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POTD- PROJECT OF THE DAY: What Did You Make In Your Shop Today?

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savarin

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I decided to have a go at making a con-rod for the crankshaft I made earlier.
This took all day today.
I started with a wedge of Swiss cheese,
conrod-1.jpg
and faced it into a block of Swiss cheese
conrod-2.jpg
I cut the block in half and soft soldered it back together, drilled it through the cut, thinned it down, drilled two holes in the end and bolted it to a 10mm flat steel plate with a keeper plate. I got the keeper idea from here
and as it now looks like I am going to build a steam engine I will probably steal the Stephenson's link design from here as well.
Then back in the chuck between centres and turned down
conrod-3.jpg
then flat in the 4 jaw to bore the big end out.
I was given a set of telescoping gauges a couple of years ago and this is the first time they have been used.
I like them.
conrod-4.jpg
I was able to bore the big end to around a thou under size so its a very tight fit on the crankshaft.

conrod-5.jpg
so I gave it some wellie to run it in, tightening it down after a while.
conrod-6.jpg
This worked very well and didnt flap around, the blue stuff is chain saw bar oil.
Its still too tight so tomorrow I think some plastic for the rod to slide on and leave it running.
An expanding reamer would be nice but I dont have one.
The keeper plate and the corresponding part on the end of the rod will be thinned down to what looks right.
My theory on the swiss cheese is the holes will hold some oil helping this along.
Now I have to think of how I will make the little end
 
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hman

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I'm always impressed by the things you make on your lathe! Now a question:
... so I gave it some wellie to run it in, tightening it down after a while ...
What's a "wellie"? I've come to really enjoy the "common language that separates our two peoples," and can usually understand British or Aussie terms. But this one's new to me.
 

savarin

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Short for Wellington boot, in this usage it means putting the boot down on the accelerator.
The expression "Give it some wellie" means speed it up or use more effort.
Sometimes it was used "Give him/them the wellie" where wellie replaces the word "boot" and means "Give him the boot or sack ie termination of employment.
Its an English expression from my teens so I doubt if its used as much today.
I also love slang and believe it adds colour to a language.
If you like the differences between the three forms of English what about "Root"
USA, root for your team - cheering them on
AUS, root through your drawers - searching for something
UK , a good root - the sex was excellent
drag yer plates a meat down the apples and pears along the frog an toad to the rubba-dub for a pigs ear.
 

sgisler

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Short for Wellington boot......drag yer plates a meat down the apples and pears along the frog an toad to the rubba-dub for a pigs ear.
A little cockney rhyming slang? Don’t know all of those, but i think you’re dragging your ‘bones’ down to the pub for a beer. Colloquialisms are cool. The ‘trouble n strife’ is one of my faves.



Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

savarin

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not bad, take your feet down the stairs along the road to the pub for a beer.
 

sgisler

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Ah, yes!


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Nogoingback

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A little cockney rhyming slang? Don’t know all of those, but i think you’re dragging your ‘bones’ down to the pub for a beer. Colloquialisms are cool. The ‘trouble n strife’ is one of my faves.



Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

Trouble n strife = your wife
Fat n wide = your bride

I guess Cockney doctors have rhyming slang for their patients and medical terms. Great stuff.
 

savarin

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Mind you rhyming slang doesnt rhyme any more, quite often the last word is dropped and occasionally another that rhymes with the first word is used instead.
get yer barnet cut is get your Barnet fair cut or a hair cut.
 

GoceKU

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The little Niva is Yellow again. I had to drive it couple of dozen km without both windscreens and with the seat not bolted in. We managed to sneak it in, in between shifts in a large professional paint booth that way it was free. The color is a shade darker than the original but it pops more. In the hurry to get it painted i forgot to mask the front grill and exhaust. The paint lay down smoothly not much dirt in it, not bad for less than an hour in and out of the booth.
IMG_20190808_121434.jpgIMG_20190808_121444.jpgIMG_20190808_121452_1.jpgIMG_20190808_121512.jpg
 

HBilly1022

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I've been away from this forum for a long time and often thought about you and your "little Niva".

