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POTD- PROJECT OF THE DAY: What Did You Make In Your Shop Today?

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Cadillac STS

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It’s not fair to ask a kid of 16, what do you want to do with your life?
They need exposure to as many career paths as possible, including the vocations.
In the 80's we had a man visit from Russia and we were talking about life where he is from including career choices. He said you decide when you are 13 or so what you will do for your job. I asked "What if you change your mind? That is really young to decide that." He said "That would be suspicious." As in government is monitoring people and watching for irregularities. It was one guys word so not sure if true.

I do know that in many places in the world it is like that, decide early and start out training in the area at an earlier age. That is one reason some countries win skills competitions like "Skills USA" where young people - late teens compete in the vocational skills worldwide, each country has a competition then the winners compete. My dad used to run the automotive competition for "Skills USA" formerly known as "VICA" and General Motors is the American sponsor. Dad said one time a kid from Korea turned in welding work so good the judges thought it must have come from a machine but he demonstrated the perfect skill. Kids have already been at it many years full time while other kids just started out and have High School to do also. If it works out great for the worker with early training like that.
 

GoceKU

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I'm very intrigued with this topic of trained vs untrained mechanic, i can say with confidence absolutely no mechanic has been to school around here, most of them have been helpers or floor sweepers in a mechanic business. And always get in over their head when working on modern cars. I do work 2 sometimes 3 jobs, one of which is a professor in an elementary school and the children often are reflection of their parents. In couple of years now i've never heard a child say i want to be a mechanic or a machinist so time will come when those skills will be very rare. Further proof is one of my previous jobs, Van Hool buses, no school needed, no skills needed, no criminal check, just willing to work for 300$ a month, and what can you expect.
 

Cadillac

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Idk what the cause is of the youth these days I think it’s acouple problems that I see. 1 is the interest and motivation of kids these days. I have a 6yr old boy that wants to be by my side all the time. I teach him everything I can and he soaks it up. Learned to ride his bike at 3 and enjoys being outside and exploring. I do not promote being on the iPad and limit to a hour a day if he’s good. My new neighbor has a 8yr old boy that for the past yr. we’ve seen him out maybe twice and talking to his father he says his boy like to stay inside and play games on the computer???
2nd would be schooling I’m 42 and when I was in HS they didn’t offer the shop classes as they use to. Only wood,and mechanic shop. They were all pushing for college but no help or direction. Yes kids should go to college and be the best they can but not everyone is gonna be a brain surgeon or a rocket scientist. You can make a comfortable living working with your hands in the trades
3rd are the parents! I see parents put their kids in front of a iPad to occupy them for hours like a babysitter. They don’t motivate them to go outside because they would have to go watch them. Their motivation is to occupy the kid so they can be on Facebook or twitter or whatever they do idk. Basically no parenting,discipline or direction.
At my job which I’ve had for 15yrs I am in charge of hiring mechanics for full time mechanics positions at local golf courses we maintain. Every year I go through 3-4 guys for various reasons. Don’t show up or when they wake up they come. Don’t care to show because mommy pays for everything. Finding kids to even do oil changes is tough. I’ve learned to look for retired guys that want some pay and free golf to work acouple hours a week. It’s been like that for at least 10yrs.
Thinking about it it all comes down to the parents. Teach them, motivate them, show them the way. Do Not rely on the schools to teach our kids. We should know are kids better than any counselor does, give them the tools to succeed, direct them as your parents did and watch them evolve into a mini you or even better than you could imagine!
 

