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POTD- PROJECT OF THE DAY: What Did You Make In Your Shop Today?

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GoceKU

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Today i've been working on the smaller things in the big garage, started with a bit of welding, my welder is not meant for thick steel but does get the job done, in fact it overheated on the last weld beed, then i unmasked the engine bay and assemble the clutch and brake reservoirs, had to fix some of the wiring, couple of new connectors and clips. Then i started to prepare for the final assembly of the radiator, i needed to assemble and test the cross over pipe i welded before installing it, so i used couple of hoses clamps and a tire valve to pressure it and sprayed the welds with soapy water and no leaks, after that i had to change the voltage regulator on my brothers car that died couple of days ago so that took the rest of my day.
IMG_20190629_095801.jpgIMG_20190629_095754.jpgIMG_20190628_200007.jpgIMG_20190628_191612.jpg
 

silverhawk

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I finally finished cutting, welding, and painting my stand for the heavy 10 project :





It's a Home Depot Special, meaning ugly 1.25" square tubing with a 1/16" (0.065") wall thickness. The most difficult parts were the kerf cuts on the legs to get the 14 degree angle I wanted for the foot stability and the angled cross braces (the intersection and corners were at odd compound angles and had to be cut specifically to fit).

I know the welds are terrible. I am not a welder. They hold, though, and it was the best I could to do build it back out when I burned through that thin wall tubing. I didn't try to hide the welds in some areas, but you'll see it around down - that was to knock it down enough to not have areas to catch clothing on. I gotta let it set up for a while now before I can drill the mounting holes for the bed and then transfer the project over from the work bench to the stand.
 

Boswell

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With the amount of chemicals and solvents i've breath at all my past jobs this is a walk in the park, but i do take care of myself. What doesn't kill you makes you stronger.
Until it doesn't :oops:
 

mattthemuppet2

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put together my Malelectrics arduino powered battery tab welder that I need to rebuild my bike's battery pack


practising on an old craft knife blade


and on an old li-ion


you can see some lower pulse time spots and the four higher pulse time spots that left the nickel strip behind when I tore it off.

I'll be getting some more practice in over the next few weeks until the new batteries arive.
 

BGHansen

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POTD was crawling in the attic of my shop to string 20A 220 and 110 lines to my new to me Tormach 1100 Series 3. Yes, it's ALIVE! Haven't made any chips yet, have a big learning curve to go through still. My wife is a Unigraphics designer and is pretty adept at SolidWorks too. So I'll start using Solidworks and go to Fusion 360 for the CAM/post processor. Once I get the hang of Solidworks, will probably go to Fusion for the CAD also. Previous owner of this mill was a Fusion user and spoke very highly of it.

First thing after powering it up was to install and tram the Saunders tooling plate. One of the things that attracted me to this particular used mill was the owner didn't go cheap on the accessories. The Saunders tooling plate (aluminum) is about $900. He bought two matched/ground Glacern 6" vises too, certified for height on the deck within 0.0002". Trammed those in too with the (you guessed it) actual Indicol spindle adapter and Interapid DTI. Once trammed in, I covered the tooling plate with some Saunders rubber pads. These came with the mill, receipt shows they were $5 each. Should do a nice job keeping chips out of the tooling plate holes, will cut a couple to better cover the area around the 4th axis.

The Tormach has a nice tool(ing) storage compartment under the mill which now houses some extra parts, 6 or 8 sets of Aluminum vise soft jaws, 2 tombstones for the 4th axis, 3-jaw chuck/5-C collet holder for the 4th axis, T-nuts, hold downs, way oil, lifting bar, etc.

Also cut a couple of pieces of plywood for a 16" x 30" cart that'll hold some of the tooling. I've got 60+ TTS tool holders for this mill, so going to break out the Brother label maker and start labeling things here shortly. Once nice feature on the Tormach (and I'm sure others) is I can populate the automatic tool changer with 10 tools and have it automatically cycle them over the electronic tool setter and record the tool heights. The mill also came with a Tormach granite surface plate and height gauge with a USB link to PathPilot for recording the tool heights, so will probably use both methods and do some learning.

Still have a lot of work to do before I make chips. The cooling system uses a 1/2 HP sump pump with a plastic tub set to the LH side. The mill came with 5 gallons of water-based coolant, need to mix it up and do a little plumbing.

