POTD- PROJECT OF THE DAY: What Did You Make In Your Shop Today?

Downunder Bob

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Today on my way back from skopje my car blow a power steering hose, it made a spectacular smoke cloud, almost caught fire and i had to drive it back without power steering when i got back i made me this a barbed fitting on my lathe and installed it, filed the system with fresh dexron 2 and its fixed. The funny thing is that my mechanic wanted couple hundred $ and said i need to wait a week for a new hose, pump and reservoir. I'm sure he'll find a sucker to take his money but won't be me.
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An excellent repair, I expect you are keeping your local mechanic poor with your skills, you're probably a better mechanic. I like the way that as soon as you blow a hose you have to replace the pump. They are the same here with A/C units, blow a hose and you have to replace the compressor and whatever else they can screw you for. I know one guy has about a ton of A/C compressors, he admits nothing wrong with most of them. I wanted the 12V clutch from one, asked him how much, he just gave a complete compressor with clutch.
 
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NortonDommi

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A great idea, the big brands will resist it as much as they can. I would suspect they would even embed a chip or two in components so that they don't play well with other brands. It will of course work, because the ISO standard will make sure it does, but it will work within limits.

Many years ago when video cameras were quite new, there was a multitude of batteries even within a brand one battery would not fit another camera. Some enterprising person came out with a set of adaptor plates, I bought a set one time while in Singapore, gave me much more versatility.

The same thing should happen with cordless tools. A mate and I often work together but we have different brands of tools, which is great in one way, we never get our tools mixed up, but it's an absolute pain, in that we can't share batteries, and or chargers. Both our tool sets are fairly new so we don't have any dead bits yet with which to make our own conversions, but come the day, look out Makita and Milwaukee.
This is the video I watched but as said I really think we need an ISO description.
Free the cordless world!
 

GoceKU

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An excellent repair, I expect you are keeping your local mechanic poor with your skills, you'r [probably a better mechanic. I like the way that as soon as you blow a hose you have to replace the pump. They are the same here with A/C units, blow a hose and you have to replace the compressor and whatever else they can screw you for. I know one guy has about a ton of A/C compressors, he admits nothing wrong with most of them. I wanted the 12V clutch from one, asked him how much, he just gave a complete compressor with clutch.
The smart mechanics stopped competing with me and when they get in trouble they call me, the not so smart ones simply ignore me. When i'm too busy i take my cars but almost always regret it. They somehow manage to mess up even simple things like oil changes, striped drain plugs, cross threaded oil filters, cracked windscreens things i could not think off.
 

rwm

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I love the battery adapter idea. I recently bought the adapter that Dewalt makes so you can use 20v Li batteries with some of the old 18v tools. For some reason this does not work for the 18v bandsaw? Does anyone know why? Most of the other 18v tools are fine.
Robert
 

projectnut

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Today on my way back from skopje my car blow a power steering hose, it made a spectacular smoke cloud, almost caught fire and i had to drive it back without power steering when i got back i made me this a barbed fitting on my lathe and installed it, filed the system with fresh dexron 2 and its fixed. The funny thing is that my mechanic wanted couple hundred $ and said i need to wait a week for a new hose, pump and reservoir. I'm sure he'll find a sucker to take his money but won't be me.
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Not to be a downer, but there's a huge difference between a commercial shop making a repair they need to guarantee for some period of time, and a DIY repair. I admire your skills and ingenuity, but no commercial shop is going to take the chance that a repair of this nature is going to last. In most cases it's the hose that failed not the fitting. Just plugging a new fitting into the same deteriorated, worn hose isn't something a shop would guarantee would last for any period of time.

I was in the repair business for many years, and can tell you from experience there are customers that expect that once they pay for a repair, any repair, they expect that repair and anything associated with it to last forever. If there are future problems, even those well beyond the warranty period some customers expect the problem to be resolved at no additional cost.

I can relate to you a somewhat similar scenario: Many years ago a "customer" stopped into my shop with a 1965 Pontiac that was running poorly. I removed the air cleaner and could hardly see the carburetor for all the crud and gunk. The most obvious problem was that the choke was stuck almost completely closed.

I recommended the carb be removed and rebuilt. The customer being too cheap wanted me to just clean the choke plate and linkage. At his request I sprayed down the carb with cleaner and eventually got enough crud off to allow the choke to open. I didn't charge any labor, just the $3.95 for the spray can of cleaner.

That was the last I saw the person for nearly a year. At about the 1 year mark he rolled into the shop again. This time he was irritated and confrontational. He handed me a bill for $235.00 claiming that I owed him that much due to the faulty "rebuild" I'd done on the carburetor. He claimed that before I "rebuilt" the carb he had been getting 12 mph, but since the "rebuild" the mileage had dropped to 8 mpg. The bill was for the difference in the cost of gas since the carb had been "rebuilt".

