and ready to be put to bed for the evening.
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Mike.
 

drs23

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Looks like you're becoming very comfortable with your new lathe rather quickly. Not that your a beginner but like you said, it's takes a little time to become accustomed to any new machine. Good job.
 

zmotorsports

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Looks like you're becoming very comfortable with your new lathe rather quickly. Not that your a beginner but like you said, it's takes a little time to become accustomed to any new machine. Good job.
Thanks Dale. Yeah, I am getting very comfortable with it. I commented to my wife after closing up shop last night just how easy it is to hold such tight tolerances and what a joy it is to operate. Feeling better and better each day about the purchase.

Although the lathe was a no brainer for me when I first started looking at updating my machinery, the mill is what I was torn back and forth on. I sure hope it is every bit as nice a piece of equipment as the lathe.

Mike.
 

springer

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Thanks Dale. Yeah, I am getting very comfortable with it. I commented to my wife after closing up shop last night just how easy it is to hold such tight tolerances and what a joy it is to operate. Feeling better and better each day about the purchase.

Although the lathe was a no brainer for me when I first started looking at updating my machinery, the mill is what I was torn back and forth on. I sure hope it is every bit as nice a piece of equipment as the lathe.

Mike.
i want that lathe so bad!!! i started a "savings fund" in my top drawer of the toolbox about a month ago and will hopefully be ready to order in about 6 months. i love seeing what you do with it. keep the posting up, haha
 

zmotorsports

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i want that lathe so bad!!! i started a "savings fund" in my top drawer of the toolbox about a month ago and will hopefully be ready to order in about 6 months. i love seeing what you do with it. keep the posting up, haha
Thanks, I appreciate that. Yeah, I love this lathe as well. The more I use it the more I like it. I hope the mill that I ordered from Precision Mathews is just as nice. If that is the case I will be one happy camper. That it is IF I ever get it.:dunno:

That's funny about the savings fund. I called mine my "slush fund". I put 10% from every paying job into an envelope around the first of 2013 when I started looking at upgrading. By the first part of 2014 when I decided to stop looking for used equipment and go with new, I had well over half of the investment saved up. It was a lot easier to convince the wife at that point.

Mike.
 

n3480h

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Rebuilding a 2 seat go kart for the grandkids. The OEM had used 20 half inch nuts as spacers for the sprocket and brake drum - unacceptable, and not very attractive. So today I turned new spacers in 1" 6061. Also turned engine standoffs from the same material to provide more distance from the centrifugal clutch sprocket to the new 80 tooth axle sprocket. I am converting from the old band brake to hydraulic disk, so I milled the teeth off the old worn out sprocket that was on the kart when I bought it - it is now a brake disk. Tomorrow I will make brackets to mount the hydraulic system.

Tom


Brakedisk2.jpg

Brakedisk2.jpg
 

drs23

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Rebuilding a 2 seat go kart for the grandkids. The OEM had used 20 half inch nuts as spacers for the sprocket and brake drum - unacceptable, and not very attractive. So today I turned new spacers in 1" 6061. Also turned engine standoffs from the same material to provide more distance from the centrifugal clutch sprocket to the new 80 tooth axle sprocket. I am converting from the old band brake to hydraulic disk, so I milled the teeth off the old worn out sprocket that was on the kart when I bought it - it is now a brake disk. Tomorrow I will make brackets to mount the hydraulic system.

Tom


View attachment 82262
Neat project for your grandkids. Thanks for keeping us posted.
 

zmotorsports

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I had an odd job come into the shop last night. I absolutely hate working on boats, I despise them and don't like them. In case anyone didn't get that, I HATE boats.

That said, I had a very good client call me to fix a hole in his boat. He decided to tackle a restoration and after gutting the boat he noticed a hole in the bottom. My first instinct was to tell him to take it somewhere else but like I said, he is a good client and I work on pretty much everything he owns, from his wife's Escalade to is lawnmower, snowblower, weedeater to his Harley and sandrail.

