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POTD- PROJECT OF THE DAY: What Did You Make In Your Shop Today?

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mmcmdl

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Spent the last 2 days on the vehicles . Brake job on Civic with screw in calipers , never knew they existed ! Then , took the cat off the Power Stroke and punched it out . The truck picked up a lot of power and runs cooler now . The trash truck got the platinum . :cool:

I also got a few items shipped finally , and have quite a few more to finish up . :encourage:
 

BGHansen

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I believe that to be one of the most educational posts on this thread that I've seen. I'm glad you didn't chicken out on those posts - they are sure worth combing through them.
Thanks! I worry a lot about being too wordy or too many photos. I remember thinking a mechanical edge finder was used by flushing the two halves, then slowly turning the hand wheel until I could feel the edge with my fingernail and it hit the material. Never dawned on my until I saw a video on Tom Griffin's site "Tom's Techniques" that you did it with the mill running. I figure there are many others out there with more experience who will suggest improvements as I still have plenty to learn! Also, guys with less experience might see something that wasn't so obvious like my edge finder story.

I mentioned to a machinist at work that I needed to cut around 300 1 1/2" stainless steel 8-32 screws down to 1 3/8". I did the job by chucking up a 1 3/8" length of CRS, drilled a clearance hole about 1 1/4" deep and the tap drill hole through the last 1/4". Tapped that and cut the screws down in the lathe buy running the screw into the 1/4" of thread and parted to length. It worked OK but took quite a bit of time running the screws in and out of the bushing, then chucking, etc.

He gave me a little fixture the next day for my mill. He took a 1/2" wide piece of CRS 1 3/8" wide, maybe 6" long and drilled a series of 8-32 clearance holes through the 1 3/8" dimension of the plate. Took a piece of 3/8" key stock around 6" long for a top/bottom. In use, I'd drop 20 screws into the block leaving an 1/8" sticking out of the other end. Set the second block on top and flip the whole thing so the 1/8" screw ends were sticking out of the top. Set that on my mill vise and clamped it down. Then went across the top with a 1/4" end mill and voila, 20 1 3/8" screws. I'd have never thought of that idea in 100 years. Almost looked forward to making another 300!

Bruce
 
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GoceKU

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Today was the hottest day yet, way past the 40 degree mark but i had the day off work so i made the most of it. Started with cleaning the sedan windshield rubber seals then cutting two and making one bigger, than spent the next 2 hours wrestling with the new windsheel getting it installed. I finally managed to get in installed then i got the dashboard out i did not like the texture from the bed liner, so bought a new can of bed liner and mat black paint, i sprayed a new coat on it waited 15 min and sprayed the entire dash mat black, then i went back to assembling the little niva installed the wipers, had to remove and grease the leakage then i installed new blades and tested them. By this time an hour had passed and the dash in the enormous heat was dry so i install it. I also installed a "new" ignition lock, plastics surrounding it, both sun visors also fitted a different steering wheel from a newer niva. Today was a very long and hot day working on the little niva, but finally it has all its windows.
IMG_20190810_210619.jpgIMG_20190810_210603_resized.jpg
 

BGHansen

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Sheer magic! "In use, I'd drop 20 screws into the block ... and voila, 25 1 3/8" screws." Too bad ya can't do the same with silver dollars :)
He was an amazing machinist! I recall him saying he'd mistakenly given his wife a glue stick instead of her lipstick once. She's still not talking to him . . . Fixed the typo from 25 to 20.

Bruce
 

GoceKU

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I pull an allnighter working on the Little Niva. First thing i installed was the chrome trim on the roof rails then the chrome trim around the door windows, i had to remove both windows wich was a task in it self but got it done. Then i stood back and look at it and the oversprayed rockers and grill needed paint, so i put a plastic sheet over the entire car and just masked what i wanted to paint mat black. After half an hour the black paint was dry but i keep the plastic on the little niva so i can paint the bumpers, i had painted them together with the wheels but i had lot of runs and fish eyes so an hour each with a some sand papire i got them prepared cleaned off and painted with base coat and clean coat, by this time sun come out and i had to go to work.
IMG_20190810_210554_resized.jpgIMG_20190811_212253.jpgIMG_20190811_213202.jpgIMG_20190811_212305.jpgIMG_20190811_213214.jpgIMG_20190812_095724.jpg
 