My first visit back and I find this post about your progress. Made my day!! Your determination and skills are very impressive. :encourage::encourage:
 

GoceKU

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Today i'm back to work on the little niva.
I started with installing the Lights, markers, turn signals, almost everything is bend new so it went together quickly but the wiring for them took some work. And of course nothing is working, i did test them to the first connector they are connected but the wiring is a real mess, burn wires, mice damaged wires, corroded connectors, old style italian fuses that work or not depended on what bump you hit when driving. I also assembled the chrome trunk handle and lock, more thing i put on more it starting to look more like a car again.
IMG_20190808_203722.jpgIMG_20190808_203730.jpgIMG_20190808_203654.jpg
 

jaek

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Adapter for a Reliance Aqua-tainer spout to 3/8” NPT so I can fill my RV. The spout had an oddball thread - little under 1 inch and 14 tpi. 3/4 pipe was a little too big, but easy enough with the lathe.
C53332C2-ED0B-47FB-AF90-A95EF81B172D.jpeg

Discovered that is indeed possible to break Delrin chips with enough feed.
 

silverhawk

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I totally cheated. I wanted a way to organize my AXA tool holders, and I'm too lazy to 3D print some. So I ordered 1.5" x 0.375" (3/8") 6061 aluminum flat bar, threw it onto my Harbor Freight mini mill with the Wen angle vise (pretty cool, but not terribly accurate - something I didn't need in this case). I milled a 30-degree angle onto the flat bar. I know this first picture is difficult to see the mill and vise, but here it is anyway :





Then I test fit some of my AXA tool holders.





Now all I have to do is drill through it, counterbore, and attach them to where I want them (I might have to build an angled bracket so I can get them in tighter and more efficient, we'll see). They are definitely loose (if you need it solid, you need to start with something larger than 1.5" width bar stock, but the 0.375" is still a good height for the AXA holders). This is what happens when my wife gives me a day to play.
 

mattthemuppet2

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that looks bloody fabulous, well done!

Here's my project of the last 3 years. Started thinking about this 3 years ago almost to the day, finished it today - poly-v spindle and countershaft pulleys for my Atlas 618. Quite a bit of close tolerance machining in that, plus the first turning between centers I've done. Came out pretty well :)



full thread here
 

GoceKU

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Today i've spent the entire day from sunrise till sundown in the big garage. I started in the back of the Niva, all the wires going to the tail lights had chue marks from mice so i cut a lot of them out and replaced them, i cramped new connectors and connected them. I also left wires for the trailer hitch. Then i started going forward replacing some of the wires insulation some and i wrapped all the looms with protective tape, i like this soft type because it doesn't rattle as much as the plastic tape. I found couple eaten thru wires behind the fuses that fixes some of the lights and made the light relays sound like a buzzer. So i replaced all the relays, then i changed the indicator relay with a used one and still they won't worked so i grabbed another one and that one worked, that fixed both hazards and indicators, new switches fixed the lights and heater fan, with that everything works except the interior lights. Then i started the herculean task of replacing the fuse box. I had this fusebox from a citroen saxo so using a multimeter and a test light i spent the next 6 hours rewiring it, i run an extra fuse because i ran out of circuits in the fuse box now everything works all the time including the interior lights, no shaking wires or fuses needed. Big job and i'm glad is finished.
IMG_20190808_203638.jpgIMG_20190809_112020.jpgIMG_20190809_140003.jpgIMG_20190809_112032.jpgIMG_20190809_163913.jpgIMG_20190809_151132.jpg
 

savarin

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Truly the labours of Hercules.
Not long now.
 

pdentrem

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Made a sleeve for skate sharpening machine for the local shop. The machine is no longer supported so used an idler pulley from a Chevy and naturally the bearing has an ID larger than the original. So made a shouldered sleeve to adapt it. This morning semi finished the section of driveway that had been stone for the last few years. Snowblower and cats loved it so I replaced it with pavers. Took a month of weekends to dig out and flatten the gravel base. Done enough now to relax for the rest of the day!