When he dropped it off I thought what the hell have I gotten myself in to. But that was quickly displaced when I saw that the thing was gutted and that I could simply lift the boat and trailer as a unit on the lift and stand underneath to repair/weld.

Turned out great and all in all was only about an hour job.

Mike.

Here is a picture of it on the lift, thought if I didn't take a picture of it people wouldn't believe me.
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johnnyc14

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I got this push type knurling tool with my quick change tool post set and have never used it as I have a better pinch type knurling tool. I decided to make a regular tool holder from it.

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I cut off the ears that held the knurling wheels with my band saw.

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Then I milled that end flat.

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Then I extended the tool slot the full length of the tool in the mill and drilled and tapped 2 more holes for set screws.

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I hate to see a tool wasted and I can always use more tool holders.
 
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drs23

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I think I'm gonna head to the shop and Monkey See, Monkey Do. I just happen to have two of those in the bottom of my tool cabinet.

Thanks for the idear.
 

johnnyc14

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I took inspration from Mikes new lathe and the tools holder rack he made and spent the day cleaning my machine and welding up a rack for tool holders from 3/16" by 1.5" flat steel pieces.

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I almost hate to use the lathe now that it is so clean.:rofl:
 

zmotorsports

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I took inspration from Mikes new lathe and the tools holder rack he made and spent the day cleaning my machine and welding up a rack for tool holders from 3/16" by 1.5" flat steel pieces.

P8220272_zpsb0f5a579.jpg

P8220271_zps71b8ee84.jpg

P8220273_zps3cc5ad74.jpg

I almost hate to use the lathe now that it is so clean.:rofl:
Lathe looks awesome Johnny. Great job. I love looking at people's lathes and mills. That doesn't make me weird or anything does it?:nuts:

Nice idea on the knurling toolholder as well. I may have to copy that one as I don't care for that style of knurling tool and I have one kicking around somewhere.

Mike.
 

Chucketn

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I got this push type knurling tool with my quick change tool post set and have never used it as I have a better pinch type knurling tool. I decided to make a regular tool holder from it.

I cut off the ears that held the knurling wheels with my band saw.

Then I milled that end flat.

Then I extended the tool slot the full length of the tool in the mill and drilled and tapped 2 more holes for set screws.

I hate to see a tool wasted and I can always use more tool holders.
Great idea! I have one of those knurlers also. I had it set up with a turning tool and realized the radiused end of the tool slot was effecting the way the tool was positioned. I will indeed copy your inspiration.
Thanks for sharing your ideas!

Chuck
 
D

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I had started to build a steady rest for my South bend lathe a while back and decided to get after it today. I wanted one with the telescoping fingers as opposed to the cheapie sliding fingers. Originals when you find them cost arm and a leg. Mine will cost me about 40 bucks when done. I started by making the body from a solid chunk of steel round 7 1/4" diameter and 2" long. It maxed out the 9" lathe. I had to do some creative rigging to get a tool out that far. The body is all roughed out and I am working on the fingers now. When done it will get all polished up. The factory ones had a 3" center hole. Mine is 3 1/2".


Mark


bottom of steady rest - Copy.jpgclamp plate for steady rest - Copy.jpgknob and screws for steady rest - Copy.jpgroughed out steady rest 2 - Copy.jpgroughed out steady rest assembly.jpgroughed out steady rest.jpgstarting to bore center hole in steady rest - Copy.jpgsteady rest fit to lathe - Copy.jpg

bottom of steady rest - Copy.jpg clamp plate for steady rest - Copy.jpg knob and screws for steady rest - Copy.jpg roughed out steady rest 2 - Copy.jpg roughed out steady rest assembly.jpg roughed out steady rest.jpg starting to bore center hole in steady rest - Copy.jpg steady rest fit to lathe - Copy.jpg
 

GarageGuy

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Wow! To say it is "heavy duty" would be an understatement. It looks great! Beautiful work.

