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POTD- PROJECT OF THE DAY: What Did You Make In Your Shop Today?

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Cadillac STS

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Yeah, I'm getting a separate canister-style filter, which will move the air intake a little further away from the bags, but when it's in use, the whole machine is enveloped in a big dust cloud
What about a long flexible plastic pipe 4-6 inches in diameter that you fold out and put the end 5 meters away? Just fold it up over the machine for transport or storage.
 

mattthemuppet2

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fixed a creaking problem on my bike that was driving me batty. 2 1/2h a day for 2 weeks of "eek, eek, eek" that was loud enough to make it embarassing to ride past school kids waiting for their bus. Had lots of time to think of a solution.

Problem - motor is not held in the frame in only one position, which allows it to shift and rub against the frame. You can see that the paint on the motor mounting pads has largely worn off and there's another worn patch just above the top one in the picture. The likely source of the noise.


the threaded ends of the bolts (drive side) had also started wallowing out the bolt holes, leaving "threads" in the softer material


The plan - bore out the drive side bolt holes to make delrin "top hat" bushings to press into the holes, keeping the bolts and motor away from the frame. On the other side, make longer top hat bushings that go through the motor, centering the bolts and space the motor away from the frame. Doing so would also require milling the thickness of the bushings (minus the considerable clearance from the factory) from the motor mounts on both sides.

First step, a piloted reamer/ boring tool out of scrap 01. The idea was to use both existing bolt holes to center the reamer and keep it perfectly aligned, then have it cut the new hole to a fixed ID. I've tried enlarging holes with a drill and it never comes out well.

Here's the tool, couple of hours work on the lathe, mill and with a file. The fattest end will also debur the hole :) Didn't bother hardening it as I figured it would be fine for the use and I was on a hard time limit - my ride in to work this morning!


in action


you can see the fretting marks on the far side where the motor is moving within the frame cradle. Tool worked well, really clean hole that was the same ID for all 3 holes.


Next step was machining down the motor mounts, after which I could work out the thickness of the bushings. As every single mounting point was a different thickness (~0.3mm from large to small) I split the motor and used the machined face of the case as a reference and clamped it to my mill table. First time using the clamp set, which was neat.


Then work out the amount to cut off the other side to get to the desired width, rebuild the motor then clamp it to the table using the 3 machined mounts as a reference surface. Clamping was a bit sketchy, but the cuts were small.


Widths came out to a range of 0.03mm, which was bloody fantastic.


Long top hat bushings, these go inside the motor where the bolts pass. Had to step ream out the bore as it was egg shaped - narrow at either end and widest in the middle where the case halves met. Probably something to do with casting the cases. These were a royal PITA to make, but eventually they fitted. Would have prefered a larger shoulder but I didn't have enough 1" delrin rod and I had 5ft of 1/2" delrin rod, so I used that instead


Measured again and made the top hat bushings for the other side, this was a failed one that came out too small


Ended up making the front one first and when I test fitted the motor there was more clearance than I liked. It was 0.15-0.2mm, as intended and down from 0.3-0.5mm as stock, but I reduced that to 0.1mm for the back two. No pictures of that as it was late and I was tired.

Finished product - you can see the larger top hat bushing on the right, but not the smaller but longer one on the left


This morning the first thing I said to my wife when I got to work was:

"Hello darkness, my old friend
I've come to talk with you again"

geddit?

Anyway, pleased as punch. A lot of work, but it came out just as I had planned, which is pretty satisfying. Only worry is that the motor will get hotter as it isn't directly connected to the frame any more. If that turns out to be a problem I can remake the longer top hat bushings out of alu instead.
 

dave_r_1

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What about a long flexible plastic pipe 4-6 inches in diameter that you fold out and put the end 5 meters away? Just fold it up over the machine for transport or storage.
That would work, but when it's used as a vacuum, it's moving around, and dragging a hose around would be a problem. I'm considering making a vertical extension for the air intake, but it would need some bracing to hold it in place.
 

dave_r_1

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Got my blower up and running, and I didn't make the spacer for the impeller wide enough, as the knife edge you see in the above post just catches on the edge of the branch input chute when the engine is running (but it clears it when turning the engine over by hand). So I made and installed a 3/16" wide spacer to move the impeller out that 3/16", and now it seems to be running fine. Didn't get a chance to test chipping branches, as it was too late when I got it done.
 