FC2E6C05-36BF-4E6C-9D30-43267B9282A3.jpeg
 

Flyinfool

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Got the power feed to move the table back and forth on my surface grinder. Still lots to do before it is working correctly, but at least it moves under its own power now.
 

Janderso

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My wife went to visit a friend in Seattle for the weekend.
That gave me some time to make some t nuts for the rotary table. Now I can start working on the pallet or sacrificial work plate.
I didn't notice that before? One of the nuts has a hole off center. Hmm, something must have moved.
26CCAAD3-0E00-46B2-B099-95850C1DA875.jpegD3D033ED-3AC2-4FB2-8930-C00931F0F2DE.jpeg
 
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GoceKU

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Today i started my day by calling around trying to find a front windscreen, and the closest to me was next town over in skopje, so i went there, brand new 50$ this took me couple of hours, then i focused on installing the rear windscreen, removing the chrome strip and washing the rubber seal and soaking it in hot water. With the help of some soapy water and a rope i installed it. Then i went to the front and install the heater inlet and the hood rubber seal, Niva badges in the rear and couple other small things.
IMG_20190810_112116.jpgIMG_20190809_210208.jpgIMG_20190809_210216.jpg
 

BGHansen

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POTD was a “Honey-Do”, pun intended. My wife Tracy made a bee hive last year for honey and bees wax and stocked it with a swarm this spring. Guess the bees like where we are as in about a month’s time they filled the first of two boxes with comb, brood and honey. She happened to check the second box a month later and it was full also. Problem is, if the bees have no place to build their comb, they could swarm and leave to find a new home.


Lower hive box on June 30
20190630_172449.jpg

Upper box on June 30
20190630_172508.jpg

Both boxes full by August 7
20190807_190331.jpg

My wife can be quite meticulous on her projects. Her hive boxes have finger-joints that were cut on our table saw, then hand filled (die filer) and fitted with furniture-quality joinery. Quality can take time, she spent about a month in the evenings making the original boxes. There was a sense of urgency for a couple of additional boxes, so she solicited my help.

I’ve made many finger-joints on my table saw with an indexing jig on the miter gauge, but took the opportunity to do a little CNC programming on my new to me Tormach 1100 mill. I bought the mill close to 2 months ago but haven’t had the time to do anything on it. I have a Bridgeport with a circa 1983 Anilam Crusader 2 controller and am pretty adept at its conversational programming. But until now hadn’t done any G-code programming.

One nice thing about the PathPilot Tormach control is it shows your programmed path on the screen. So, no surprise wild moves because of a fat-fingered coordinate.

The box sides were too long to cut vertically, so that meant cutting with an end mill on the flat which would leave a radius in the corner of the joints. The routine spot drilled, drilled 1/8” corner holes, then milled/routed out the fingers with a ¼” 2-flute end mill. The 1/8” hole minimizes the radii in the corners of the joints.


Basic set up for all of the joints. Really like the fixture plate on my Tormach. It's within 0.0005" across 20" last time I checked. Nice to drop in a few 1/2" dowel pins and know you're square to the mill.
20190804_174100.jpg

Spot drilling
20190804_174327.jpg

Drilling 1/8" through holes in the bottom corners of the finger joints
20190804_174401.jpg

1/4" end mill doing the routing
20190804_174538.jpg


Nice thing about the CNC is naturally repeatability if/when I make multiples. The routines take an extra 0.002” on each side of the notches so there is a little clearance for a slip fit. Figured glue, wood expansion and bees filling any holes naturally would take care of a paper-thick clearance in the joints. Proved out the routines on a scrap piece of plywood, then on to the pine and cedar boards.

One box end has a window cut in it. Used a laser center finder to find the penciled layout lines and wrote a routine to cut out the window. Used a Rotozip bit for the cutter.