I'll use the mill with the open enclosure this year and come up with a design for a full enclosure probably next spring (too many other things to work on . . . .). The mill also came with a MistAway filter/oil collector that will eventually get plumbed into the finished cabinet. These go for $1350 on Amazon and are supposed to do a really good job sucking the coolant out of the air. My unit includes a HEPA filter that goes on top, close to the one pictured below but mine will need about another 15" of head room. More to follow, still have 3 boxes of stuff that came with the mill to go through.
Thanks for looking,

Bruce


Crawled into the barn attic to run a couple of power lines to my new to me Tormach 1100.
20190630_141053.jpg


Saunders Tool fixture plate covers to keep most of the swarf out of the 1/2" fixture holes. The top half of the holes are reamed to around 0.501" (1/2" dowels slip in/out with some effort), 1/2-13" tapped holes through the bottom half. The rubber sheets have 1/2" plugs that drop into the fixture plate holes to secure them in place.
20190630_154334.jpg


Using the tooling cabinet to store extra soft/hard jaws, tombstones and other hardware
20190630_170934.jpg20190630_170943.jpg


Mill came with 60+ TTS tool holders and 50+ ER20/ER16 collets, Haimer 3-D probe, and an ETS that's in (hopefully) some of the boxes I haven't gone through yet.
20190630_171115.jpg


Using a 16" x 30" HF cart to hold some of the tooling. Parallels, 4th axis tail stock, electronic tool setting height gauge on the bottom, more commonly used stuff up top.
20190630_171134.jpg


MistAway MA700 unit, have the same one with a HEPA filter on top to keep from breathing coolant fume/vapor
297543
 

hman

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Couldn't have said it better, myself. Happy for you, Bruce.
 

GoceKU

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Today i made a list what jobs to finish first so i won't be taking apart staff that i've assembled, an first was the thick wires to the starter, i've replaced them when i first bought this car but since then i've found out many things that someone made so badly that are unsafe, so i thought i'll check the starter, and yes instead of three M8 bolts someone used two M6 with nuts and one entity missing i disassembled and cleaned up the starter, the brushes are nearly new. I looked for a date and found that this is not the original starter this one is made in bulgaria, it is a very heavy starter, all cast iron so i painted the body to stop it from rusting and started assembling it. I run the wires thru two fireproof insulation and used shrink wrap and cable ties to secure it, then i focus on the wiring on this corner, i removed the old voltage regulator and other relays, wrapped the unused connectors and secued the rest of the wiring i got the dash gauges out and traced the wire to the light for the alternator and connected the Alternator with all new and insulated connectors, i put the connector for the headlights and indicators easy to access to be easy to trace if i ever need to. This job took me about 6 hours but now i'm sure the starter in bolted with proper M8 stainless bolts and this part of the wiring is sorted, i'll have to run wiring for the fans letter on. I thought Italian electrics are bad this is worse.
IMG_20190629_204608.jpgIMG_20190629_210107.jpgIMG_20190630_171507.jpgIMG_20190630_174246.jpgIMG_20190630_182139.jpg
 

davidcarmichael

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32
I've been trying out some accessories I bought for the rotary table this winter.

View attachment 263165

It's a Vertex HV-8 8" rotary table. It fits pretty well on the 8x30 table of my mill.

Mounted a MT3 -> ER32 adapter into the rotary table. Had to make a thick washer and dig-out a metric bolt for a mini drawbar. It was cheap enough although the .002 runout isn't anything to write home about. It should do for many applications but for fussy stuff I will have to use a center + dog.

View attachment 263173

Also got the DP-2 dividing plate kit made for this rotary table. Had to do a bit of fitting (the crank wouldn't fit on the shaft) but it's working well now. I did briefly consider obtaining the popular BS-1 dividing head, but I have enough trouble keeping the rust off this thing without having another rarely used piece of tooling. Compared to the BS-1, the table doesn't pivot but those big plates support all divisions 100 and below, whereas most of the smaller heads start having trouble with divisions over 50. It's not a problem for this setup, but notice the plate's considerable overhang at the edge of the table.

Also picked-up a tailstock. It's not from Vertex, but this one was a bit cheaper and seems nicer. The height is adjustable with a knob and it has enough range for the rotary table at the top end and extends down to support collet blocks (on parallels) in the vise which should come in quite handy. I was also surprised the supplied mounting bolts fit in the smaller slots of this mill table.