GG
 
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RWL

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I had started to build a steady rest for my South bend lathe a while back and decided to get after it today. I wanted one with the telescoping fingers as opposed to the cheapie sliding fingers.
Mark
Can you show us some photos of the construction of the telescoping fingers and or give a description of how they're made?
 
D

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Can you show us some photos of the construction of the telescoping fingers and or give a description of how they're made?
STEADY6-1.jpg
As I complete the fingers I will take photos. The brass fingers have a left hand thread in them as does the screw has a left hand thread. The knob and sleeve have a right hand thread, so as you turn the knob the fingers move also giving a faster and longer travel. This picture should explain.



Mark

STEADY6-1.jpg
 

Carlos SA

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Spent some more time on my foundry project today. The molds are coming together nicely.
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The other week I made a captive bolt puzzle, I showed it to the local mechanic and got my first paid machine work. I'm very pleased!
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JimDawson

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I finally pretty much lost the brakes on my small forklift, so I thought I better take a look. I haven't touched them in the 7 years I've owned her. Turns out they were just out of adjustment but had a pretty good ridge outboard of where the linings touched, and I had a heck of a time loosening the adjusters to get the drums off. Squirting enough PB Blaster in the hole finally allowed me to get them loose.

I needed to get rid of the ridge, and they are about 3/4 inch too big to fit in my lathe. I thought about taking them down to the local auto parts store and having them turned, but then I would have had to argue with the snot-nosed kid behind the counter about how much they could turn and still be ''legal''. OK so they are worn about 0.080, but this machine has probably a total of about 10 miles on her since I've owned her. The major road trip was across the street to the neighbors, to lift a pallet of shingles up to the roof for them. A normal trip is maybe 30 feet at a blazing 1/2 MPH or less.

OK, I have a CNC mill sitting here that can be used as a brake drum lathe. In this case I just programmed in a circle and took 0.010 DOC per pass until I got down to the worn area. I could have used the rotary table but I was too lazy to set it up, besides, I would have had to hand crank it. This allowed me to clean and repack the wheel bearings while I was ''turning'' the drums.
IMG_0268.jpg

When I got to the right wheel, I found the bearing adjusting nut was loose, backed off about 2 full turns and the lock tab was missing. The mental giant that last worked on it didn't put the lock tab back in and to top it off, cleaned the bearings and then didn't repack them with grease, completely dry.:*****slap2: I guess I'm lucky I'm not road racing her.

So I made a new lock tab and life is good. And the brakes work just like (almost) new. Maybe I'll have to adjust them again in another 7 years.
IMG_0270.jpg

IMG_0270.jpg IMG_0268.jpg
 
D

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Today I made a hand tapping head for my lathe. It holds 1 1/2” dies and I made an adapter ring to also hold 1” dies. I am going to make another adapter to hold hex dies. It has 4 holes around it for a 1/2” tommy bar for leverage on bigger threads.
Mark

hand tapping head 2.jpghand tapping head for lathe.jpg

hand tapping head 2.jpg hand tapping head for lathe.jpg
 

Cheeseking

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Bought a new 2hp motor for the lathe this week. Could have just put new bearings in the old one but wth I decided to give a new automation direct Ironhorse motor a try. Had to flip flop the rotor and electrical housing to fit like the original. Only hard part so far was pulling the cheap little plastic fan off the back end w/o breaking it. Had to remove the splash guard and brake mechanism to get at the mounting bolts also. Not a big deal but the simple motor swap is ending up more of a project than anticipated. Oh well fun in the shop any way you slice it.

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RWL

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Bought a new 2hp motor for the lathe this week. Could have just put new bearings in the old one but wth I decided to give a new automation direct Ironhorse motor a try.
Bearing replacement is so much less expensive than a new motor that it's unusual that you didn't do that. Was there some advantage of the new motor over the old one?
 