wlburton

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I pull an allnighter working on the Little Niva. First thing i installed was the chrome trim on the roof rails then the chrome trim around the door windows, i had to remove both windows wich was a task in it self but got it done. Then i stood back and look at it and the oversprayed rockers and grill needed paint, so i put a plastic sheet over the entire car and just masked what i wanted to paint mat black. After half an hour the black paint was dry but i keep the plastic on the little niva so i can paint the bumpers, i had painted them together with the wheels but i had lot of runs and fish eyes so an hour each with a some sand papire i got them prepared cleaned off and painted with base coat and clean coat, by this time sun come out and i had to go to work.
View attachment 300291View attachment 300293View attachment 300295View attachment 300294View attachment 300292View attachment 300296
I'm not a car guy (in fact I hate working on cars) but I'm really enjoying seeing this project come to fruition!
 

Superburban

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I also have enjoyed being along for the ride.
 

hman

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+1. I'm not a car guy either, but have thoroughly enjoyed your saga. I thoroughly admire your dedication and talent ... plus the sheer amount of knowledge you must possess! I can't think of a single part or subsystem of the Niva that you haven't had to work on ... and taken care of brilliantly. I have this crazy notion that you could start with a random pile of pots, pans, paperclips, and rubber bands, and end up with a nice looking, working car.
 

GoceKU

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have this crazy notion that you could start with a random pile of pots, pans, paperclips, and rubber bands, and end up with a nice looking, working car.
Thank you guys. This was a bit longer project then i thought but now is coming together quickly. I've done much harder in complexity like RWD conversions but this is my first 4x4 off road build. hman, you forgot duct tape, too bad there is no reality show where i can build one from scratch in a deserted place.
 

GoceKU

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After work i've started back to work on the little niva. I remove the masking and started assembling it. I installed the grill, side mirrors, front towing hooks, front bumper. Then come time for the rear i wanted strong bolts to hold it and the trailer hitch on the frame, i did not have anything that big so i made me some on my lathe. I also made big threaded washers for both sides and assemble it i also install license plate holders, and the rear badge, don't mention that is crooked, so is my life, haha. This completes the exterior except the aftermarket wheel liners.
IMG_20190812_122940.jpgIMG_20190812_210305.jpgIMG_20190812_21033055.JPG
 

Winegrower

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I recently added a Harbor Freight 20 ton press, used it for a couple of projects, and decided that it was relatively hard to adjust the workpiece for the proper vertical position. So I had a few 2" and 2.5" round rods not doing anything. and since the Takisawa really does well on steel parts, I machined a small protrusion on one end of each rod and a recess on the other, and the diameter (a very loose fit) also matches the press ram. This lets me stack up a collection that fits closer to whatever work piece is involved. I can hold the lowest block in position and not have to balance/juggle the stack if I tip a little bit. .

Also, per others suggestions, I made a knob to eliminate flipping around the jack handle to work the hydraulic release valve. That's faster too. :)

Press blocks.jpg
 

ch2co

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I recently added a Harbor Freight 20 ton press, used it for a couple of projects, and decided that it was relatively hard to adjust the workpiece for the proper vertical position. So I had a few 2" and 2.5" round rods not doing anything. and since the Takisawa really does well on steel parts, I machined a small protrusion on one end of each rod and a recess on the other, and the diameter (a very loose fit) also matches the press ram. This lets me stack up a collection that fits closer to whatever work piece is involved. I can hold the lowest block in position and not have to balance/juggle the stack if I tip a little bit. .