Have a small job for the table tomorrow and then it's back onto the shelf. I'm so glad I didn't buy a bigger table as this thing is heavy enough to lug around.
What is the size of the spring clip that holds the guide and plate onto the shaft? I have the same table and plate but I think I was sent the clip for the smaller one. A photo with dimensions would really be appreciated.
Thanks
 

GoceKU

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Today i continued working on the Little Niva. With the front painted i need to start assembling the cooling system, so i started with the fans, they have been fited before but i need to make couple of air deflectors to make the system efficient, i made the side pieces from galvanised steel and the top piece from aluminium, bending cutting the sheet steel is easier but still hard, so this took me close to 6 hours but i did everything right, all the brackets got painted, all the screws got lock washers i even double lock the main bolts for the radiator from the fear of them vibrating loose. It is looking great.
IMG_20190629_145821.jpgIMG_20190629_201611.jpgIMG_20190629_145830.jpgIMG_20190629_201913.jpgIMG_20190629_201911.jpg
 

greenail

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it isn't real yet but figuring out how it worked and designing it in fusion 360 was a bit of a project. I'm wondering if I should make one?


this was inspired by a sculpture i stumbled on:

 

RJSakowski

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Today, I finished putting our tractor back together. The low range gear lost about a third of its teeth and in order to replace it, the tractor had to be split in two. To do so required draining the fuel, the hydraulic fluid, and the transmission fluid and removing the hydraulic reservoir and rear controls and the fuel tank. Also, the linkages for the transmission, the brakes and parking brakes, the PTO, the 4WD were disconnected. When that was complete, front end was set on blocks and the transmission was unbolted from the shuttle shift assembly. The rear end was then wheeled away from the front.

Nortrac Repair10 _01.JPG

Once the transmission was fully exposed it was apparent that the rear end would have to be completely disassembled. This meant pulling the brake assemblies, the differential assembly, the hydraulic unit, and the left and right half axles.

Figuring out how to do this was a bit of a challenge as there is no shop manual. I had to rely on the parts diagram and my general knowledge of things mechanical. Needless to say, there were a few missteps along the way.

Nortrac Repair 3 .JPGNortrac Repair 9 .JPG


Nortrac Repair 2 .JPG
The hydraulic unit removed. I had to buy a 2t. shop hoist from HF to do the job.

Nortrac Repair 1 .JPG
With the hudraulic unit removed, the rear half of the transmission was exposed. Everything except for the gold PTO shaft and the gearset at at the left hd to be removed.

Nortrac Repair 7 .JPG
The front half of the transmission. The damgad gearis below the gear cluster shownand everything had to be removed from this section as well.

With the new gears in place, reassembly began. I thought that it would be comparatively easy but was oh so wrong. There is a specific order that the reassembly must be done. Altering the order meant significantly harder assembly or having to unassemble. With two steps forward, one step back, the tractor was finally whole again after 60+hours of work and 17 days elapsed.

To make things more complicated, the humidity the last several days has been excessively oppressive. Although I was working in the relatively cool barn, the floor was below the dew point so moisture was condensing on the floor. I periodically spread a layer of Oil Dry and swept the floor but that was only good for an hour or two. Myself, I changed clothes three times a day and managed to drop ten lbs. in the ordeal.

A brief test of all the functions was successful and the tractor is ready for work again.
 

hman

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Good GRIEF!!!! An ordeal, indeed. Sounds like a brand new corollary of Murphy's law - the part that fails is the most inaccessible one in the entire assembly.
 

turnitupper

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Today, I finished putting our tractor back together. The low range gear lost about a third of its teeth and in order to replace it, the tractor had to be split in two. To do so required draining the fuel, the hydraulic fluid, and the transmission fluid and removing the hydraulic reservoir and rear controls and the fuel tank. Also, the linkages for the transmission, the brakes and parking brakes, the PTO, the 4WD were disconnected. When that was complete, front end was set on blocks and the transmission was unbolted from the shuttle shift assembly. The rear end was then wheeled away from the front.

View attachment 297685

Once the transmission was fully exposed it was apparent that the rear end would have to be completely disassembled. This meant pulling the brake assemblies, the differential assembly, the hydraulic unit, and the left and right half axles.