GoceKU

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This may sound funny but i spent 4-5 hours clearing my big work bench, it's been couple of months since last it's been clean. But i need to do some work on it and this is the result, i have some spilled paint to clean still.
IMG_20190925_200415.jpg
 

kvt

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Ok, Did some more work on the Sattley Hit and Miss engine. Head had problems, Someone welded it with what looks like nickel rod, THen tried to flatten out the face with a angle grinder. Left and uneven mess that did not seal real well. Thus some fun time for me. Did not get the major portion of the time trying to get it set up in the 4 jaw on video. But did finally get it set up and part of the work recorded

Hope you enjoy.

https://youtu.be/Kj6X4RpFX6M

Still have to figure how to get these things in here.
 

dave_r_1

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Tested the repowered blower from https://www.hobby-machinist.com/threads/potd-project-of-the-day-what-did-you-make-in-your-shop-today.67833/post-685396 and it worked ok, but thinner, not really dry branches would bend between the impeller and housing instead of getting chipped, so I think I need to reduce the width of the spacer I made a bit.

Also, I finally dug into rebuilding the hydro controllers for a walkbehind mower I have, that I'm making a brush attachment to use it during the winter for snow removal. They need rebuilding as both of them won't stay "neutral", I can adjust them to be natural, then use the machine for a couple minutes, and it will creep forward/backwords and/or turn left or right randomly. Naturally, these setups have no kind of drain, it's just unplug something and get some of the oil out, then unplug the rest and clean up the mess and oil oozes out from everywhere... I've got one of them torn apart and bagged/labelled (it's how I keep track of what bits get put where when I take things with lots of small parts apart).
 

mmcmdl

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If I'm bored tonight , a stainless wind chime will be in the works . ( just using up scrap material ) . :)
 

BGHansen

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POTD was a follow-up on the prototype Ergonomic /flange bender tool from a previous POTD post. I put the wooden prototype over the door part and needed to make a couple of tweaks before cutting the Delrin final tools. Here's the link to the original post:


Problem was the part that the “U” section slips over is wider at the base than at the spot where the tool pushes against. The tool rocked enough that it tended to slip off on the back side. Simple fix, lengthened one leg and added a radius “chunk” on the end so the point where it touches and reacts against on the back side are parallel to each other, so no slipping.

The tools will be used on both sides of the assembly line, so made five which gives us a few back-ups. The CNC routine is stored on my Tormach so no problem making more if need be.

Thanks for looking, Bruce


Block of Delrin in the Tormach 1100 cutting the new profile
20190924_192834.jpg

Secondary operation to cut a boss on the end which slips into a piece of tubing for a handle.
20190924_193917.jpg

Final flange bender / Ergo tool
20190924_193944.jpg

Made up 5 for our floor. We'd measured as high as 45 lbs. of effort to seat the part which is way over the Ergonomic limit of 20 lbs. The length of the handle maths out to a force of 8 lbs. at the end to get 45 lbs. at the reaction surface, so no sore thumbs for our Team Members.
20190926_075021.jpg

Front glass run channel for the Buick Enclave. The upper clip in the photo was tough to seat. Solution is the simple machine of a lever so no one goes home sore at the end of the day.
20190926_075121.jpg

Slip the tool over the glass run channel and give a little push on the end to seat the clip.
20190926_075039.jpg

20190926_075057.jpg
 

mmcmdl

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Definitely an upgrade from a quickfire ! :)
 

BGHansen

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POTD was making a cap for the end of a debugging tool. I was using the tool to deburr the Delrin flange benders from the POTD post above and noticed some of the bits on the floor (after my annual sweeping of the shop . . .). The cap had a hole in the end. Extra bits are stored in the handle. The tool neck length is adjustable, the cap probably broke from me pushing down and driving the arbor through the bottom of the cap.

