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POTD- PROJECT OF THE DAY: What Did You Make In Your Shop Today?

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Shootymacshootface

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Thanks! It is now.
I thought that I was going to lose my shirt on this one. There is a guy about 7 miles from me that buys and sells used tools. He's a great guy, I didn't even tell him that the 216 had a problem. I'm sure that he didn't know.
 

francist

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Clean and shiny blade guides are always exciting......
 

SubtleHustle

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Ps. I'm just making up names of these things. Never messed with a vertical bandsaw before. So if I sound ignorant, it's because I am!
 

GoceKU

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Today i had some time to spare so i continue on the trunk lid for the Little Lada, first i wipe off the remainings from the anti rust acid with paint thinner waited for it to dry and then used machinist square and rulers to mark the rusted parts, i marked the bare minimum material to cut off to have less body work to do. Drivers side had 4 small holes to cut out witch i had to be very careful not to cut all the way thru, the passenger side had so much rust that i cut the entire side inside and out. I'll need to figure out a way to make couple sharp bends to recreate the inner and outer sheet metal pieces. Last thing i did was to give all the areas a pass with a wire brush and a flapper disc and spray some more anti rust acid.
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BGHansen

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I did a POTD back in May to make a drill fixture for reworking a part at our car assembly plant. Part of the fixture was a couple of hardened steel drill bushings. Well, they’ve been in use for over 6 months at 250 holes per day, or around 50,000 cycles. Finally seeing a little wear in them so remade them today.

Chucked up some 1” drill rod, faced, and turned a shoulder at 0.625” diameter 0.875” long. I used a grooving tool to cut some ridges in the outside of the bushing. These will be Loctited into an aluminum holding fixture, think the grooves will help the Loctite get a better grip.

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Cut off the bushing on a band saw. Could have parted on the lathe, but with drill rod I usually go the saw route.

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Re-chucked with the rough side out and faced. Center drilled, and drilled a ¼” through hole. The final size would be about 0.006” over 12 mm which is slightly over a 15/32” drill. Ran a 15/32” drill bit through which was 0.004” under 12 mm. Finished drilling with a 12 mm drill, then bored to about 0.006” oversize.

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The drill fixture is used to knock holes through a plastic part, so we are using a brad point drill bit. I put a little taper on the first 0.15” of the hole with a 2MT ream, then countersunk the hole.

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On to heat treating. I picked up a 110V Thermolyne 2025 muffle furnace (anyone know why they call them a muffle furnace? If I was to hazard a guess, there isn’t any forced air so maybe the sound is muffled?) and used that to heat the bushings to 1500 F. The “book” says steel goes to Austenite at 1350F, take it to 1450 to 1500F to completely take it to Austenite. Steel was quenched in motor oil which as expected caught fire. I keep a piece of sheet metal handy to drop over the can and snuff out the flames.

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As an aside, the Thermolyne took 30 minutes to get to 1500F, so might go back to flame hardening with the oxyacetylene torch which takes under a minute to get to temp, then hold for 5 minutes more.

Cleaned up most of the scale with a Scotch-brite wheel on a bench grinder. Those wheels can be pretty pricey, but they do a wonderful job deburring, derusting and general cleanup.

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Thanks for looking.

Bruce
 

rwm

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Thanks for sharing this professional work! Do you temper these or just use full hard?
Robert
 

BGHansen

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Thanks for sharing this professional work! Do you temper these or just use full hard?
Robert
Hi Robert,

Thanks for the comments. I left them full hard. They shouldn't take any impact, just scraping on the inside diameter from a drill bit. The first set lasted over 50,000 cycles so pretty happy with the end result.

Bruce
 

rwm

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I never though about making my own drill guides...until now :cool:

Robert
 

RJSakowski

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I did a POTD back in May to make a drill fixture for reworking a part at our car assembly plant. Part of the fixture was a couple of hardened steel drill bushings. Well, they’ve been in use for over 6 months at 250 holes per day, or around 50,000 cycles. Finally seeing a little wear in them so remade them today.

Chucked up some 1” drill rod, faced, and turned a shoulder at 0.625” diameter 0.875” long. I used a grooving tool to cut some ridges in the outside of the bushing. These will be Loctited into an aluminum holding fixture, think the grooves will help the Loctite get a better grip.