Laser center/edge finder picking up the pencil lines for the window cutout
20190805_115615.jpg

20190805_115831.jpg

Wrote a routine to cut out the window with a rotozip bit
20190805_123753.jpg

Assembled "super" box which has a screen under that the queen can't fit through, but the worker bees can. The queen lays eggs for brood in the honeycomb, blocking her from this top box means it'll only have honey in the comb. The bees build the comb from the bottom of sticks called "frames".
20190806_171448.jpg

Finished standard box with the "peeping Tom" window
20190806_171605.jpg

Peek from above of the filled 2nd box
20190807_192117.jpg


Everything went together like a dream. Puts a smile on my face every time I see the mill doing what I’ve told it. Also like the auto tool changer as it automatically changed between the spotting drill, 1/8” drill and ¼” end mill. Gives the option of walking away for the 1 ½ to 3 ½ minutes each routine took to run.


My better half adding the new boxes
20190807_192306.jpg


Plan is to learn Fusion 360 so the G-codes will be generated from its CAM package, but for now I’m happy with doing G0, G1, G2/3, M06 G43, G81, etc. manually.

Thanks for looking,


Bruce
 
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BGHansen

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POTD was more of a few weeks project to build a new chicken coup for our chickens, ducks and turkeys. My wife built the original coup out of shop scrap around 10 years ago. We attached a 5’ x 10’ dog kennel to the side so the birds could get out of the coup, but were still safe and secure.


Original coup was 4' x 8' by 6' tall. 5' x 10' dog kennel attached on the East end.
20190722_094122.jpg


My wife designed the new coup in Unigraphics. We learned some lessons on the first one that resulted in a much-improved new hen house. One problem with the original design was it was tough to muck out the coup as the roosts were fixed which made it tough to shovel. Also, being made from shop scraps, most of the lumber was not exterior grade.


Nice to work from a plan. The new coup is 5' x 9' x 8' tall at the top of the shed. 3' entry door makes for easy clean out. Dog kennel was expanded from 10' to 5' x 15'. Roof over the kennel area is 6' of barn steel and 9' of polycarbonate.
20190722_094719.jpg


We made the cuts in our shop and pre-assembled the basic structure. Then broke down the walls and hauled them up to the house.


Stood up the walls and worked out the details in the shop. Kind of committed once we torn down the old coup to get the new one up.
20190721_172601.jpg


The dog kennel area got expanded from 10’ to 15’ long. It has a steel roof with rafters and perlins, standard pole barn construction. Attached 2 x 4’ sole plates to the top of the dog kennel sections with lag screws through the top pipes. Then framed up from there (studs and a top plate).


View from the dog kennel end. The trash can in the corner is a collector for rain water off the roof (added eave troughs after this photo). My wife put in a watering system using something called "chicken nipples".
20190804_135737.jpg

Coup end
20190804_135838.jpg

Box under the RH window is a nesting box where the chickens lay their eggs
20190804_135846.jpg


The roosts are now on a pivot with stair stringers on the ends. They swing up to the back wall which opens up the floor for easy shoveling. Also ran a 110V 20A circuit for lights and power (heated water dish and a 250W heater in the winter).


Look inside. What looks like stairs are roosts for the chickens. The whole thing now pivots up out of the way for easier clean out.
20190804_140259.jpg


Still a little more work to do. Next will be insulating the walls and putting up ¼” luan to dress out the inside. Didn’t shoot pictures of it, but added an eave trough on it that drains to a 30-gallon trash can for auto-watering the birds.

Thanks for looking,

Bruce
 

BGHansen

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POTD was fixing a bracket to hold a Tormach tool holder plate to my mill. The previous owner 3-D printed a plastic bracket that set over the chip pan with the aluminum tool holding plate screwed in place. Went out to the shop and noticed 20 tool holders setting on the floor, 3-D printed bracket failed and dropped everything to the floor.


3-D printed "U" bracket failed under the load of 20 tool holders
20190809_203002.jpg


Started with a block of Delrin and milled an angled face and rabbet to accept a 1/16” thick piece of bent stainless steel from my scrap bin. Drilled and tapped some ¼”-20’s and bolted it together with button-head cap screws. Works great though probably will need to make something different once I build a full enclosure for the mill.