Chucked up a piece of 1” 6061 aluminum and turned a new cap. Steps are in the photos below. Figured I’d go with aluminum instead of plastic so I don’t blow a hole in the cap again.

Thanks for looking, Bruce


Blew a hole in the bottom of the deburring tool
20190928_153417.jpg

Facing a 1" aluminum round
20190928_153617.jpg

Cut a shoulder for the 0.872 x 10 tpi thread
20190928_154213.jpg

Center drill
20190928_154354.jpg

1/2" clearance hole in the cap
20190928_154535.jpg

Boring the hole to a flat bottom
20190928_155017.jpg

Relieved the base of the thread with a parting tool
20190928_155409.jpg

Scratch pass, verified 10 tpi with a thread gauge
20190928_160420.jpg

Last pass.
20190928_161528.jpg

Pre-parting the end of the cap in prep for knurling
20190928_161727.jpg

Knurling the cap with a Rockwin Knurlmaster hand knurling tool
20190928_162145.jpg

Put a little chamfer on the cap edges
20190928_162323.jpg

Parting off the cap
20190928_162542.jpg

Set up on my Clausing lathe for facing the end with a 5 deg. angle. No DRO on the Clausing; measure movement in the Z-axis with a 2" travel dial indicator.
20190928_163525.jpg

Cut the 5 deg. angle on the end of the cap
20190928_163534.jpg

Could of sworn there were 4-6 bits in the deburring tool . . .
20190928_164048.jpg

Better than new
20190928_164118.jpg
 

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Chuck K

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Today I started making a crosslide nut for the 9A. I cut a piece out of a bronze plate that I had in my scrap collection. Roughed it out on the mill. Mounted it in a 4 jaw bored and threaded it. I sized it to the unworn part of the crosslide screw, up near the gear.20190929_131515.jpg20190929_132454.jpg20190929_132708.jpg20190929_141026.jpg
Then I cut a screw to fit the nut. I still have to finish shaping the nut and attach the new screw....but it's time to watch football.
 

BGHansen

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POTD was making a punch and die for my better half. She makes Christmas ornaments for family each year, this year she’s taking on copper enameling. I think it involves cutting the various pieces (from copper) to size, then heat and sprinkle enamel dust on top and heat it to melt/flow the enamel. The pieces are soldered together after the fact. I’m thinking clean the surfaces, flux and set pounded flat solder pieces in place. Then heat the assembly on a hot plate until the solder flows.

Anyway, one of the designs is a Christmas tree with ornaments. She drew up bulbs at 7/16” diameter for decorating the enameled tree. Figured the easiest way to make 7/16” copper circles is to punch them.

I have at least 50 different punches and dies for my Roper Whitney #218 punch press, but alas, no 7/16”. On top of that, most commercial punches have a point on them to align on a prick-punched hole. Usually you want the hole, in this case we want the slug so the standard punch would dimple the center.

Small dies for the RW #218 press are 1 ¼” diameter, 5/8” thick. Punches are either ½” or 1” diameter. Started with the die. Turned a piece of 1.275 drill rod down to 1.249”. Then center drilled and drilled a clearance hole. Then reamed to size. For the most part (pun intended) I don’t struggle with parting on the lathe. But for drill rod I usually go to the band saw.

Chucked up the die with the back side out and faced. Then drilled a ¾” hole to depth as the thickness of the die where the punch passes through is generally around 0.20”. Knocked off the sharp edges and number punched the size.

Used a piece of ½” drill rod for the punch. Faced and turned down for 0.008” clearance to the die. The harder the material, the more clearance is required between the punch and die. The formula I go by is material thickness times the material factor. For stainless, it’s 0.2, CRS is 0.15, Aluminum is 0.1. I figured copper would be close to aluminum, but also might punch steel so went with the calculation: 0.15 x 0.060” thick for 0.009” clearance. I cheated just a bit smaller as her copper is 0.050” thick.