Cadillac

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I agree kids don’t say I wanna be a mechanic or a carpenter or plumber. But I do know when I was very little I one day decided to take the snow blower apart for my dad. When he got home from work he was not a happy camper. Not mechanically inclined. I was removing the screws from the door hinges probably when I figured out lefty lucy. Did finish carpentry out of HS because I loved building stuff. Was great but ended up getting laid off every enter so I decided to change fields. Never thought I would be in the golf industry but it pays the bills well, keeps me employed all yr 40+ a week, winters are a rest time and I’m on a golf course half my day. There use to be trade specific programs at colleges for the industry but enrollment was so low they dropped the programs and now it’s near impossible to find qualified mechanics for the field.
 

dave_r_1

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IIRC, my cousins in Germany had to choose in the middle of grade school, if they wanted to go on the university schooling track, or trade school track, and their grades hinted strongly at which track they should choose... Back in the 70's here in Edmonton, AB, there were still shop classes and vocational high schools, but from what I can tell now, pretty much everything other than sports where you have a chance of significantly hurting your self or someone else has been phased out (and this had already begun when I was finishing school in the 80's).
 

Winegrower

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It’s hard to predict. My middle grandson is fascinated by everything mechanical. He’s 9 years old...from his birthday money he bought a HF gas engine. He figured out by himself how to get a gas tank hooked up and how to get it started. I think this is hilarious: He puts it in his red wagon, starts it, then pulls it around.

The kid is going to be an engineer, no question. As a counter example, his brother is a couple years older, just wants to play video games all day.

So, it depends. On what, who knows?
 

Janderso

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I went to High School in the early 70’s. Our middle and High school had outstanding shop facilities. Sheet metal, lathes, mills, welding stations, hand tools etc. Wood shop was equally impressive.
We did not have an auto shop though.
My boys are in their 30’s, one is a teacher and is broke. The other is an electrician. My electrician is almost making more than me.
I’m proud of both of them. My teacher is almost done with his Masters, that will help his pay check.

I think if I had to do it again, I would have gone the charter school route. Better parent involvement, less disciplinary problems.

My grand kids love Pa Pa’s shop. We will see, they are still very young.

Having to choose a career path at 13?? Oh my.
I’m 62, I figured out what I should have done with my life’s work in my mid 20’s, I just couldn’t figure out a way to make a living at it. So, like many of us, I go to work doing a job that pays the bills but is not stimulating.
I’ll retire ok, just a few more years.
 

dave_r_1

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My POTD turned out to be making some scrap metal.

I was trying to make this:IMG_1469.jpg

and I had drilled the two ends the correct size, but I managed to thread it at an angle. Since a 1/2" threaded rod needs to pass through the center of this tube (this is used to adjust a mower deck connected to the end of the threaded rod), it's scrap metal as the rod jams into the side of the tube.

Tomorrow, I'll try again, using the lathe to keep the tap parallel to the tube.
 

Suzuki4evr

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My cat destroyed the rope on her scratching post, so I had to replace it.
The lathe came in handy for wrapping all those loops around the post.
I just turned it by hand, pulling the rope tight every quarter turn.
The post was too long to use the turning center, so I chucked up a small reamer and held the post between it and the tailstock.
The block of wood was to tap the loops tight every 2 or 3 turns.

My hands are really tired. Stretching all those loops was strenuous.
I will not get any thank yous for this. There is no cat word for thank you.

View attachment 301794
"No cat words for thank you".You can definitely say THAT again. If they could speak they would rather say "What took you so long".:laughing:
 

mattthemuppet2

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Tomorrow, I'll try again, using the lathe to keep the tap parallel to the tube.
if you don't have one already a spring loaded tap guide is the bomb for tapping straight threads on the lathe. They're not much - $10 to 15 for a reasonable one. Put tap into tap handle, put tap guide into tailstock drill chuck, move spring loaded end up into the end of the tap hanlde until the end of the tap is resting in the hole. Then advance the guide until the spring loaded end is compressed. Turn tap handle as normal. Perfectly aligned tapped holes every time :)
 

dave_r_1

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Swing #2 at yesterdays POTD went better.

Used this setup for tapping the threads:
IMG_1471.jpg

Worked well (pipe wrench was to stop the work from turning), the resulting thread was straight.

Finished part (re-used the handle from the original part).
"IMG_1472.jpg

Now I just have to set up a reminder to work these adjusters on a regular basis. In past summers, I've adjusted them on a weekly basis for a specific job, but this summer, I don't have that job anymore, so it's just been mowing at the same height all the time. It's not a great design, as dirt, debris and water all will collect in the tube and just sit there rusting the pieces together.

