Potd - Project Of The Day- What Did You Do In Your Shop Today?

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blaser.306

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Made and installed a replacement muzzle brake on a 375 Winchester 14" contender barrel. The brake itself is made from forged 4140 steel ( heavy truck air brake camshaft ) Then blackened with Caswells black oxide kit. The flash really seems to cut thru the black oxide as it is much nicer in person! The end of the BBL. is threaded 11/16-24 tpi ( not out of convenience ) it left me extra "meat" on the outside chance something went south!!! An were forced to re cut and thread to the next smaller size. Please escuse the dog hair that appear as a scratch or two! And to answer the next question, it isn't as heavy and bulky as it appears! Now I just wish it wasn't 40 below 0 with the wind today! I would like to get out and fire it a few times to see how it works! Happy new year all!
It was finally warm enough outside to get out to the range and try the muzzle brake. Not that I expected anything else, but with full power rifle loads ( 375 Winchester ) there was only aprox. 1 1/2" of climb Very happy to say the least.
 

Vince_O

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Ok another repair, or clean up what ever you want to call it. My short block came in for the welder this week and my old boss came over and helped me with it, more I think just to hang out and talk about old tractors. Anyway he said his brother would just shave the slip rings in his lathe. Ok Im game! Now my dead center was too small to turn between so I had to take the old crank and bolt togeather and run it that way. I had a small amount of chatter on one of the rings, took it out with some 600 grit wet dry paper. Next time I come up on this, Ill just use sand paper.

Im learning, getting more secure cause of the stuff I see here and the help folks give behind the seens, THANKS!

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MattM

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Today's the day...

Yesterday the leather belt arrived from Al Bino, all 10' 3" of it for my camelback. Job one this morning is to strap it on and fire up the fully restored old beast.

Pictures to follow
 

Jimbo

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I use a lot of small diameter stock that comes in 3 foot lengths, that being said I had to clamp it at the exit of my spindle to keep it from whipping. First try was a three bolt arrangement that worked but was slow to adjust and I did not like the bolts sticking out and spinning. So I saw an iris device on a Cnccookbook email and modified it to this. It is thicker than it needed but I had 1/2 in pieces in my scrap box. Now I can loosen the one thumb screw, give it a twist and it self centers to any stock. IMG_0526.JPG IMG_0528.JPG

IMG_0526.JPG IMG_0528.JPG
 

David Kirtley

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I use a lot of small diameter stock that comes in 3 foot lengths, that being said I had to clamp it at the exit of my spindle to keep it from whipping. First try was a three bolt arrangement that worked but was slow to adjust and I did not like the bolts sticking out and spinning. So I saw an iris device on a Cnccookbook email and modified it to this. It is thicker than it needed but I had 1/2 in pieces in my scrap box. Now I can loosen the one thumb screw, give it a twist and it self centers to any stock
That, Sir, is quite sexy. First one I have seen using that mechanism.
 

CoopVA

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Rebuilt an old air compressor pump I picked up on Craig's List along with a 60 gallon air tank...

Before

ImageUploadedByTapatalk1421622758.349451.jpg

ImageUploadedByTapatalk1421622782.928228.jpg

After

ImageUploadedByTapatalk1421622807.765917.jpg

ImageUploadedByTapatalk1421622828.192546.jpg


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk

ImageUploadedByTapatalk1421622758.349451.jpg ImageUploadedByTapatalk1421622782.928228.jpg ImageUploadedByTapatalk1421622807.765917.jpg ImageUploadedByTapatalk1421622828.192546.jpg
 

Smudgemo

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I needed a new chuck key for my four-jaw chuck, so I made one. Next step is heat treating.

Chuck Key.jpg

-Ryan

Chuck Key.jpg
 

RWL

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I needed a new chuck key for my four-jaw chuck, so I made one. Next step is heat treating.

-Ryan
I never heat treated the couple that I've made. Are they hardened as they come from manufacturers?
 