When I asked to see the receipt he showed me the one for the can of cleaner. I refused to pay the amount he was asking and told him to leave. His next statement was that he would return with his lawyer to collect the money. Needless to say he never returned, and I never paid him $235.00. The point is that there are some people who expect that once a car is brought to a shop that shop is responsible for any current or future problems regardless of whether or not the shop did any work on the car.

I'm not putting you or anyone else in that group. What I am saying is that no shop is willing to make DIY repairs when they know somewhere along the line someone is going to try to make them responsible for that repair in perpetuity.
 

finsruskw

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Most hydraulic shops near me all have signs posted stating no fittings will be installed on used hoses.
 

mmcmdl

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st hydraulic shops near me all have signs posted stating no fittings will be installed on used hoses.
That would be like taking a shower and not changing underwear ! :grin: Who would re-use hoses ? :dunno:
 

GoceKU

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Not to be a downer, but there's a huge difference between a commercial shop making a repair they need to guarantee for some period of time, and a DIY repair. I admire your skills and ingenuity, but no commercial shop is going to take the chance that a repair of this nature is going to last. In most cases it's the hose that failed not the fitting. Just plugging a new fitting into the same deteriorated, worn hose isn't something a shop would guarantee would last for any period of time.
Projectnut, i fully understand you and those kind of people are everywhere. But here we have a different problem, here even the main dealerships have no properly train staff, they hire people of the street that put a rag in their back pocket and call them self mechanics, no education, no training and after a few years they get self confidence and become reckless and overworked to the point that they start to make big mistakes every day and all of them have a big sign saying we don't take no responsibility about any damaged we do and no warranties, i've had a windscreen fall off when emergency braking, 2 months after it was installed and the shop used clear bathroom silicone to glue it in. Went there they denied they have ever worked on my car even after i showed them my receipt. So my mechanic did not even take in account no warranties, i know is hard to understand this but i leave in a very small country with questionable justice system. About the hydraulic shops, here they don't care, i actually went to a friend's shop and pressed it myself.
 

projectnut

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I do understand that there are lots of businesses that hire under educated staff, and have few if any scruples. Your situation sounds much the same as it did here in the 1960's and even later. I got into the auto business in the early 1970's just as NAISE (National Institute for Automotive Service Excellence) came into being. This institute was the first organization to test and certify technicians in all fields of automotive and truck repair. To get ahead of the game I took the certification tests as early as 1974. At that time I had to pass the tests in 8 different categories to become a Certified Master Technician. Times have changed a bit since then The name of the institute has now been shortened to ASE, and there are additional categories available (Compressed natural gas certification, and Light Duty Hybrid/Electric vehicle specialist certification among them) that didn't exist when I became a master technician. I recertified several times over the years, but finally let them expire in 1996. At that time my day job required up to 200 travel days per year, and there just wasn't enough time to attempt to keep up on a career I had left behind.

At first there were few if any believers in the system. As time went on it became more and more popular. Now it's to the point that no reputable garage or dealership will hire anyone that isn't certified in one or more of the disciplines. I'm sure there are still some bozo's out there doing things they shouldn't. However they are now a small minority of those working in the field.
 
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NortonDommi

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I do understand that there are lots of businesses that hire under educated staff, and have few if any scruples. Your situation sounds much the same as it did here in the 1960's and even later. I got into the auto business in the early 1970's just as NAISE (National Institute for Automotive Service Excellence) came into being. This institute was the first organization to test and certify technicians in all fields of automotive and truck repair. To get ahead of the game I took the certification tests as early as 1974. At that time I had to pass the tests in 8 different categories to become a Certified Master Technician. Times have changed a bit since then The name of the institute has now been shortened to ASE, and there are additional categories available (Compressed natural gas certification, and Light Duty Hybrid/Electric vehicle specialist certification among them) that didn't exist when I became a master technician. I recertified several times over the years, but finally let them expire in 1996. At that time my day job required up to 200 travel days per year, and there just wasn't enough time to attempt to keep up on a career I had left behind.