Figuring out how to do this was a bit of a challenge as there is no shop manual. I had to rely on the parts diagram and my general knowledge of things mechanical. Needless to say, there were a few missteps along the way.

View attachment 297686View attachment 297687


View attachment 297689
The hydraulic unit removed. I had to buy a 2t. shop hoist from HF to do the job.

View attachment 297690
With the hudraulic unit removed, the rear half of the transmission was exposed. Everything except for the gold PTO shaft and the gearset at at the left hd to be removed.

View attachment 297691
The front half of the transmission. The damgad gearis below the gear cluster shownand everything had to be removed from this section as well.

With the new gears in place, reassembly began. I thought that it would be comparatively easy but was oh so wrong. There is a specific order that the reassembly must be done. Altering the order meant significantly harder assembly or having to unassemble. With two steps forward, one step back, the tractor was finally whole again after 60+hours of work and 17 days elapsed.

To make things more complicated, the humidity the last several days has been excessively oppressive. Although I was working in the relatively cool barn, the floor was below the dew point so moisture was condensing on the floor. I periodically spread a layer of Oil Dry and swept the floor but that was only good for an hour or two. Myself, I changed clothes three times a day and managed to drop ten lbs. in the ordeal.

A brief test of all the functions was successful and the tractor is ready for work again.
Ulysses!.
John.
 

GoceKU

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RJ i'm surprised of how small the gears are i've broken and fixed many gearboxes plenty of stripped gears broken gearbox cases snapped shafts, and when doing any repairs is best to fully take it apart and clean everything there will be metal parts in places you never imagine also you have bronze pieces on the broken gear which means ether a worn synhros if it has any, or worn shift fork. Thanks for sharing.
 

GoceKU

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Today i continued working on the Little Niva, and today Was hose central, i started with replacing the vacuum hose to the brake booster, the one i installed is about 30 years younger i also install a VW one way valve, i don't trust the one in the booster so this will provide me a peice of mine. Then i started on the main cooling pipes, i'm using a stainless pipe to deliver the cold water from the radiator but fiting it and finding hoses and clamps was a bit hard the design on the Niva is from the Fiat 124 from the 60's so it uses an external thermostat, so there is a lot of hoses on the top hose i used a Seat elbow with a 3rd port to went any trapped air in the expansion bottle then i mounted the expansion bottle as high as i could and run the vent hose, then i mounted the LPG gas valve and filter then i made a bracket and hanged the evaporator, i run a rubber coated copper pipe between them and stopped. This took me about 6 hours and my hands are tired also working bent over the fender doesn't do my back any good, hope you like seeing the project.
IMG_20190630_190400.jpgIMG_20190630_190406.jpgIMG_20190630_203759.jpgIMG_20190630_204959.jpgIMG_20190630_212703.jpg
 

RJSakowski

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Good GRIEF!!!! An ordeal, indeed. Sounds like a brand new corollary of Murphy's law - the part that fails is the most inaccessible one in the entire assembly.
I looked at my thermometer this morning and the maximum temperature yesterday hit 102.5 in the shade. 86% relative humidity. That explains the floor and my sweating!
 

GoceKU

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Last few days the temperatures have been getting around 40 degrees but today it was particularly worm over 40 C and no wind that means not working outside but my brothers troubleshoot car has failed its brake test and most of the mechanics are on vacation so he took it to the dealership where they told him he needs brake shoes front and rear and they can servis him in 2 weeks, this was very strange to me because i turned his front rotors about a month ago and he put in new pads. So, brothers care i took it on and this is what i found. The fronts ware new i did bleed the system just to replace the fluid on each corner but the real problem was in the back drum brakes, VW used plastic pieces for the shoes to ride against and they have worn away and had made a groove in the back plate and the shoe was no longer on the hydraulic piston, this was making the entire assembly jam up, i called around and no one was selling those plastic clips so i got some bronze out and turn couple of them on my lathe, i assembled them and got them working, i also checked the drums they are near the upper limit so i decided to reuse them till the shoes get used next time everything gets replaced, is a huge time saver when you have the knowledge and equipment to make small parts like that.
IMG_20190701_175516.jpgIMG_20190701_184508.jpgIMG_20190701_185109.jpgIMG_20190701_185204.jpgIMG_20190701_193033.jpg
 

tjb

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Today, I finished putting our tractor back together. The low range gear lost about a third of its teeth and in order to replace it, the tractor had to be split in two. To do so required draining the fuel, the hydraulic fluid, and the transmission fluid and removing the hydraulic reservoir and rear controls and the fuel tank. Also, the linkages for the transmission, the brakes and parking brakes, the PTO, the 4WD were disconnected. When that was complete, front end was set on blocks and the transmission was unbolted from the shuttle shift assembly. The rear end was then wheeled away from the front.