Squaring up a block of Delrin and facing a surface with an angle where the tool holder plate will attach
20190805_171627.jpg
20190805_173321.jpg

Cutting a rabbet in the Delrin so the block nests over the mill's chip pan edge
20190809_172954.jpg

Spotted and clearance hole drill a 1/16" stainless steel bracket
20190809_195236.jpg
20190809_195604.jpg

Transferred the bracket holes with a Sharpie and found center with a laser center finder
20190809_200052.jpg

Spot, tap drill and tapped the bracket holes
20190809_200217.jpg
20190809_200707.jpg
20190809_200856.jpg

Flipped the block and spotted, tap drilled and tapped the holes for attaching the tool holder plate
20190809_201356.jpg
20190809_201532.jpg
20190809_201623.jpg

Bottom view of the plate. The Delrin block and stainless bracket slip over the edge of the chip pan
20190809_202532.jpg

Good to go! I can stand on this one without fear of finding 20 tools on the cement shop floor.
20190809_202808.jpg


Thanks for looking,

Bruce
 

silverhawk

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POTD was a “Honey-Do”, pun intended. My wife Tracy made a bee hive last year for honey and bees wax and stocked it with a swarm this spring. Guess the bees like where we are as in about a month’s time they filled the first of two boxes with comb, brood and honey. She happened to check the second box a month later and it was full also. Problem is, if the bees have no place to build their comb, they could swarm and leave to find a new home.

My wife can be quite meticulous on her projects. Her hive boxes have finger-joints that were cut on our table saw, then hand filled (die filer) and fitted with furniture-quality joinery. Quality can take time, she spent about a month in the evenings making the original boxes. There was a sense of urgency for a couple of additional boxes, so she solicited my help.

I’ve made many finger-joints on my table saw with an indexing jig on the miter gauge, but took the opportunity to do a little CNC programming on my new to me Tormach 1100 mill. I bought the mill close to 2 months ago but haven’t had the time to do anything on it. I have a Bridgeport with a circa 1983 Anilam Crusader 2 controller and am pretty adept at its conversational programming. But until now hadn’t done any G-code programming.

One nice thing about the PathPilot Tormach control is it shows your programmed path on the screen. So, no surprise wild moves because of a fat-fingered coordinate.

The box sides were too long to cut vertically, so that meant cutting with an end mill on the flat which would leave a radius in the corner of the joints. The routine spot drilled, drilled 1/8” corner holes, then milled/routed out the fingers with a ¼” 2-flute end mill. The 1/8” hole minimizes the radii in the corners of the joints.


Basic set up for all of the joints. Really like the fixture plate on my Tormach. It's within 0.0005" across 20" last time I checked. Nice to drop in a few 1/2" dowel pins and know you're square to the mill.

Nice thing about the CNC is naturally repeatability if/when I make multiples. The routines take an extra 0.002” on each side of the notches so there is a little clearance for a slip fit. Figured glue, wood expansion and bees filling any holes naturally would take care of a paper-thick clearance in the joints. Proved out the routines on a scrap piece of plywood, then on to the pine and cedar boards.

One box end has a window cut in it. Used a laser center finder to find the penciled layout lines and wrote a routine to cut out the window. Used a Rotozip bit for the cutter.

Wrote a routine to cut out the window with a rotozip bit
View attachment 300186

Assembled "super" box which has a screen under that the queen can't fit through, but the worker bees can. The queen lays eggs for brood in the honeycomb, blocking her from this top box means it'll only have honey in the comb. The bees build the comb from the bottom of sticks called "frames".
View attachment 300187

Peek from above of the filled 2nd box
View attachment 300189

Thanks for looking,


Bruce
I believe that to be one of the most educational posts on this thread that I've seen. I'm glad you didn't chicken out on those posts - they are sure worth combing through them.
 
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