Also, per others suggestions, I made a knob to eliminate flipping around the jack handle to work the hydraulic release valve. That's faster too. :)

View attachment 300356
 

Moper361

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Short for Wellington boot, in this usage it means putting the boot down on the accelerator.
The expression "Give it some wellie" means speed it up or use more effort.
Sometimes it was used "Give him/them the wellie" where wellie replaces the word "boot" and means "Give him the boot or sack ie termination of employment.
Its an English expression from my teens so I doubt if its used as much today.
I also love slang and believe it adds colour to a language.
If you like the differences between the three forms of English what about "Root"
USA, root for your team - cheering them on
AUS, root through your drawers - searching for something
UK , a good root - the sex was excellent
drag yer plates a meat down the apples and pears along the frog an toad to the rubba-dub for a pigs ear.
I could add a couple more for the meaning wellie top i am Australian but have worked with Gordies and many others from UK over the past 15 years and wellie or wellie top can be used in a variaty of sentences .I will just leave at that
 

GoceKU

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Today after work i found out my daily driver has multi stage ABS brakes, which is a good thing, it helped me avoid a major accident, i manage to stopped nearly 3 tone automobile in a very short distance at decent speed. New tires and heavy right foot. Any way this did not determined me from working on the little niva, so i started on the interior, started by washing the inside, and wiping everything, then i measured the rubber floor rubbers and cut them and lay them down and started installing the side plastics. Because the floor pan is been welded on almost nothing fits so i had use screws to hold everything, after i install the transmission tunnel covers i started on the wiring for the centre dash i also run wires for speakers in the back and installed those boschmann speakers in the factory speeker spot, i also run wires and install tweeters in the upper corners of the front windscreen. I installed euro connectors for the stereo and put together the centre dash. i'll look thru my radios for a CD player, something from a 18 wheeler, something that can take the bumps and still keep working.
IMG_20190813_183033.jpgIMG_20190813_183737.jpgIMG_20190813_183714.jpg
 

jdedmon91

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Been helping friends with QC tool blocks, got to looking and I needed some extra blocks for my self. So I’ve been working on these in between other projects. Yes I know I could have picked them up, but what fun is that.



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GoceKU

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Last few days i've been working hard on the interior on the little niva, i decided to use this VDO truck radio, for its durability, also installed additional gauges, for engine vacuum and Air/Fuel ratio i also mounted the LPG switch to the side. The interior is not coming as nicely as the exterior, i've ordered new back panels for the rear seats and trunk but i have to wait for them to came from Russia. I also started on the mounts for the front seats, the big bump in the middle for the gearbox and transfer case is making it impossible to fit good wide comfortable seats. And i don't want it to be a 2 seater only.
IMG_20190814_112149_1.jpg
 

stioc

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I posted this in another thread that will get buried so figured I'd post here. I needed a small form tool to make a convex shape on the inside of a ring so I started making a small boring bar and the insert. The boring bar is a 5/16" stock of 12L14 and the insert is a broken #1 HSS center drill shaped using a diamond bit in a Dremel.







I think I'll face it off a bit more and use a shorter set screw so the bar doesn't stick out as much and I'll turn the diameter down at the top and of course cut off the other end of the insert bit too.
 

tmenyc

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This is not as photogenic or dramatic as the Niva Saga, but it was my first real project in the work for which I bought my Logan 820.
The Logan was bought last winter to up my game as a vintage fountain pen restorer. It's been a hobby for years, grew into a thriving business that I call my second job, and now I'm focusing on keeping it manageable while I spend the last couple of years in full-time executive work. I wanted to find a niche I could call my own in the already fine niche arena of vintage pen restoration. To my knowledge, although there are lathes out there, most of them are used for new pen manufacture. A few restorers have lathes, but no one in the world that I know of makes parts to sell to other restorers or the public. So, it was time to start. I got the lathe, have been climbing the learning curve, making my trials and errors and issues with the bench grinder pretty public, but today all the pieces of creating my first pen part came together.
By way of explanation, most vintage fountain pens hold their ink in latex sacs, which are glued with shellac to a part called the sac nipple, which is integral to the shaped unit that holds the nib and the feed, a ribbed piece that transports ink from the sac to the nib in very small amounts. The shaped unit is called the gripping section, because it's the part you hold to write with. Simple enough, except that vintage fountain pens had several points of potential failure, most in that gripping section. The sac nipple breaks easily, particularly in a 75+ year old pen; it's generally 20-30 thou thick and made of either celluloid, the first synthetic plastic, or ebonite, vulcanized hard rubber. Modern pens' sections, whole pens, in fact, are usually of acrylic resins, and have the same issues. The good part for me is that while lots of amateur restorers can change the sacs and make all kinds of adjustments, only a pro with a lathe can make a new sac nipple.