View attachment 297685

Once the transmission was fully exposed it was apparent that the rear end would have to be completely disassembled. This meant pulling the brake assemblies, the differential assembly, the hydraulic unit, and the left and right half axles.

Figuring out how to do this was a bit of a challenge as there is no shop manual. I had to rely on the parts diagram and my general knowledge of things mechanical. Needless to say, there were a few missteps along the way.

View attachment 297686View attachment 297687


View attachment 297689
The hydraulic unit removed. I had to buy a 2t. shop hoist from HF to do the job.

View attachment 297690
With the hudraulic unit removed, the rear half of the transmission was exposed. Everything except for the gold PTO shaft and the gearset at at the left hd to be removed.

View attachment 297691
The front half of the transmission. The damgad gearis below the gear cluster shownand everything had to be removed from this section as well.

With the new gears in place, reassembly began. I thought that it would be comparatively easy but was oh so wrong. There is a specific order that the reassembly must be done. Altering the order meant significantly harder assembly or having to unassemble. With two steps forward, one step back, the tractor was finally whole again after 60+hours of work and 17 days elapsed.

To make things more complicated, the humidity the last several days has been excessively oppressive. Although I was working in the relatively cool barn, the floor was below the dew point so moisture was condensing on the floor. I periodically spread a layer of Oil Dry and swept the floor but that was only good for an hour or two. Myself, I changed clothes three times a day and managed to drop ten lbs. in the ordeal.

A brief test of all the functions was successful and the tractor is ready for work again.
Been there, done that! Had to split my MF 383 to replace the clutch, and I've helped split a couple JD 4000 series tractors. Did you do it alone, or did you have help?

Regards,
Terry

P.S.: Have enjoyed working with cast acrylic after your advice on drawer liners several months ago.
 

Cadillac

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Ah splitting tractors is fun:confused:. Just pulled a new holland apart because of a burnt 2 stage clutch and the pto engagement gear wouldn’t stay locked in. Operator had toasted the clutch and was trying to limp it by grinding the pto engagement in. Very similar to what you just did. They suck.
I have a 74 ford 531 I’m doing a clutch in this coming week. Blocking one side of the tractor and using the wheels to move is the way to do it. I’ve found longer bellhousing bolts 12” and put them in housing to align halves while matting tractor back together. Helps a lot to where I can do the jobs by myself. Aligning was a pain always.
What type of tractor is it a Massey, case, or mahindra?
 

RJSakowski

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Been there, done that! Had to split my MF 383 to replace the clutch, and I've helped split a couple JD 4000 series tractors. Did you do it alone, or did you have help?

Regards,
Terry

P.S.: Have enjoyed working with cast acrylic after your advice on drawer liners several months ago.
Aside from having my wife help lift the half axles in place, I did all the work myself. The shop hoist worked out well; a great investment. A second hoist would have made the job easier. Reassembling the two halves was a bit of a problem. I wheeled the rear end into place with the rear wheels. I had attached an 8' length of 3" channel to the draw bar which let me tweak the orientation horizontally and vertically. Moving slowly and checking alignment often was the key.

I'm glad your experience working with acrylic was good.
 

Franko

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Great job, RJ. Tractors are hard.
 

jocat54

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I have had to split my 1971 Ford 2000 3cyl diesel 3 times now to replace the the dual disc clutch -----every time I let one of my kids use it:(
The hardest part for me is removing the front end loader from it without the tractor moving on its own. Lots of jacks and blocks.
 

dirty tools

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I worked for John Deere dealership for a few years
Took many apart for various mechanical issues
We had a special track system to keep it aligned
Every model was similar but all was a pain
It took more time to dissemble than to make the repairs
 
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