View attachment 281929
View attachment 281930
View attachment 281931

Cut off the bushing on a band saw. Could have parted on the lathe, but with drill rod I usually go the saw route.

View attachment 281932

Re-chucked with the rough side out and faced. Center drilled, and drilled a ¼” through hole. The final size would be about 0.006” over 12 mm which is slightly over a 15/32” drill. Ran a 15/32” drill bit through which was 0.004” under 12 mm. Finished drilling with a 12 mm drill, then bored to about 0.006” oversize.

View attachment 281933
View attachment 281934
View attachment 281935

The drill fixture is used to knock holes through a plastic part, so we are using a brad point drill bit. I put a little taper on the first 0.15” of the hole with a 2MT ream, then countersunk the hole.

View attachment 281936
View attachment 281937

On to heat treating. I picked up a 110V Thermolyne 2025 muffle furnace (anyone know why they call them a muffle furnace? If I was to hazard a guess, there isn’t any forced air so maybe the sound is muffled?) and used that to heat the bushings to 1500 F.
Bruce
A muffle is a receptacle in a furnace or kiln in which things can be heated without contact with combustion products. Although most muffle furnaces are electrically heated, at one time, they were fired with petroleum products.
 

BGHansen

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I never though about making my own drill guides...until now :cool:

Robert
Hi Robert,

Naturally, depending on the project they can save a lot of time. Look at some of my posts for Erector set parts. One in particular is part# DT one-hole coupling. My competition and I used to make them the same way. Chuck up some 5/16" brass, center drill and drill an ~0.550 deep 11/64" hole in the end. Then part to length. Flip the part and file a dome/radius on the end. Then to the bench for some layout work for an 11/64" cross hole and a 6-32 tapped hole 90 deg. from the cross hole. We could make 4 to 5 an hole, sold all we could make for $7 each.

I now chuck up the 5/16" brass but don't center drill before doing the ~0.550" deep 11/64" hole. Instead, I slip a drill bushing over the brass rod, bushing has an 11/64" hole through the center which holds the drill bit on center. Saved a tooling change step. Then I slip another hardened drill bushing over the 5/16" rod which has a guide for both the 11/64" cross hole and the 6-32 tap hole. Do the 11/64" first with a 110V hand drill and pin the bushing in place with the shank of a drill bit. Rotate the lathe chuck 90 deg. and drill the 6-32 tap hole with a cordless. Pull the pin, remove the drill bushing. Power tap the 6-32 hole with a second cordless drill. The drill bushing is cut to the length of the part, made a parting tool which has the end dome profile on it, so position the parting tool based on the drill bushing and part. Clean up the nib on the end with a Scotch-brite disk on a bench grinder. Now comfortably make 22-25 per hour.

Bruce
 
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BGHansen

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A muffle is a receptacle in a furnace or kiln in which things can be heated without contact with combustion products. Although most muffle furnaces are electrically heated, at one time, they were fired with petroleum products.
Thanks RJ!
 

dave_r_1

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Added a light to my plow, and modified the bracket holding the winch switch (which lifts/lowers the plow) and now the light on/off switch so that it can be more easily removed when the plow is removed from the drive unit and replaced with the mower front-end (as the winch switch and wiring harness was damaged this summer while I was mowing with it, so now I'll remove it from the unit).

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Also fixed up some of the lights on my trailer. I had got them all working, but some of the wires were hanging down and exposed to spray from the tires, and came apart from this, and perhaps from being dragged through snow as well. I fixed the wiring, and bought/installed some body clips to hold the wires up and out of the way.
 

jdedmon91

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Finally got around to making an adjustable cutoff stop for the bandsaw....

View attachment 281958

....after using the saw for almost 15 years without one. :rolleyes:

-frank
I like the stop. My saw has the original stop that came with it. I seen a stop collar on YouTube so I machined a collars.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

francist

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Nice Francist. Which bandsaw is that?
I like the stop. My saw has the original stop that came with it. I seen a stop collar on YouTube so I machined a collars.
Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
Thanks both.
The saw was tagged "Airco", but I'm sure it's the same basic concept as all the other 4x6's around. Older I guess -- I'd put it to the 1970's or so -- if that makes any difference. I tuned a bunch of stuff on it, re-turned the wheels, etc and it's done alright by me so far.