For context, this is my hang-around-the-desk-these-days pen, a 1940s Esterbrook, they were the pre-ballpoint Bics of them all. On the right is the pen out of its barrel and cap: latex sac glued to sac nipple, gripping section, nib. The business end of a fountain pen.
48562618816_f91a40dba8_z.jpg48562618631_c54439afe1_z.jpg

So today I made my first sac nipple, of white delrin (in future I'll use black, but I wanted to see what I was doing): the feed sticking out in the middle picture is OD .227, I made the sleeve with .020 walls from a 3/8" x 2" length of delrin turned down with CCGT, and since the ID of the gripping section was around .230, had to face off the remains of the old part, then drill and bore it out to fit the .270 OD of the new sac nipple. Took me a couple of tries to get the order of operations straight, but it finally worked. This one is friction fit, future ones will have a thin epoxy layer.

48562435381_ae4016821e_z.jpg48562436021_135d04d0ed_z.jpg48562577657_c6d2ff7464_z.jpg
Sac nipples are just the beginning for me, but a substantial beginning. I probably have the purchase price of the lathe here in pens waiting for them and then get sold. Gotta admit I'm pretty happy.
Thanks for reading.

Tim
 
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silverhawk

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This is not as photogenic or dramatic as the Niva Saga, but it was my first real project in the work for which I bought my Logan 820.
The Logan was bought last winter to up my game as a vintage fountain pen restorer. It's been a hobby for years, grew into a thriving business that I call my second job, and now I'm focusing on keeping it manageable while I spend the last couple of years in full-time executive work. I wanted to find a niche I could call my own in the already fine niche arena of vintage pen restoration. To my knowledge, although there are lathes out there, most of them are used for new pen manufacture. A few restorers have lathes, but no one in the world that I know of makes parts to sell to other restorers or the public. So, it was time to start. I got the lathe, have been climbing the learning curve, making my trials and errors and issues with the bench grinder pretty public, but today all the pieces of creating my first pen part came together.
By way of explanation, most vintage fountain pens hold their ink in latex sacs, which are glued with shellac to a part called the sac nipple, which is integral to the shaped unit that holds the nib and the feed, a ribbed piece that transports ink from the sac to the nib in very small amounts. The shaped unit is called the gripping section, because it's the part you hold to write with. Simple enough, except that vintage fountain pens had several points of potential failure, most in that gripping section. The sac nipple breaks easily, particularly in a 75+ year old pen; it's generally 40-60 thou thick and made of either celluloid, the first synthetic plastic, or ebonite, vulcanized hard rubber. Modern pens' sections, whole pens, in fact, are usually of acrylic resins, and have the same issues. The good part for me is that while lots of amateur restorers can change the sacs and make all kinds of adjustments, only a pro with a lathe can make a new sac nipple.

For context, this is my hang-around-the-desk-these-days pen, a 1940s Esterbrook, they were the pre-ballpoint Bics of them all. On the right is the pen out of its barrel and cap: latex sac glued to sac nipple, gripping section, nib. The business end of a fountain pen.
View attachment 300486View attachment 300485

So today I made my first sac nipple, of white delrin (in future I'll use black, but I wanted to see what I was doing): the feed sticking out in the middle picture is OD .227, I made the sleeve with .020 walls from a 3/8" x 2" length of delrin turned down with CCGT, and since the ID of the gripping section was around .230, had to face off the remains of the old part, then drill and bore it out to fit the .270 OD of the new sac nipple. Took me a couple of tries to get the order of operations straight, but it finally worked. This one is friction fit, future ones will have a thin epoxy layer.

View attachment 300482View attachment 300483View attachment 300484
Sac nipples are just the beginning for me, but a substantial beginning. I probably have the purchase price of the lathe here in pens waiting for them and then get sold. Gotta admit I'm pretty happy.
Thanks for reading.