RandyM

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I use a lot of small diameter stock that comes in 3 foot lengths, that being said I had to clamp it at the exit of my spindle to keep it from whipping. First try was a three bolt arrangement that worked but was slow to adjust and I did not like the bolts sticking out and spinning. So I saw an iris device on a Cnccookbook email and modified it to this. It is thicker than it needed but I had 1/2 in pieces in my scrap box. Now I can loosen the one thumb screw, give it a twist and it self centers to any stock.
Yeah, we need way more detail on this. :rubbinghands:
 

cathead

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Weekend POTD : V-Block and Clamps

Here's a photo of my weekend project. I couldn't decide if I should cut it in half and
make 2 V Blocks so opted for not cutting it for now. The V part is made from one
inch square stock and the clamp part was 1.5 x 1/2 stock. It will hold shafts from
1/8 inch to a full inch so will be handy for smaller projects.


Also the clamps could double for machinist's jacks in a pinch.

IMG_0517.JPG
 
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12bolts

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Nice work.
Did you just use a square endmill at 45* to cut the vee grooves? And what sort of steel did you use?

Cheers Phil
 

cathead

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Phil,

It's just some hot rolled mild steel. I didn't want to nod the head on the mill just for
this project so I used another V block to hold the square stock in the vise at a 45. The
cutter for the V was a half inch end mill and I used a 1/4 inch end mill for the
clamp grooves.


Nice work.
Did you just use a square endmill at 45* to cut the vee grooves? And what sort of steel did you use?

Cheers Phil
 

joshua43214

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I Went to make sure the mini-crane I built to move boulders around was still working and the tires had air today in preparation for my new lathe coming soon. When I tried to fill the tires, found I was not getting any air. Investigating further, I found the compressor on my 5hp rig was frozen.
I check the oil, seems fine. Take the belts off, and wrestle the thing onto the bench and take it apart. When I drained the oil, about a half quart of water came out before the oil started to flow :(
Rod bearing for the little piston was seized up.
Checked the price on a replacement, upwards $1,000.00! I only paid about $300.00 for it used twenty years ago. It is way more compressor than I need.
So I broke the bearing free, wiped out the innards, and put it all back together, drained the tank (was almost no water in it), and fired it back up. I figured the worst that could happen is that I would have a nice 5hp motor to play with, a few hundred pounds of cast iron to machine into whatevers.
Runs loader now than before, but it still pumped right up to 150psi in no time.

I'm 6' 5", I'm standing on the box I used to lift it back up onto the tank (hard on an aging back..). Have to wait for my son to come around to shoehorn it back into the corner.

You can see the goop in the sight glass, and just make out the center dot.
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Jimbo

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For a little more info. I attach the iris with a split collar arrangement and you can see the inner workings of the iris. Yes there are two shutters that need to be re-milled. I was getting ahead of myself and did not leave enough clearance between parts and the cnc gave me what I asked for.

Jim B

IMG_0529.JPG IMG_0531.JPG
 

nightowl499

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Re: Weekend POTD : V-Block and Clamps

Here's a photo of my weekend project. I couldn't decide if I should cut it in half and
make 2 V Blocks so opted for not cutting it for now. The V part is made from one
inch square stock and the clamp part was 1.5 x 1/2 stock. It will hold shafts from
1/8 inch to a full inch so will be handy for smaller projects.
nice job
 

tazza

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Halligan - good to see you around these parts. I enjoyed your videos on AC work then found your ones on machining, keep up the good work. The screw jacks look good, i should may myself a set one day. The fun of so many projects, not enough time.
 

T Bredehoft

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In the late ‘60s, working in the boat factory, a repair job came in, the owner wanted something done. Our crew went inside and got to work. I spotted a neat little oriental table, took it into the shop and drew it off. I figured with time I ought to be able to duplicate it. It had four legs, the details of which were continued in the top rail, and the four sides were cut out in an interlocking design. I recorded all the dimensions and traced the cut out design on a piece of brown wrapping paper.

Fast forward 50 years.

I found the brown paper and realized that if I was ever going to build the table I’d better start. I had accumulated a fair stock of mahogany, so I cut out all the parts and got busy on the skirt details. I drilled through all the open spaces and did what cutting I could with a sabre saw mounted upside down in a vise. I probably put in six or eight weeks carving and sanding the skirts. In the process I stumbled upon a biscuit cutter in an auction and added that to my tool supply. Great for joining the legs to the skirts and the top itself, I couldn’t make the top from one board, too wide, so I’d have to glue it up.

The leg detail was simplicity itself. The legs were 1” square, with a bead on the outer corner, and the surface beside the bead was faired from the bottom of the bead into the side.

I puzzled on how to duplicate this without carving the whole thing, use the table saw at a slight angle and sand forever…. Was the best I had come up with.

