[4]

POTD- PROJECT OF THE DAY: What Did You Make In Your Shop Today?

[3]
[10] Like what you see?
Click here to donate to this forum and upgrade your account!

BGHansen

H-M Supporter - Gold Member
H-M Supporter - Gold Member ($25)
Joined
Nov 23, 2014
Messages
1,216
Does the Path Pilot have a routine that would let you write something on those in the Delrin like "BGHansen"? Both sides on the long part.

Hope the company knows you are helping out. I recall GM used to have a deal where if you thought of something in the factory that saved them money you would be given a check for one year of savings. For example one guy suggested that if a long drive shaft got ruined in manufacture they could cut it off and use it as a short drive shaft for a smaller car saving buying a drive shaft and saving discarding the flawed one.
PathPilot has a pretty easy to use Engraving tab. Pick a font, type a line of text (need multiple files which can be merged into one for multiple lines), give it a location, character height, depth of cut, feed rate, tool number and a Z-height for clearance. Then write to a file which you then load and run the routine. Good idea, really simple to do.

GM has a Suggestions program that pays 20% of the annual savings on an ideas with a tangible savings. Max payment is $20K for an individual, $25K for a team award. Always fun to award one of those to someone on the floor (gave out 2 of them this year). We also have a recognition program between salaried peers. We had a problem with puckers in our door seals that I worked with our Team Members to get resolved. New process and part changes were documented in the Job Element Sheet. Had an engineer from the CAMI plant in Canada ask for some help, so sent him copies of our JES and background on what we did to fix it. Got some recognition dollars from their staff for helping out. My leadership here did the same for the Ergo tool.

Amazing what we pay for tools like this one. Outside job shop quote was something like $250 each. The routines each took about 2 1/2 minutes to run because I wasn't pushing the Tormach. Only did a 0.25" DOC at 40 ipm feed rate with a 1/2" end mill. The load meter on the spindle motor didn't even move when it started cutting. Someone a little more aggressive than me would have the routines run in under a minute. Of course, a job shop has to pay for the building, tooling, equipment, tool maker, etc. I could see doing this type of thing in retirement, but then my hobby would become a job . . .

Bruce
 

Radials

H-M Supporter - Gold Member
H-M Supporter - Gold Member ($25)
Joined
Feb 7, 2018
Messages
78
A lathe carriage indicator holder has been on my short list of things to make. I designed this one around some steel I already had on hand.
IMG_6830.JPG
I repurposed a plate from a former project to create a way to orientate the holder blank up at 45 degrees to mill out the bed way clamp. The blank will rest on the 3 dowel pins and clamped together in the vise.

IMG_6834.JPG
Shown here milling the bed way clamp.

Blue Group.JPG
The finished machined holder and clamp both before and after bluing.

IMG_6849.jpg
All done and installed. I'm very happy with the finished project.

IMG_6850.jpg
 
Last edited:

White wax

Newbie
Registered
Joined
Sep 28, 2019
Messages
5
It is infact a desert rose No clue the name.
A lathe carriage indicator holder has been on my short list of things to make. I designed this one around some steel I already had on hand.
View attachment 303239
I repurposed a plate from a former project to create a way to orientate the holder blank up at 45 degrees to mill out the bed way clamp. The blank will rest on the 3 dowel pins and clamped together in the vise.

View attachment 303240
Shown here milling the bed way clamp.

View attachment 303238
The finished machined holder and clamp both before and after bluing.

View attachment 303241
All done and installed. I'm very happy with the finished project.

View attachment 303242
It is infact a desert rose No clue the name.
Thanks for the answer. I stayed in a hot province (Limpopo) in South Africa until two years ago and had a small nursery in the backyard with about 5,000 of them. I had to sell them all but about seven managed to get on the truck and living in a very cold province now. I replaced that hobby now for working with the lathe??!?? It is Adenium Obesium.
 