At first there were few if any believers in the system. As time went on it became more and more popular. Now it's to the point that no reputable garage or dealership will hire anyone that isn't certified in one or more of the disciplines. I'm sure there are still some bozo's out there doing things they shouldn't. However they are now a small minority of those working in the field.
Having done a formal apprenticeship I have always found the American system hard to understand given that the Guild system was in place throughout the civilised world when America was colonized and while the Guilds morphed into Trades with formal education everywhere else this didn't happen in America.
Great news on that front too, this morning on the local news it was announced that in a major nationwide poll 85% of people polled thought an apprenticeship and Trade qualification was more valuable than a university degree.
Nice to know that common sense is returning to the masses.
 

extropic

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I do understand that there are lots of businesses that hire under educated staff, and have few if any scruples. Your situation sounds much the same as it did here in the 1960's and even later. I got into the auto business in the early 1970's just as NAISE (National Institute for Automotive Service Excellence) came into being. This institute was the first organization to test and certify technicians in all fields of automotive and truck repair. To get ahead of the game I took the certification tests as early as 1974. At that time I had to pass the tests in 8 different categories to become a Certified Master Technician. Times have changed a bit since then The name of the institute has now been shortened to ASE, and there are additional categories available (Compressed natural gas certification, and Light Duty Hybrid/Electric vehicle specialist certification among them) that didn't exist when I became a master technician. I recertified several times over the years, but finally let them expire in 1996. At that time my day job required up to 200 travel days per year, and there just wasn't enough time to attempt to keep up on a career I had left behind.

At first there were few if any believers in the system. As time went on it became more and more popular. Now it's to the point that no reputable garage or dealership will hire anyone that isn't certified in one or more of the disciplines. I'm sure there are still some bozo's out there doing things they shouldn't. However they are now a small minority of those working in the field.
ASE certification and the requisite education are great however, it seems to me that you're equating certification with conscientiousness.
They are not at all the same thing, not even close.
In the U.S., medical errors are the third-leading cause of death after heart disease and cancer. Who is more "certified" than doctors and nurses?
 

silverhawk

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As someone who works in cybersecurity in a place that requires degrees to work, I have to chime in here. A degree proves that someone had the ability to put themselves through four (or more) years of "listen to someone lecture, then regurgitate that baloney in a test". They are great for a corporate meeting environment.

However, if I was allowed to choose between a degree possessor who was purely theoretical vs. a self taught, down-in-the-trenches individual who could look at something and understand what was happening, I'd be taking the self taught in a heart beat. To often, we equate education and certifications with expertise.

That said, if no one hires anyone without experience, how does one gain experience? Hiring managers need to be able to see through the pig crap and know what kind of person they are hiring. I typically ask a question just out of the candidates reach of knowledge because it tells me two things. First, are they the person that will tell me something they think I want to hear, or are they willing to admit they don't know the answer? That also lets me know how they will react if they make a mistake. I don't care if a mistake is made as much as I care if you own that mistake. If you own it and learn from it, you are better for it. Give me a technical person over a theoretical any day. If someone came to me with no experience but could demonstrate a strong ability to learn and adapt, you will have much hire stock than someone who claims expertise with a degree but has no application of anything.

My wife just started talking about trades being more desirable than degrees, and she's a teacher.

joe
 

NortonDommi

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Silverhawke,
I think you have hit the nail on the head. My time was 9500 hours with some taken off for academic achievements and passing of practical tests. The beauty of a formal Trade is that in most countries it comprises high level,(University),academic study combined with on the job practical hands-on work. It sets you up to tackle everything except to corporate office environment. There being a huge amount of cross-Trade skills it is easy to move to another Trade if desired and also gives a very good basis for academic study in a university environment if one can stomach the political correctness and outright BS that you will be surrounded with.
 

pdentrem

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After nearly a dozen years, I finally purchased the reducer for my Orion 80ED telescope, but the focuser is not threaded to attach the reducer as it is the Williams Optics replacement. So this morning I took an adapter and threaded the end to fit. Since I was only threading vs making the whole item it did not take long. Switch the lathe gear to metric as the thread is 1.0 and resharpen the tool to make proper threads in the aluminum adapter.

Pierre
EB1EBB0F-A96E-44BC-B031-3C250EE9B44F.jpeg EE479E90-0E75-45A7-BAE6-E25017879D67.jpeg
 

hman

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Nice job. And it's very perceptive of you to realize that "storge" likely comes before "outfeed." Many's the horizontal surface I've cluttered ...
 

eugene13

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My son's project took most of the day: We're doing some modifications to the roll cage of a race car, he spent 5 hours getting the fit of the right side "A" pillar, sometimes you the only tool that works is a file.
 

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NortonDommi

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My son's project took most of the day: We're doing some modifications to the roll cage of a race car, he spent 5 hours getting the fit of the right side "A" pillar, sometimes you the only tool that works is a file.
Having once built roll-cages for a living an air power die-grinder with a 5/8" Flame burr, an air powered pistol grip sander and an air-file were essential tools.
 