Tim
This is awesome! Those are some beautiful pens!

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francist

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What in interesting business, who would have thought? I remember my dad talking about Esterbrook pens, I think he liked them. I still have one of the desk sets that used to sit on his big wooden desk at his car dealership. How many people signed their fortunes away for a new Buick with those I'll never know, but I suspect quite a few!

Thanks for sharing that most interesting work.

-frank
 

tmenyc

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Thanks, Frank. Is the set useable/used? I'll restore it for you! Re "Who would have thought?" I'd be swamped if I went public with repairs in addition to the already public sales of restored pens. I think in part it's nostalgia for the pre-computer days, but for whatever reasons new and vintage fountain pen use is growing steadily, and although most of that is new pens, demand for vintage is also growing, although like vintage cars, the number of useable vintage pens shrinks daily. Happily for me, every one of them needs restoration before it can be used.

Tim
 

francist

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Thanks, Frank. Is the set useable/used?

Oh yeah, it still works. I used to use them occasionally just for kicks. I'm thinking it's from the early '60's or so, and not a fountain pen per se but still the nib style. And an Esterbrook, no less.

image.jpeg

image.jpeg

Funny story about my Dad -- before he bought the GM dealership he did a number of things to keep the rapidly expanding family afloat. One of them was selling the new-fangled ballpoint pens in vending machines. I think they cost a nickel, and you got a pen should you just happen to be walking around and think "dang, I sure could use a pen about now..". Anyway, the venture was short-lived and I don't think they ever sold any. We had the boxes of stock for years -- the cheapest, ugliest, and most gawd-awful writing implements ever made. I wish I had one of them now, I can still see the box of hundreds of the things...

-frank
 

MontanaLon

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When I was moving my mill, I inadvertently busted the hinges on the belt cover. Pot metal just can't take the sorts of force I applied to them while reinstalling them, they both split through the screw holes on the bottom half of the hinge. So I used the mill to make the half that broke and got them reinstalled. At some point I may go back and do the center pieces and the top halves that didn't break but most likely not for a while.

I need to pick up a machinery's handbook. Experimenting to get the right RPM and DOC is just not the way to go.
 

tmenyc

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Oh yeah, it still works. I used to use them occasionally just for kicks. I'm thinking it's from the early '60's or so, and not a fountain pen per se but still the nib style. And an Esterbrook, no less.
Frank, that's a Dipless from the 1940s! Its bakelite base is filled from a bottle of ink, and ink came in quarts then, but the pen itself has a reservoir above the screw-in nib that filled by capillary action up from the base. In the reservoir's base is a layer of very skinny plastic hairs that transmitted the ink from the bottle to the nib. Very cool indeed. Those nibs are great writers. Great story about the ballpoints; they lost that battle but won the war.
Enjoy it!

Tim
 
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f350ca

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Neat work Tim, machining takes all forms. I've made a number of fountain pens from the readily available kits, have one on the table here that I use daily, love the feel of a fountain pen.
Why do they cut the ribs in the section under the nib, Im guessing something to do with metering the ink flow.

Greg
 

tmenyc

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Greg,
got it in one. The key to how fountain pens work, any pen, really, is both holding the ink and letting it go. You clearly need both to have even flow when you want it and a reservoir that is safe inside and not on your clothes. The solution to the problem goes back to the earliest 1900s, and was refined into its modern form by around 1925. The solution is having ink travel through a very narrow corridor, a couple of hundredths of an inch down to 2-3 thou by the time it got to the nib. The first feeds were solid, flowing ink only through the space between nib and feed. Slits cut into them both managed ink flow and provided more ink. Modern feeds are larger in all three dimensions and have east-west slits, usually 2 or more north-south channels, and often a long channel cut the entire length, all for this purpose, although the greater size is also to support today's larger nibs.

Although my work and tastes are all in vintage, I'm a huge fan of hand-made fountain pens, and there are some magnificent craftsmen out there. Look up newtonpens.com , chesapeakepen.com, and scriptoriumpens.com . Shawn Newton now has a CNC in addition to a more manual lathe, but the others are one-by-one.

Tim
 
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