Attachments

tmenyc

H-M Supporter - Gold Member
H-M Supporter - Gold Member ($25)
Joined
Oct 18, 2018
Messages
262
Had a good day in the shop today. The reason I have a lathe is to fabricate replacement parts for vintage fountain pens, from their original materials, which I described here some weeks ago when I made my first sac nipple from Delrin, clearly not an original material. Today, I made one in ebonite, black hard rubber, as they were originally made. Ebonite is a treat to turn and bore, the only issue being its softness and absence of rigidity; makes Delrin feel hard! So, it was great practice working close to the chuck, even with the carriage powered. Boring also turned to be very easy; I was able to bore to within .002 of my target, with the Micro100 BB180750 carbide boring tool in my homemade boring sleeve. I also bored celluloid, the amber part, to make room for the added sac nipple. Equally easy. The chips in the second picture are ebonite on top and celluloid below. They built up really fast while turning, and I was so close to the chuck I couldn't see, so didn't cut deeper than .010 each pass. I think I'll turn these left-handed from now one. The third picture shows the new sac nipple friction fit into the existing section, which I had bored to take the extra part. This was my last practice run, since the next one I'll do will be from a 1930 Waterman 92, an early celluloid pen with ebonite fittings.
48855154288_6673d099ba_e.jpg48855710442_4d0f8ab9ff_e.jpg48855511581_188d7a233f_e.jpg

Mikey, the square tool worked incredibly well on the soft material. Thanks for all your patient teaching!

Tim
 

mksj

Active User
H-M Supporter - Gold Member ($25)
Joined
Jun 12, 2014
Messages
2,265
Needed to make a micrometer stop for a control systems that I am sending out, seems that the manufacture is out for some time. In the past I made these slightly different with the adjustment knob in the middle of the block, but in this case I made it similar to the stock micrometer stop. Body is aluminum, foot and all other hardware are steel. The threaded shaft is 10 mm and has a 0.50" - 20 pitch threaded section so 0.05" per revolution. Normally I engrave the increments, but not really needed when used with the proximity stop. Might be done at a later date. Also the last micrometer stop I pressed in a metal female thread section, as aluminum can gall but seemed to be ok in this case with close tolerance threads. The micrometer knob position is fixed by a groove and an allen screw underneath with the head trimmed down, the knob shaft has a 1/8" pin through it which slides in a shaft groove to rotate the shaft. Always takes a bit longer then you think, took most of the day. Would look nice anodized, but not going that route.

20191008_120503.jpg
20191008_131807.jpg
Comparison to stock micrometer, some slight dimensional changes and different hardware.
20191008_133553.jpg20191008_132909.jpg
 

dave_r_1

Active Member
Registered
Joined
Feb 3, 2016
Messages
494
I've used a BR600 for years, and after a couple of years, I realized it would help if the nozzle was closer to the ground for me (I'm 6'5"), but for whatever reason, the way Stihl joins their nozzle parts, and the nozzle parts they sell, you can't just insert an extension onto it. So, I tried a gluing an extension onto the end of the nozzle, but that only worked for a short time, likely due to both extreme cold (-30C and colder) and stress (from the tip hitting various things). After gluing it together a couple of times, I switched to using pop rivets to make the extension, and that worked great.

I switched a couple of years ago to a Husqvarna 580BTS, as it has significantly more blowing power, and as a bonus, I could just buy an additional middle section for the blower tube, and it was a good length for use (perhaps a couple inches too long, but still WAY better than 12" too short). The downsides for the 580BTS for me are that it's much louder than the BR600, the kill switch wires break regularly so I have to use the choke to kill the engine (breaks right as it comes out of the control due to flexing as you use it), and the offset control from the tube causes pain in my elbow when I use it a lot.

I just recently bought the BR800CS, and like the BR600, the blower tube is ridiculously short for me.

Here's a pic of the 580BTS (left), BR600 (center) and BR800CS (right, with original tube, but it is missing a short tip at the end). Also, there's new blower tube I bought to use as an extension to the existing tube (it has the tip removed from the BR800CS).
IMG_1495.jpg
I removed the whole tube assembly from the BR800CS so I would work on it on my bench, as well as access the inside of the tube, as the end section doesn't come out the front.

Connecting the outlet end of the existing tube to the inlet of the new tube was actually pretty straightforward, as the outlet end is tapered a bit. So, I first measured to just past where the ridge on the new tube was, where pop rivets could be put flat against the tube:
IMG_1498.jpg
Then after marking how the two tubes overlapped, I measured the outlet of the original tube 1/4" past where the pop rivets will go, marked it with tape and then cut the end off using an angle grinder with a thin cutoff wheel:
IMG_1496.jpg
IMG_1497.jpg
I used Aluminum rivet/aluminum mandrel, 3/16 diameter, 3/8 head, 7/16" under head pop rivets, with backing washers for holding them together. I picked using aluminum pop rivets instead of steel mandrel ones, because the tubes are plastic and the steel pop rivets take a lot of force to "pop", and it might cause damage to the plastic from being squeezed too hard.
IMG_1499.jpg
While I have long arms, they are a little too big to reach into the tube to put the backing washers onto the pop rivets, so I needed to use a part-grabber tool to put them on:
IMG_1501.jpg
I lined up the tubes, drilled & riveted one side, then drilled & riveted the opposite side, then worked my way around the tube, installing 12 rivets in total:
IMG_1502.jpg
Finally, a comparison shot of the fully extended new tube vs the other machines:
IMG_1503.jpg
Now, it's probably a little too long, but I can use the adjustment mechanism to shorten it to what is just right for me. From waving it around a bit, it seems to be attached firmly and won't readily break.