For no good reason, one night, awaiting sleep, I was remembering projects done in the past, one, a roll top desk that needed a couple of segment, I had made a pair of router bits to form. Couldn’t I make a router bit to cut the profile for the table legs? Sure, why not.

I found a piece of ½ O1 steel, turned one end down to .250 turned ½” length on the other end to .390 and filed the profile to make the detail. The turret lathe I have doesn’t have profiling capability.

I puzzled a while on how to hold it for fluting, then came up with a pair of clamps, each with the diameter suited for its end. A short piece of ½ by 1 CRS caught my eye, I drilled two holes in it and a little hacksawing and milling (for parallel) and I had my clamps.

I’m cutting the flutes .150 deep from first touch, this will leave .200 in the center. I’ve found I have to take care to leave the cutting edge on the proper side of the cutter.

Two weeks later.

I’ve made two of the cutters, they cut OK, but aren’t deep enough. The relief between the ½ inch stock diameter and the .375 bearing, (.062) just isn’t enough to develop the profile I want. I’m going to have to find some larger diameter O1 stock.

Yesterday I finished the third iteration, used 5/8 O1, milled the flutes, hardened, drew it back and sharpened it. I made a dummy leg from a piece of scrap, tapered it and after so many years of waiting to figure out how to do the profile, I’m now ready to go.
Final router bit and product small.jpg

Final router bit and product small.jpg
 

zmotorsports

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Last night I finished up my new power drawbar for my milling machine. I fabricated one when I first got my new mill but I saw one that a guy (Collin @ Comp Edge X) fabricated and really liked his design, so I copied it somewhat. I liked his design because it was so much more compact as he used the air cylinder in the "pull" fashion rather than "push" so I was able to keep the overall height much less. I also went and machined some of the brass fittings rather than used over the counter ones purchased from my local hardware store.
Here are my preliminary drawings for the base plate and top plate along with all of the ports and screw holes for the butterfly air gun.
212vm29.jpg
14muype.jpg
Top plate roughly layed out. I will get exact once I put it on my mill table and indicate off measurements exactly using the DRO.
2vun5f7.jpg
Top plate machined to size and drilled/tapped for the butterfly air ratchet.
2430ytw.jpg
Bottom plate machined to size and drilled for the mounting location as well as the holes drilled and countersunk for the vertical guide rods. Also pictured are the guide rods.
sxm986.jpg
Guide rods mocked into position. Bronze and brass in the background to be used for the bushings and the "tees" for the fittings.
20k7jmg.jpg
Completed unit and bolted on the mill. Looks and works awesome.
245y2xi.jpg

212vm29.jpg

212vm29.jpg

14muype.jpg

14muype.jpg

2vun5f7.jpg

2vun5f7.jpg

2430ytw.jpg

2430ytw.jpg

sxm986.jpg

sxm986.jpg

20k7jmg.jpg

20k7jmg.jpg

245y2xi.jpg

245y2xi.jpg
 

melsdad

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Last night I finished up my new power drawbar for my milling machine. I fabricated one when I first got my new mill but I saw one that a guy (Collin @ Comp Edge X) fabricated and really liked his design, so I copied it somewhat. I liked his design because it was so much more compact as he used the air cylinder in the "pull" fashion rather than "push" so I was able to keep the overall height much less. I also went and machined some of the brass fittings rather than used over the counter ones purchased from my local hardware store.
Here are my preliminary drawings for the base plate and top plate along with all of the ports and screw holes for the butterfly air gun.
212vm29.jpg
14muype.jpg
Top plate roughly layed out. I will get exact once I put it on my mill table and indicate off measurements exactly using the DRO.
2vun5f7.jpg
Top plate machined to size and drilled/tapped for the butterfly air ratchet.
2430ytw.jpg
Bottom plate machined to size and drilled for the mounting location as well as the holes drilled and countersunk for the vertical guide rods. Also pictured are the guide rods.
sxm986.jpg
Guide rods mocked into position. Bronze and brass in the background to be used for the bushings and the "tees" for the fittings.
20k7jmg.jpg
Completed unit and bolted on the mill. Looks and works awesome.
245y2xi.jpg
That is one of the nicest home built units I have ever seen!