Anyway, the mower is back in service again, and I didn't have to spend $200+ and wait a couple of weeks for the OEM parts. Success!
 

stioc

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Been busy making Harold's tool grinding rest in my other thread https://www.hobby-machinist.com/threads/building-harold-halls-simple-grinding-rest.79476 but thought I'd post the latest progress here too:

Leadscrews:


Threading the long leadscrew at 600 RPM by gripping the die stock- I don't recommend this...I had done things to make this as safe as possible (more details in the thread above).



and graduated dials, each line is .0013"


 

silverhawk

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While waiting for wood putty that was stained this morning to dry, I ran out to the "shop". Previously, a friend was making fun of me for my make-shift baton (3/16" stainless rod) when leading the music for a congregation (she kept calling it a "stick thingey" even though she knows what it is really called). I figured I had to up my game. So the trip to the shop was to grab some brass and turn a handle for that brass, then add a real point and a thread to the other end.



It was simple and easy, but it was also a nice break.
 

dbb-the-bruce

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Made a collet draw bolt for my dividing head from a hardware store bolt. Pretty simple, came out decent.

The thread is 3/8 16. I started with a monster bolt and turned it down. The bolt size was chosen so the head would be larger than the backside hole on the dividing head. I turned the head thin so that it clears the base of the dividing head when titled straight up.

I did find it difficult to get good surface finish from HHS bits when turning. I'm wondering if the methods and material of the mass produced hardware store bolts makes them crappy for turning or if it's my bit geometry & technique.

Regardless, the final result does the job and I can now use my collet set with my dividing head.

IMG_3571.JPG

-Dave B
 

kvt

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Finally able to get back in the shop for a little while before my surgery gets scheduled. Did a little cleaning and work on the Sattley Hit and miss engine.

Sattley flywheel

Trying to figure out how to insert a YouTube video here.
 

BGHansen

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POTD modifying the Harbor Freight 5-drawer tool chest for my Tormach 1100 mill. I’ve got a Tormach tool holder on the mill chip pan that holds 21 tools, and a couple of Tormach wooden holders for an additional 42. I had a couple of 30-position 5C collet holders that used to be on my Clausing lathe, but it was upgraded to a 72-position holder, so the old 5C holders were gathering dust. Figured they work great on the lid of the HF tool chest for holding the Tormach tools.

The 5C rack has a shade over 1.25” holes for the collets. Tormach’s TTS system uses tool holders with a ¾” shank. I had a 5’ length of 1.5” Delrin on hand, made up bushings to take the 1.25” holes down to 0.75”.

After the bushings were made, the tool chest lid gas struts were pulled and replaced with angle iron. The collet rack was set in place and mounting holes paint markered on the lid. Used a hole punch to knock in the mounting holes.

The 5C collets are heavy on the tail side, so they can be racked closer to vertical without falling out of the rack. The Tormach tool holders tend to be nose-heavy, so were all tipping down a little more than I’d like. Modified the side sheet metal pieces of the collet rack to a better angle, so now I can sleep at night.

Should work out great. Next big project for the mill will be making a full enclosure. I recently picked up a bunch of Creform tubing and fittings from Craig’s List. Plan on learning Fusion 360 during the winter and will make the stand one of my first design projects.


Thanks for looking, Bruce


BEFORE arrangement of my Tormach's tool chest
20190922_103936.jpg


Center drilled, 49/64" center hole, turned shoulder to ~1.27", and parted. Cleaned up the ends with a deburring tool.
20190921_123502.jpg
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20190921_124349.jpg
20190921_124736.jpg


Had a few bushings too tight to fit into the 5C rack. Used an expanding mandrel to mount them and take off a few thousandths.
20190921_165027.jpg


Transferred the 5C rack holes to the lid of the tool chest and punched holes with a Roper Whitney XX hand punch.
20190922_120842.jpg