As a downside vs how I lengthened the BR600 tube, if any part of the blower tube needs replacing (other than the short tip at the end), I'll need to drill out the rivets and remove the extension, as all the other pieces (tightening screw [the orange part you see], clamp [what the orange part squeezes], and rear part of the tube) need to go forward over the front tube, and they can't go over of the ridge on the tail end of the extension. If I do need to take it apart, I'll probably grind down that ridge and see if I can then slide it through.
 

wayfarergx

Swarf
Registered
Joined
Oct 9, 2019
Messages
1
Well, last weekend I cleaned up and tested 16x 240V electric motors (from 3/4 to 3hp) for sale and checked another 12x matching and unused 3ph motors. I had one dead one, and several I have projects for. I was originally after two motors and after looking at the prices for new, I stumbled across an auction and won 34 used motors for less than the two new ones. They're pump motors from a food processing factory and have been looked after well. I felt like a kid in a lolly shop.
Then yesterday I was given a free treadmill which I've "deconstructed". A DC motor, a lift motor and nice bunch of fasteners, knobs and trims. I think I'll use the motor for an old wood lathe I am restoring


Sent from my SM-N960F using Tapatalk
 

stioc

Brass
Registered
Joined
Feb 22, 2017
Messages
540
Ground a perfect 90 degree shaving edge onto my scraper. Band aids not included.
Nice! With your recent big iron acquisitions I think there's a KO Lee grinder out there somewhere with your name on it. Then you can sell this one- and as coincidences go...I happen to like that smurf blue color :D
 

Chuck K

Active User
H-M Supporter - Gold Member ($25)
Joined
Mar 1, 2013
Messages
1,021
Today I started making a crosslide nut for the 9A. I cut a piece out of a bronze plate that I had in my scrap collection. Roughed it out on the mill. Mounted it in a 4 jaw bored and threaded it. I sized it to the unworn part of the crosslide screw, up near the gear.View attachment 302928View attachment 302929View attachment 302930View attachment 302931
Then I cut a screw to fit the nut. I still have to finish shaping the nut and attach the new screw....but it's time to watch football.
I finished my screw and nut for the 9a. I used bearing mount locktite on the screw as well as pinning it. I'm giving the locktite a day to setup before reassembling the crosslide. I thought I had a pic of the finished nut...I'll have to post more pics tomorrow.


Sent from my SM-G930V using Tapatalk
 

GoceKU

Bronze
Registered
Joined
Jul 14, 2017
Messages
1,046
Couple weeks back i bought a 4 jaw chuck, for my lathe, it come incomplete, it was missing one keeper. So i decided to make it, i have a square stock in that size but wanted to make it from better quality steel. So i started with a casting with about 5-60 rockwell hardness, machined the outside, then drilled and bore it, all with carbide tools, then i marked it put it in my bench vice and cut it on all the corners with a 4" angle grinder. Now this check is complete and i can start cleaning it and getting it ready for installation.
IMG_20190929_093057.jpgIMG_20191010_154419.jpgIMG_20191010_154704.jpgIMG_20191010_201254.jpg
 

Chuck K

Active User
H-M Supporter - Gold Member ($25)
Joined
Mar 1, 2013
Messages
1,021
I finished my screw and nut for the 9a. I used bearing mount locktite on the screw as well as pinning it. I'm giving the locktite a day to setup before reassembling the crosslide. I thought I had a pic of the finished nut...I'll have to post more pics tomorrow.


Sent from my SM-G930V using Tapatalk
I spent about an hour grinding a shim, installing it, removing it, grinding another 0.00025 until I got the fit I wanted on the dial. Everything works nice. About 0.001 backlash.


Sent from my SM-G930V using Tapatalk
 
[5] [7]
Top