212vm29.jpg

212vm29.jpg

14muype.jpg

14muype.jpg

2vun5f7.jpg

2vun5f7.jpg

2430ytw.jpg

2430ytw.jpg

sxm986.jpg

sxm986.jpg

20k7jmg.jpg

20k7jmg.jpg

245y2xi.jpg

245y2xi.jpg
 

zmotorsports

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Thank you.

However, I can't take all the credit. A guy on youtube (Colling @ CompEdgeX) gave me the idea. I really liked the style/design better than my original, although my original one worked just fine.
 

Tompdw

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Cut up some deer antler that was given to me so I can use it for a handle on my next knife.
 

ronboley

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Today I tried to solve a problem that has long plagued me and probably many dirt bike or ATV owners. Problem comes when you try to use the bike after a long set, or to mothball the machine for the winter or summer (or longer) as the case may be. One important step is to drain the gas tank AND the carburetor bowl of all gasoline as it will no doubt gel-up and require at least a carburetor disassembly and cleaning next go-round. I've tried Sta-Bil gas stabilizer and others, but with no success. So draining the tank is straight forward enough. Disconnect the gas hose and drain into a gas can for disposal or use elsewhere. Most all dirt bikes and ATVs have a drain plug in the side of the bottom bowl of the carburetor. This drain plug usually is gummed up or corroded so removing it is inserting a flat or Phillips screwdriver into the head of the drain screw and immediately stripping out the slot or cross of the screw head. Many have the head of the screw in a recess in the aluminum float bowl so removal is then to remove the carb, remove the float bowl, drill the head of the screw, use a screw extractor, replace the drain screw with a new one (last one cost $26 for two) reinstall the carb.

The solution to the problem I believe is to have a drain screw that can be installed and removed without the use of a screwdriver. So since I own 11 dirt bikes and ATVs, I thought it was worth a try to make something better than the factory drain screw that has been on virtually every dirt bike and ATV since their inception. Also while experiencing this annual problem on one of the ATVs (away from my home shop), the screw head stripped, the screw extractor broke off in the drilled drain screw and the float bowl received pin hole damage from an errant drill bit. So while contemplating the cost of a new (old) carburetor and problem of finding such a thing for for a 15 year old ATV I decided to weld the sucker up, machine out the drain screw and broken screw extractor parts and make a new drain screw that would hopefully work better.

Back at my home shop, this is what I came up with. My vintage 1968 Honda Mini Trail has a knurled end drain screw that was intended (with fold down handlebars and a gas cap shut off) to make it portable in the trunk of your car. So not original but this is it. Like I said I have 11 bikes and ATVs, and they take 3 different drain screws.

IMG_0930.JPG IMG_0927.JPG
 

extropic

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I hope your new drain screws work well for you. I would also recommend using some anti-seize compound when installing those screws. I wonder if corrosion/seizing was the root cause of the problem.
 

dracozny

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I always just used a higher concentration Seafoam in the tank when storing. Never had a problem the following season.
 

zmotorsports

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Started construction of my new 6'x10' utility trailer last night while I have a gap in paying jobs coming into the shop.

Here is the chassis jig setup, bolted together and leveled.
14tsi1c.jpg

2"x3" tube laid out on the jig.
26451zs.jpg

I got all of the perimeter pieces mitered at 45-degree angles and ready to remove the mill scale and weld together.
15zfadl.jpg

More to follow as progress continues.

14tsi1c.jpg

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15zfadl.jpg

14tsi1c.jpg

26451zs.jpg

15zfadl.jpg
 

autonoz

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Made a few Harley seat mount buttons. Not really a big deal. The cool part for me was powder coating for the first time. Turned out really nice and was surprisingly easy.

harleyseatbolt.JPG
 

davidh

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i have a handful of odd shaped carbide inserts that appear to snap into some type of holder. i thought i would like to see how well they cut with my 12" craftsman lathe so i took a old china tool stock, the kind with brazed carbides that are cheap, and milled an area to hold the new bit, drilled and tapped a 6-40 hole for a clamp i made out of a small chunk of m.s. and put it in the lathe and tried to cut the threads off a 1/2" grade 5 bolt. no reason, just wanted to try it. well, as the tool was traveling down the threads and taking them off, i could see the tip of the tool flexing up and down. crap, i think i did;t leave enough metal to support the tool, and of course, taking a light cut with carbide is not really pretty either. i probably should stick with has or cobalt and just keep grinding as needed. . .
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