-frank
 

GoceKU

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Today i had very little free time but decided to start machining some parts for the little Niva, i started with a 28mm round piece of 4140 steel, i turn it down to 22,7 mm then i cut an 10 degree taper to the middle of the cross drilled holes and hand rounded the end then i partted it off, i need to make 3 more pieces like this and couple of beefy hinges but unrelated i clean up and centre drilled this casting piece that i need to weld up to shaft. I like making parts like this.
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GoceKU

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Today i continue making the locking tabs and beefy hinges, i run into a problem with my cheap drill press, it drill the pilot hole no problem but 8 mm drill keep spinning the belt, i slow it down to it's slowest speed and tension the belt with a crowbar and still keep spinning, so i used my lathe to drill the rest of the holes, then i finished machining them, then i took them to the big garage and cut a slot up to the drilled hole this would be a lot easier and quicker if i had a mill but i have to use what i have, this took me couple of hours and the plan is to work all thru the night.
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GoceKU

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I continued working late in to the night, trying to finish as much of the welding jobs i can, my work bench in occupied by the trunk lid so to free up my work bench decided to repair the lid that means making new pieces, started with the big inner peace, tried making it from 1.5mm steel but i could not bend it so i grabbed some 1mm cold rolled steel, and managed to make the gradual and constant bends, i trim it to fit and tack weld it in place, this was the easier piece. The outer piece needed a curve, and a overlapped edge at the bottom, i bend it over some big diameter pipe, then started a bend on my hydraulic press, then i put a piece of steel in between and hammer the flange shut, this was quite loud but it come out respectable, i had to spread the edge little to get the piece in between out but it fitted perfectly first time, i also tack welded it in place then i moved to the small square pieces, i used some of the scrap pieces i had left from making the previous panel, i made them all and tack welded them, it become very late so i stopped i'm also considering redoing the gas struts mounts as who ever welded them made a mess.
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hman

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Today i continue making the locking tabs and beefy hinges, i run into a problem with my cheap drill press, it drill the pilot hole no problem but 8 mm drill keep spinning the belt, i slow it down to it's slowest speed and tension the belt with a crowbar and still keep spinning, so i used my lathe to drill the rest of the holes
If there's a music store near you, you can try buying a small cake of violin rosin. It's inexpensive and makes a great anti-slip for belts - just (carefully!) hold it against the vee faces of the belt as it's running. The "real" fix would probably be a new belt, but rosin should get you back in business quickly.
 

francist

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The odds of this helping somebody else is pretty slim I'm thinkin, but I did find it kind of a lucky happenstance. The silver key-hole shaped thing used to be round -- it's actually supposed to be round to work properly. It's been kind of....squished... for lack of a better word.

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I've been killing a few evenings in the shop oiling up a couple of vises that I don't use that often. One of them is a small Columbian #1 leg vise. I could see part of something squeezing out from around the opening where the screw passes through the movable jaw, and although I had a pretty good idea what it was I was still a little stunned when I took it apart.

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The ring is supposed to fit over the screw and butt against the hub when the jaw closes, I think to keep things nicely centred as the jaw hinges open and closed, and also to act as a bit of a wear surface. Well, this one evidently got pinched off-centre at some point and then over the years just got progressively worse and worse. The vise still worked, but now I had the thing apart so what could I do.

As I imagined turning a replacement on the lathe and what material I would have on hand to do that, the similarity to another familiar part became more and more apparent: a compression ring from an ABS plumbing fitting. And sure enough, I just happened to have about three of them in the plumbing parts drawer!

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And there it is, an almost perfect fit right down to the taper angle. Needless to say the action is smooth as silk now with a nice nylon ring in there. How long I'll get out of it, I don't know, but it worth it just to see it fit so perfectly without even trying.

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And the happy couple. Don't mind the body-builder slickness to them -- I'll wipe them down in a day or so. I'm not interested in repainting them, so a liberal coat of oil every now and again keeps any rust at bay. Thanks for looking.

image.jpeg

-frank
 

Franko

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Here is the thing I made.
Its purpose is to position a 3-D camera so it can rotate 360º around the subject's outstretched arm to document upper arm flab.
The client is a skin product testing lab. It is of my design. They told me what it needed to do and I figured out how to do it.