Band sawed the punch and flipped it in the chuck. Faced and turned a taper on the top end. The RW #218 has a clamp screw to keep the punch from turning. The tapered area is where the clamp screw will hit, so if any burr is raised it won’t affect the diameter of the shank of the punch. Number punched the size on the punch.

Heat treating was done in a Thermolyne muffle furnace. Took the steel to 1500 F, then quenched in motor oil. Cleaned off the scale and tempered to 460 F.

Punch and die work really well. No problem shearing annealed 0.050” copper.

Thanks for looking, Bruce


Facing the die steel
20190929_111043.jpg
Turing to diameter (1.249")
20190929_111454.jpg
Center drill for the punch hole
20190929_111642.jpg
Drilled a 27/64" hole (I usually go about 0.015" under the reamer size or 7/16" in this case)
20190929_111817.jpg
Reaming with a 0.4375" reamer
20190929_112049.jpg
Chamfering the sharp edge
20190929_112219.jpg
Cutting a relief on the side for number punching. Also, this is the area where the die holder has a set screw to hold the die in place.
20190929_112754.jpg
Sawing off the die
20190929_113140.jpg
Chucked back up - facing the bottom of the die
20190929_113632.jpg
Let's see how close I can get a tool to the chuck jaws . . . Chamfering the bottom of the die.
20190929_113723.jpg
Drilling a 3/4" clearance hole
20190929_114152.jpg
Commercial die from Roper Whitney.
20190929_114203.jpg
Number punching the die size
20190929_115303.jpg

Turned the punch from 1/2" drill rod. Was targeting 0.429" to give 0.008" clearance to the die.
20190929_120621.jpg
Relieving an area to number punch the size
20190929_120902.jpg
Sawing off the punch
20190929_121153.jpg
Facing the top of the punch
20190929_121422.jpg
Cutting a taper where the punch press's punch holder clamps the punch in place with a set screw
20190929_122156.jpg
Number punching the size
20190929_122809.jpg
Hardening to 1500 F
20190929_130033.jpg
Tempering at 460 F
20190929_134835.jpg
Finished punch and die
20190929_135627.jpg

My wife's pattern on a sheet of copper.
20190929_140902.jpg
Punching out the Christmas tree bulbs
20190929_141037.jpg
Sharp punch and die make short work of 0.050" copper
20190929_141607.jpg
 

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mattthemuppet2

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my worries about lack of motor cooling on my bike due to the mods I made here turned out to be justified. Before any waste heat from the motor or controller was conducted to the frame and then radiated/ convected away. With the delrin bushings the only surface for heat loss was that of the motor itself which wasn't enough = very hot motor.

The fix - remake the longer top hat bushings out of alu, with a nice big flange for contact with the frame


was experimenting with step turning to reduce chatter, which is why the finish wasn't great on a couple. Really helped as these are 11mm at the small diameter and 45mm long.

All the mistakes I made with the first set paid off and they fit tightly without any modification


the one at the bottom has less space to fit in, so the flange is smaller in diameter.

in position


took up a little bit more slack between the motor and frame, to the extent that the lower mount shown had to be worked into position and pinned with a bolt before moving the rest of the motor in position. You can see the bushing on the left with a bit of leftover grease on it (aim was to help with thermal transfer) and the original delrin bushing on the right.

Seemed to work really well this morning, motor was noticeably cooler. Still warm to the touch, but not much more than if it had been left sitting in the sun. Big difference compared with before where it was almost too hot to touch. Also seemed to have stiffened the bottom of the bike up a bit, which is a nice plus.
 

extropic

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Matt,
Nice job on the aluminum bushings.
I suggest that you consider coating the bushings (all surfaces) with an anti-seize compound. This would be primarily to keep moisture out and to slow corrosion. The high solids content typical in anti-seize compounds might even improve the thermal performance.
 

mattthemuppet2

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thanks! For the coating, is this because of potential corrosion? I did think about anodising them but didn't have time and the garage was too hot. They did get a good coating of thermal grease (zinc oxide) before going into the motor - you can just see some of the white goop that's squeezed out from behind the bushing - and the bushing/ frame junction got a coating of marine grease. No idea how much stayed there, but some did hopefully. Fingers crossed that should keep any corrosion from where it might cause problems, though I'll find out in 6mths or so when it's next time for a gear greasing and bearing check in the motor.
 

extropic

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Yes, my primary concern was corrosion. The thermal grease might do everything you need.
 