Downunder Bob

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Silverhawke,
I think you have hit the nail on the head. My time was 9500 hours with some taken off for academic achievements and passing of practical tests. The beauty of a formal Trade is that in most countries it comprises high level,(University),academic study combined with on the job practical hands-on work. It sets you up to tackle everything except to corporate office environment. There being a huge amount of cross-Trade skills it is easy to move to another Trade if desired and also gives a very good basis for academic study in a university environment if one can stomach the political correctness and outright BS that you will be surrounded with.
I hear you Norton, my trade Fitter and Turner + Toolmaker, was very interesting, and intensive. When I later studied Marine Engineering at Uni, It was a relatively easy transition, although some of the maths was pretty tough, it was never my strong suit. And as you say the PC and BS were rather hard to handle.
 

DiscoDan

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I guess you could call cutting my first threads "what I made in my shop today". My colleague at Tuckahoe Steam and Gas Association gave me a lesson and set me loose on the Logan. The threads are a bit rough but you know they are threads so I count that as a success!
 

pdentrem

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Next project is to make a new mirror cell for the Explorer Scientic 12” truss that failed the previous owner. I bought the scope as is and on tear down found the issue!
Pierre
3D7BA6B7-2DDA-4848-92E0-738253142864.jpeg
 

GoceKU

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Today i had small project to do on my lathe so i took couple of pictures to share it. The project was to enlarge the centre hole of couple of 16" car rims. The first task was to modify the hub i'm using to hold the rims, i cut the centre of the hub and made a relief for the cutter then mounted the rim and made couple of cuts to bring it to size. Quick project and as big in diameter as my lathe can handle, not bad for a small machine as my.
IMG_20200222_124927.jpg IMG_20200222_130828.jpg IMG_20200222_131449.jpg IMG_20200222_131453.jpg IMG_20200222_131458.jpg IMG_20200222_134648.jpg
 

Winegrower

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I liked the tilt table with a cylinder that is held in the vise and the cylinder can be rotated to the desired angle. I had the stuff on hand, so made it up. As you can see in the first picture, I used a spin indexer to rotate the cylinder so that I could put some small flats at zero, 30 and 45 degrees. These flats let you position the table at exactly the right angle by using a small wedge, like a piece of tool steel or such and keep the cylinder oriented correctly. I was pleased at how accurate this works out to be, as the second picture shows using a reference 45 triangle to check. 0.001 movement over about 3" is routinely achievable just with the wedge/shim approach. If there were a particular unique angle you needed, it's simple to add another flat.
Incidentally, another shortcut, I sorted out two small Samarium Cobalt magnets which were equal thickness within 50 millionths, freeing up a hand or two during verification alignment.
I also had a small not very useful vise laying around in the way, so I fly cut the base, trimmed the sides square, and otherwise plumbed it via machining on the mill, and mounted it to the tilt plate with 4 bolts that hold the vise in X or Y oriented alignment as needed. Of course you could add mounting holes on the tilt plate in advance, or to fit a particular project. I will probably stop at this level until some need comes up.
 

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Logan 400

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I bought a carriage stop for my Logan 400. It was home made and I figured I could maybe modify it if needed. The top was too thick and had 2 machine screws with nuts through the bottom to bolt it on. I needed to reduce the thickness about 1/8" off the top. After several hours of filing, then drilling larger holes through the top part for larger bolts and tapping the bottom part I have a working carriage stop. I will modify the adjustment rod next.
KIMG1829.jpg KIMG1828.jpg
Not much clearance but it works.
Thanks for looking.
Jay
 

rwm

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I doubt it will sit that close to the headstock in regular use anyway?
Robert
 

Logan 400

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True. Shown for reference. About an inch too far left.
 

ozzie46

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I liked the tilt table with a cylinder that is held in the vise and the cylinder can be rotated to the desired angle. I had the stuff on hand, so made it up. As you can see in the first picture, I used a spin indexer to rotate the cylinder so that I could put some small flats at zero, 30 and 45 degrees. These flats let you position the table at exactly the right angle by using a small wedge, like a piece of tool steel or such and keep the cylinder oriented correctly. I was pleased at how accurate this works out to be, as the second picture shows using a reference 45 triangle to check. 0.001 movement over about 3" is routinely achievable just with the wedge/shim approach. If there were a particular unique angle you needed, it's simple to add another flat.
Incidentally, another shortcut, I sorted out two small Samarium Cobalt magnets which were equal thickness within 50 millionths, freeing up a hand or two during verification alignment.
I also had a small not very useful vise laying around in the way, so I fly cut the base, trimmed the sides square, and otherwise plumbed it via machining on the mill, and mounted it to the tilt plate with 4 bolts that hold the vise in X or Y oriented alignment as needed. Of course you could add mounting holes on the tilt plate in advance, or to fit a particular project. I will probably stop at this level until some need comes up.

Very well done.
I have a question about the angled steel baron the side of the vice at the fixed jaw area. Is that to stop movement of the fixed jaw when tightening the work in the vice and if it is how well does it work.

Ron
 
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