Whyemier

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Spent some time with the new (to me) lathe getting to know it. I machined these two items, nothing big or complicated, just a couple of knurled brass knobs. One for the 'lock' on the gear cover the other for the carriage lock. I press fit a socket head cap screw into the knobs. This way I don't have to look for my allen wrench every time I want to lock/unlock them but can use the allen wrench if I need to for some reason. The knurling on the first was not what it should be but the knurl on the second worked better.

lock005.JPGlock003.JPG

lock003.JPG lock005.JPG
 

zmotorsports

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Spent some time with the new (to me) lathe getting to know it. I machined these two items, nothing big or complicated, just a couple of knurled brass knobs. One for the 'lock' on the gear cover the other for the carriage lock. I press fit a socket head cap screw into the knobs. This way I don't have to look for my allen wrench every time I want to lock/unlock them but can use the allen wrench if I need to for some reason. The knurling on the first was not what it should be but the knurl on the second worked better.
That is the best way to practice, plus it gives you some alone time with it to get to know it.:whistle:

Nice job.

Mike.
 

zmotorsports

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Friday night I had a client come by the shop and drop of some measurements to me for a suspension end that he needed machined. He called me a couple of weeks ago asking my opinion after he hit a rock and damaged the suspension link. I told him to get me some measurements and I could turn him a new end then just cut the damaged one off and weld the new one on, no big deal.


Well wouldn't you know it that he waits until he needs it right away rather then get me the dimensions and let me fit it into the workload. He absolutely had to have it by Saturday so he could repair the link and get it back under the buggy so he could go on a run Sunday with his Jeep club. He didn't get my sarcasm Friday night when he dropped it off and I asked him why give me so much time, if you didn't need it until tomorrow, why didn't you wait until tomorrow to get me the measurements?


Anyway, Saturday morning I hurried and knocked out the part for him.


I didn't have any 2" OD thick walled tubing to I started with a piece of 2" round stock and bored out the ID. Drilled out to 1" with drill bit before starting with the boring bar.
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I wanted a pretty snug fit so I shot for the exact measurement of the bushing. Once I got close I broke out the snap gauges and micrometer.
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It needed a snap ring groove on either end to hold the bushing in. I reached for my snap-ring assortment and measured the thickness so I knew how wide to make the HSS tool.
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Ground the HSS tool to a few thousandths over the thickness.
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I like to hone or stone the cutting edges a little.
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Completed tool and ready to go to work.
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Measured in the proper depth and cut the snap ring groove.
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Turn the part around in the chuck and face off to the proper length.
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Knock the edge off and chamfer the outside.
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Chamfer the inside by running the lathe in reverse.
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And here is the completed part ready for him to pick up.
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His notes or measurements were just scribbled down on an old envelope. Prior to starting I drew them out as drawings with measurements make it easier for me to follow. Plus I like to keep the drawings just in case I need to machine another.
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All in all about an hour and a half job and hopefully he was happy. I tried to express the importance of not waiting until the last minute but I still don't think he got it. I am sure the next job will be a "rush" job as well.


Mike.

- - - Updated - - -

I noticed the other day when I rode my bike to work that I was missing a screw holding the small visor on my helmet. I stopped by the Harley shop and they had to order the fasteners and they were not cheap. I decided what the hell, I will just machine some new ones and replace all three, this will give me two spares for the wife's helmet in case she ever loses one.


Here is a quick little drawing I made up. The original ones were plastic but I thought I would make them out of aluminum.
s3hbio.jpg


Faced off a piece of .5" aluminum round stock.
20joi2x.jpg


I have never single point threaded anything this small but I decided to give it a try vs. using a die. I like to mark the area with a Sharpie for my scratch pass, makes it easier for me to see and to ensure the thread pitch is correct before continuing.
oj3v6f.jpg


After scratch pass, yep 28 threads per inch.
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Completed one next to the OEM one. One down, two to go. Originally I was going to knurl them but the finish turned out so nice I opted not to.
o0p8b5.jpg


All three completed and installed. I added a little Loctite to these ones so hopefully I won't lose any of them.
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Mike.
 

John Hasler

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The way to express the importance of not waiting until the last minute is with a rush fee.
 
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