The base is made of Baltic Birch plywood and painted with spray pickumup truck bed coating. That stuff is great. It covers well, needs no priming and is tough as nails.

horizontal_obq_1214.JPG

the original idea was to weld the joints, but I wasn't up to it. It is 16 ga. aluminum square tube. I practiced for hours but couldn't manage two successful welds in a row. I think the problem was the thin edge end of one tube butting against the side of another. The corner made that piece thicker and more of a heat sink. I couldn't get past the difference in thickness. Try as I might, I couldn't make the puddle go down the seams. Hot enough to puddle the side melted the end away.

So, I resorted to plan B, attatch the tubes with joints and hardware. A detail of the noodley elbow joint. This took a long time to make.
All those holes at all those positions and angles were difficult to clamp tight and square, and drill. Clamping and drilling it under the head of the mill was complicated and tedious.

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The hub and counter weights so the arm would balance with the weight of the 3-D camera. It has a disk break and clamp to hold position attached by a T-bushing of delrin-like plastic.

The USB cable from the camera passes through the axle shaft so it won't wrap around the axle.

The hub was equally tedious to make with a flange, section of square tube and two .25 x 2" straps. Welding would have been so much easier and faster. The weights are mounted on an oak angle attached with a 5/8" bolt, fender washers, and 1 inch bushings

break-hub_1216.JPG

This is a detail of the camera mount. A couple of arka clamp mounts so the camera can adjust forward and back, and a Panoramic swivel so it can swivel. It focuses with two laser dots that converge. Upper arms aren't cylindrical or symetrical, so the camera has to move in and out and rotate to compensate and keep the dots in the center of the upper people arms. Each image requires at least 4 images from 4 angles. That's why the 3D camera has to travel around the arms.

The raw camera images are fed into a computer which assembles them to make a virtual arm that can be twisted and turned and viewed from all angles.

IMG_1217.JPG

This project took a week to concept, make plan drawings and complete. I vastly under bid the job and had to live with my estimate.
 
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hman

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Maybe I'm just blowing smoke here, as I'm NOT an experienced welder. But I own a Millermatic MIG welder and have used for several projects. What's always bothered me was that the blanketing gas (CO2) shuts off as soon as you release the trigger. I've always been paranoid that with the gas shut off, the fresh, hot weld can oxidize. So I devised a circuit that would keep the gas valve open a while (0 to 10 seconds) a the end of the weld.

Took a while to figger out how and where to access the various supply voltages and the solenoid valve signal from the main circuit board, then try to develop the timer circuit. Once I had that all squared away (see schematic), I needed a way to physically mount everything so it would stay secure. Also a convenient way to allow (re)setting the timer dial. I used a couple lengths of 10-32 all-thread and a scrap piece of 5/16" Delrin bar, plus a bit of steel bar (possibly overkill) for strength. Milled a pocket in the Delrin for the DPDT relay and secured it with zip ties.
kHPIM5713.jpg
The assembly mounts nicely inside the "rear" case, held by acorn nuts on the "front" side. All connections to the original wiring are by spade lugs. If necessary, the circuit can be removed and the original wiring restored intact.
kHPIM5718.jpg
Here's a look at the "front" side of the case, showing the timer dial and the acorn nuts.
kHPIM5719.jpg
Looking back on the project, I guess the most difficult task was drilling through the center wall of the case WITHOUT getting conductive swarf all over the circuitry. I first drilled three #10 holes, properly spaced, in a piece of scrap steel. Used masking tape to attach swarf catchers (printer paper) to both sides of the wall. Held the steel to the wall with C clamps and used it as a drill guide. Then the big fun - the 1 ⅜" clearance hole for the timer dial. I did that with the largest step drill I had. It was a little bit noisy, but the hole was OK after I'd deburred it. Sure wish I'd had a Greenlee knockout punch!

Anyway, the circuit works as designed. Minor hiccup of gas through the torch when power is first turned on, but I'll call that a feature, not a bug. It guarantees that there's fresh charge of shielding gas in the torch hose, ready for the first weld!

PS - I've done some asking around. Turns out that what I've cobbled up is called "post flow," and is very common with TIG, but also used with larger MIG welders.
 

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extropic

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As pretty much an electronic novice, I very much appreciate your providing a comprehensive schematic of your timer. I could actually replicate that. Thanks for posting.
 

savarin

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The plastic arms on my desk chair broke (I think I lever myself up with them)
I had some scrap aluminium plate so made a very quick pair of braces.
chair.jpg
Now the back does not flex when I sit in it.
The bad part is I have to overcome the habit of falling into it and catching myself with hands on the arms.
 
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