Franko

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I just finished a project today.
My client needed a device to rotate a studio monopod around a fixed center.

First, I had to make a track.
I glued two pieces of 3/4" baltic birch together and made a fixture to carve them in a perfect radius with a router and 2" straight bit.

IMG_1313.JPG

Then, a base to mount the track on a sheet of 3/4" birch plywood.
Then it was time to make a trolley to attach to the base of the monopod.
!" ball bearing wheels and stand-offs to mount on a 1/4" plate of aluminum.

IMG_1317.JPG

IMG_1318.JPG

IMG_1319.JPG

Then I mounted the trolley on the base of the monopod.

IMG_1324.JPG

Here is the finished product. I had to devise wheels that would keep the monopod square sitting on different levels.
Dowels on the ends are stops at 45º right and left.
All the wood is protected with two coats of water-based polyurethane floor coating.
The client is happy and will reward me with money. I like money.
I also like having something to do.

IMG_1320.JPG
 

extropic

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Franko,
Nice job. I'm curious about the wheels/bearings that you used. They don't look like skateboard wheels to me. Did you make the up custom or, if commercial items, please indicate a source so I can do some research for a future project of my own. Thanks.
 

Franko

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Extropic, I searched Amazon for 1" wheels. They turned out to be the very first hit. They are great little ball-bearing wheels. They came on the coolest little casters you ever saw. And reasonable at $9.99.
They are available in 1", 2", and 3" sizes.

71ERPfa-gUL._SL1200_.jpg

Here's a link.
 

Cadillac STS

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POTD was a follow-up on the prototype Ergonomic /flange bender tool from a previous POTD post. I put the wooden prototype over the door part and needed to make a couple of tweaks before cutting the Delrin final tools. Here's the link to the original post:


Problem was the part that the “U” section slips over is wider at the base than at the spot where the tool pushes against. The tool rocked enough that it tended to slip off on the back side. Simple fix, lengthened one leg and added a radius “chunk” on the end so the point where it touches and reacts against on the back side are parallel to each other, so no slipping.

The tools will be used on both sides of the assembly line, so made five which gives us a few back-ups. The CNC routine is stored on my Tormach so no problem making more if need be.

Thanks for looking, Bruce


Block of Delrin in the Tormach 1100 cutting the new profile
View attachment 302871

Secondary operation to cut a boss on the end which slips into a piece of tubing for a handle.
View attachment 302872

Final flange bender / Ergo tool
View attachment 302873

Made up 5 for our floor. We'd measured as high as 45 lbs. of effort to seat the part which is way over the Ergonomic limit of 20 lbs. The length of the handle maths out to a force of 8 lbs. at the end to get 45 lbs. at the reaction surface, so no sore thumbs for our Team Members.
View attachment 302874

Front glass run channel for the Buick Enclave. The upper clip in the photo was tough to seat. Solution is the simple machine of a lever so no one goes home sore at the end of the day.
View attachment 302877

Slip the tool over the glass run channel and give a little push on the end to seat the clip.
View attachment 302875

View attachment 302876
Does the Path Pilot have a routine that would let you write something on those in the Delrin like "BGHansen"? Both sides on the long part.

Hope the company knows you are helping out. I recall GM used to have a deal where if you thought of something in the factory that saved them money you would be given a check for one year of savings. For example one guy suggested that if a long drive shaft got ruined in manufacture they could cut it off and use it as a short drive shaft for a smaller car saving buying a drive shaft and saving discarding the flawed one.
 
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