Before and After side view of the rack mounted to the lid. I wasn't happy with the nearly flat angle the tools were at, so modified the sides of the rack to help gravity keep them in place.
20190922_124546.jpg
20190922_130003.jpg
20190922_132430.jpg


Rack in place on the lid and my Tormach's current set up. Full enclosure is in the near future.
20190922_140621.jpg
20190922_122957.jpg
 

BGHansen

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POTD was prototyping a flange bender for work. We have an Ergonomic issue on a part and need some mechanical advantage to help get the part properly seated. I took some rough measurements and made the prototype out of a 2 x 4 on my Tormach mill. Back to work tomorrow to see how it works. If okay, I’ll make up the final one from Delrin.


Thanks for looking, Bruce


This Tormach is making me lazy. Using a probe to find the corner of the prototype 2 x 4 block
20190920_165526.jpg

Still lazy, using the electronic tool setter to find the length of a deep-cut 1/2" end mill. Naturally, the CNC program needs to know the length of the tool so it cuts to the correct depth. It's really simple to use: Plug in the tool setter, change the PathPilot settings to ETS, go to the Probe tab in PP, type in a tool number, then click a button and the spindle drops until the ETS is tripped. For safety sake, I always manually trip the ETS ahead of time to make sure it's working.
20190921_101709.jpg

Prototype being cut
20190920_165655.jpg
20190920_165852.jpg
20190920_170121.jpg


The flange bender will will get a handle. PathPilot has a conversational routine for cutting a boss, so no 4-jaw lathe work required. Set the block square in the vise with a 1-2-3 block, probed the corner to set up the coordinates, then let the CNC take over.
20190920_170205.jpg


20190920_170337.jpg
20190921_114812.jpg

Final prototype. We'll see how it fits up Monday. Easy to make tweaks as required with the CNC.
20190921_114906.jpg
 

BGHansen

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POTD was mounting a couple of 18” long LED under-cabinet lights on my 37” Tennsmith shear. Love the tool, but it’s tough to see a scribed line between the shear bar and work clamp. There’s a shop light directly overhead, but my head casts a shadow when peeking over the work clamp. Plan was to mount the 18” lights on a couple of ½” – 13 threaded rods that project above the shear bar. There are compression springs on the rods; the nuts up top are used to adjust the height and tension of the work clamp. The clamp sets above the shear and comes down to clamp the work to the table before the shear bar hits the material.

Turned a couple of bushings from ¾” Delrin. Tapped one side ½”-13, the other 10-24. I had some scrap Walnut in my kindling bin, used that to mount the lights to. The lights have a couple of keyholes for mounting. Ran screws into the Walnut and slipped the lights in place.

Cut a couple of brackets to tie the Walnut board to the Delrin bushings. Didn’t show the operation, but cut them on the band saw and sanded to a smooth edge.

Really nice to flip on the light and have no problems seeing a scribed or pencil line on the work.


Thanks for looking, Bruce


Tough to see between the white hold-down clamp and the shear bar just behind.
20190915_144030.jpg

Making a couple of threaded bushings for mounting on the shear. Center drill, tap drill and tap a 1/2"-13 hole, then part
20190915_152502.jpg
20190915_152742.jpg
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20190915_153205.jpg

Flip the bushing, center drill, tap drill for a 10-24 thread, tap.
20190915_154008.jpg
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20190915_154148.jpg


LED lights mounted to the Walnut board. The Irish Spring soap is for the wood screws. Trick my dad taught me, use bar soap on the screws to lube them and not snap off as easily into the wood.
20190920_152658.jpg

Band sawed, sanded and drilled holes for the mounting brackets.
20190920_153243.jpg

Brackets, bushing, Walnut board and lights in place.
20190922_142514.jpg

20190920_154422.jpg

No problems at all seeing either ends of the shear's scale. My big head always cast a shadow and I was tired of using a flashlight to line up a mark on the work with the edge of the shear.
20190915_165425.jpg
 
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dave_r_1

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I'm repowering an outdoor vacuum/chipper I made to an effectively unknown brand motor of the same size that I picked up cheap from PrincessAuto.

The old motor, a B&S 900 series, was working ok but the air filter just wasn't up to being able to handle the amount of dust the vacuum generates, and would plug up pretty quickly. I rebuilt it last year, but again had the same problem, and it's just not worth spending about 50% of the cost of a new engine in parts to rebuild it.

Today I worked on getting the impeller properly mounted on the crankshaft. The old crank is 1" OD, with a 1/4" keyway, about 3" long, and gets slightly larger near motor, and the impeller slides onto the crankshaft until it hits that slightly larger part, and a bolt going into the end of the crank holds it in place. The new crank is the same overall length, but it's 1" for most of the length, without a larger bit near the engine , the last 3/4" of the crank is reduced in diameter to 7/8", and has a 3/16" keyway.

To make the impeller mount properly on the new crankshaft, I bought a 3/16-1/4 step key, and then made a spacer that goes over the end of the crankshaft, both to make that last 3/4" of the crank be 1", but also has an extra 1" of length to space the impeller the same distance from the engines mounting surface.

Pic of the spacer, installed:
IMG_1473.jpg

Also had to customize the gas tank a bit with a BFH so the chipper chute would clear it:
IMG_1474.jpg

Still to do, it make a new liner for the blower housing. I previously made one from 16 gauge steel after wearing a large hole in the housing, and it's also worn through in a spot, so I'll make another one from a strip of 3" x 1/8" flat steel I bought. I'll also have to figure out how to get a larger air filter mounted onto the engine, to avoid another early death of the engine.
IMG_1475.jpg
 

Cadillac STS

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I'm repowering an outdoor vacuum/chipper I made to an effectively unknown brand motor of the same size that I picked up cheap from PrincessAuto.

The old motor, a B&S 900 series, was working ok but the air filter just wasn't up to being able to handle the amount of dust the vacuum generates, and would plug up pretty quickly. I rebuilt it last year, but again had the same problem, and it's just not worth spending about 50% of the cost of a new engine in parts to rebuild it.

Today I worked on getting the impeller properly mounted on the crankshaft. The old crank is 1" OD, with a 1/4" keyway, about 3" long, and gets slightly larger near motor, and the impeller slides onto the crankshaft until it hits that slightly larger part, and a bolt going into the end of the crank holds it in place. The new crank is the same overall length, but it's 1" for most of the length, without a larger bit near the engine , the last 3/4" of the crank is reduced in diameter to 7/8", and has a 3/16" keyway.

To make the impeller mount properly on the new crankshaft, I bought a 3/16-1/4 step key, and then made a spacer that goes over the end of the crankshaft, both to make that last 3/4" of the crank be 1", but also has an extra 1" of length to space the impeller the same distance from the engines mounting surface.

Pic of the spacer, installed:
View attachment 302598

Also had to customize the gas tank a bit with a BFH so the chipper chute would clear it:
View attachment 302599

Still to do, it make a new liner for the blower housing. I previously made one from 16 gauge steel after wearing a large hole in the housing, and it's also worn through in a spot, so I'll make another one from a strip of 3" x 1/8" flat steel I bought. I'll also have to figure out how to get a larger air filter mounted onto the engine, to avoid another early death of the engine.
View attachment 302600
Could you make a snorkel of some kind and draw air from somewhere not so dusty when the machine runs?
 

dave_r_1

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Could you make a snorkel of some kind and draw air from somewhere not so dusty when the machine runs?
Yeah, I'm getting a separate canister-style filter, which will move the air intake a little further away from the bags, but when it's in use, the whole machine is enveloped in a big dust cloud
 

pontiac428

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Grinding is dirty. If you put a flange on the end of your vacuum with a 45 degree flare that opes to 2-3 duct diameters wide, you will get better capture efficiency. It would work even better attached to the wheel shroud. Unfortunately, neither will make it a clean process. I put a neodymium magnet on my grinder to catch the metal. It doesn't work for the abrasive, but that's the lesser of the evils.
 

GoceKU

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I've used an car air filter the big square ones they do the job very well and last decent time.
 
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